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  • Jen Harper 4:00 pm on 2019/12/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , fetch-22, karen's witch, , , , , young readers   

    December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers 

    The holiday season is upon us, which means decking those halls, wrapping presents, baking cookies, and making sure the kids have enough reading material to make it through all those days off school. We’ve rounded up the best new releases for young readers this month, including new installments to favorite Dav Pilkey series Captain Underpants and Dog Man, the first Baby-Sitters Club Little Sister book to get the graphic novel treatment, the kick-off in a new series for unicorn lovers, and more. Check out our top picks and let us know what books your kids will be curling up by the fire to read over the break.

    Captain Underpants and the Terrifying Return of Tippy Tinkletrousers (Captain Underpants Series #9—Color Edition), by Dav Pilkey
    In this brand-new color edition of the ninth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious Captain Underpants series, George and Harold are in jail even though they’re totally innocent—of the crime they’re being accused of, anyway. And now time-traveling tyrant Tippy Tinkletrousers is pulling them from behind bars and back into their carefree kindergarten days, where they’ll have to face sixth-grade bully Kipper Krupp, who just happens to be the nephew of Principal Krupp. But this time, George and Harold don’t have Captain Underpants to bail them out, so the boys will have to rely on their wits alone in this fun read.

    Fetch-22 (Dog Man Series #8), by Dav Pilkey
    He’s half-man, half-dog, and all-cop—and he’s back with the eighth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious graphic novel series. This time, Petey the Cat is out of the slammer and has a new leash, er, lease on life. But Li’l Petey has gone the other way entirely—he can’t seem to find the bright side of anything anymore. Can Dog Man and Petey put their differences aside to help Li’l Petey go fetch his bright spirit once again? Find out in this exciting and funny new installment. Bonus for super-fans: This Barnes & Noble exclusive edition includes an awesome colorable pull-out poster.

    Karen’s Witch (Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix Series #1), by Katy Farina and Ann M. Martin
    First Ann M. Martin’s The Baby-Sitters Club books got the graphic novel treatment, and now her Little Sister series is getting in on the fun. For younger readers or for BSC fans looking to soak up even more of Martin’s Stoneybrook magic, Karen’s Witch is an awesome read starring Kristy Thomas’s 6-year-old stepsister Karen Brewer, who has a wild imagination and believes that the woman who lives next door to her father is actually a witch. With full-color illustrations and a fast-paced story, the first book in the new Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix series definitely falls into the category of dibbly fresh.

    Eva’s Campfire Adventure (Owl Diaries Series #12), by Rebecca Elliott
    The 12th book in this popular early chapter book series finds young owl Eva Wingdale prepping for a fun camping trip with her friends at school. Young readers can join the wilderness-venturing crew as they pitch tents, enjoy treats around the campfire, and even go on an exciting treasure hunt in the forest. Will Eva and her pals locate the treasure before their camping trip is over? Find out in this fun new book filled with illustrations, easy-to-read text, and large type to keep early readers motivated and confident.

    The Bad Guys in the Baddest Day Ever (The Bad Guys Series #10), by Aaron Blabey
    Fans of Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants will love the 10th installment in Aaron Blabey’s hilarious and action-packed The Bad Guys series. In it, the Bad Guys and even Badder Girls are in a battle to the finish against Crown Prince Marmalade to see who is really the baddest of them all. Yes, the Bad Guys—our group of wannabe heroes out there doing good deeds whether you like it or not—are in for their baddest day ever in this new illustrated novel sure to entertain and enthrall fans of the series.

    Bo’s Magical New Friend (Unicorn Diaries Series #1), by Rebecca Elliott
    From the creator of the bestselling Owl Diaries early chapter books comes a brand-new series for helping young readers grow their reading confidence and stamina. In this first installment in the Unicorn Diaries books, young unicorn Bo Tinseltail attends Sparklegrove with all of the other magical unicorns—Bo’s magical power is the ability to grant wishes. And what Bo wishes for most of all is a best friend. And when a new unicorn named Sunny Huckleberry comes to school, it looks like Bo’s wish might just come true in this delightful story of friendship.

    Bad Kitty Joins the Team, by Nick Bruel
    The hilariously high maintenance Bad Kitty is back for another illustrated tale sure to keep fans of the series entertained. In the latest story, Kitty’s owner realizes it’s time for this cat to get in shape and start exercising—much to Kitty’s chagrin. Will Kitty be able to get in touch with her sporty side and get into the game? It may take some serious convincing, but surely Kitty’s competitive spirit will pop out in a flash. Kids will love Kitty’s hilarious antics and the accompanying illustrations in this new read.

    What are your young readers into this month?

    The post December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 4:00 pm on 2019/12/02 Permalink
    Tags: , bo's magical new friend, , , , fetch-22, karen's witch, , , , , young readers   

    December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers 

    The holiday season is upon us, which means decking those halls, wrapping presents, baking cookies, and making sure the kids have enough reading material to make it through all those days off school. We’ve rounded up the best new releases for young readers this month, including new installments to favorite Dav Pilkey series Captain Underpants and Dog Man, the first Baby-Sitters Club Little Sister book to get the graphic novel treatment, the kick-off in a new series for unicorn lovers, and more. Check out our top picks and let us know what books your kids will be curling up by the fire to read over the break.

    Captain Underpants and the Terrifying Return of Tippy Tinkletrousers (Captain Underpants Series #9—Color Edition), by Dav Pilkey
    In this brand-new color edition of the ninth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious Captain Underpants series, George and Harold are in jail even though they’re totally innocent—of the crime they’re being accused of, anyway. And now time-traveling tyrant Tippy Tinkletrousers is pulling them from behind bars and back into their carefree kindergarten days, where they’ll have to face sixth-grade bully Kipper Krupp, who just happens to be the nephew of Principal Krupp. But this time, George and Harold don’t have Captain Underpants to bail them out, so the boys will have to rely on their wits alone in this fun read.

    Fetch-22 (Dog Man Series #8), by Dav Pilkey
    He’s half-man, half-dog, and all-cop—and he’s back with the eighth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious graphic novel series. This time, Petey the Cat is out of the slammer and has a new leash, er, lease on life. But Li’l Petey has gone the other way entirely—he can’t seem to find the bright side of anything anymore. Can Dog Man and Petey put their differences aside to help Li’l Petey go fetch his bright spirit once again? Find out in this exciting and funny new installment. Bonus for super-fans: This Barnes & Noble exclusive edition includes an awesome colorable pull-out poster.

    Karen’s Witch (Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix Series #1), by Katy Farina and Ann M. Martin
    First Ann M. Martin’s The Baby-Sitters Club books got the graphic novel treatment, and now her Little Sister series is getting in on the fun. For younger readers or for BSC fans looking to soak up even more of Martin’s Stoneybrook magic, Karen’s Witch is an awesome read starring Kristy Thomas’s 6-year-old stepsister Karen Brewer, who has a wild imagination and believes that the woman who lives next door to her father is actually a witch. With full-color illustrations and a fast-paced story, the first book in the new Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix series definitely falls into the category of dibbly fresh.

    Eva’s Campfire Adventure (Owl Diaries Series #12), by Rebecca Elliott
    The 12th book in this popular early chapter book series finds young owl Eva Wingdale prepping for a fun camping trip with her friends at school. Young readers can join the wilderness-venturing crew as they pitch tents, enjoy treats around the campfire, and even go on an exciting treasure hunt in the forest. Will Eva and her pals locate the treasure before their camping trip is over? Find out in this fun new book filled with illustrations, easy-to-read text, and large type to keep early readers motivated and confident.

    The Bad Guys in the Baddest Day Ever (The Bad Guys Series #10), by Aaron Blabey
    Fans of Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants will love the 10th installment in Aaron Blabey’s hilarious and action-packed The Bad Guys series. In it, the Bad Guys and even Badder Girls are in a battle to the finish against Crown Prince Marmalade to see who is really the baddest of them all. Yes, the Bad Guys—our group of wannabe heroes out there doing good deeds whether you like it or not—are in for their baddest day ever in this new illustrated novel sure to entertain and enthrall fans of the series.

    Bo’s Magical New Friend (Unicorn Diaries Series #1), by Rebecca Elliott
    From the creator of the bestselling Owl Diaries early chapter books comes a brand-new series for helping young readers grow their reading confidence and stamina. In this first installment in the Unicorn Diaries books, young unicorn Bo Tinseltail attends Sparklegrove with all of the other magical unicorns—Bo’s magical power is the ability to grant wishes. And what Bo wishes for most of all is a best friend. And when a new unicorn named Sunny Huckleberry comes to school, it looks like Bo’s wish might just come true in this delightful story of friendship.

    Bad Kitty Joins the Team, by Nick Bruel
    The hilariously high maintenance Bad Kitty is back for another illustrated tale sure to keep fans of the series entertained. In the latest story, Kitty’s owner realizes it’s time for this cat to get in shape and start exercising—much to Kitty’s chagrin. Will Kitty be able to get in touch with her sporty side and get into the game? It may take some serious convincing, but surely Kitty’s competitive spirit will pop out in a flash. Kids will love Kitty’s hilarious antics and the accompanying illustrations in this new read.

    What are your young readers into this month?

    The post December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 8:52 pm on 2015/03/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , young readers   

    Top Picks in Graphic Novels for Young Readers 

    Graphic novels are a great way to get kids excited about reading. From beginning readers, to reluctant readers, to kids looking to experience their favorite novels, games, and films in an entirely new way, everyone will captivated by the powerful imagery and captivating storytelling in these books.

    Smile, by Raina Telgemeier
    This story of a dental disaster perfectly captures the horror of being a tween and feeling physically different from your peers. Sixth grader Raina falls and damages her front teeth one night after Girl Scouts, and must endure pain both physical (from surgery, to braces, to uncomfortable headgear) and social (embarrassment, ostracizing from her friends, and, oh, the boy problems). Based on the author/artist’s own experiences, this achingly true graphic novel is perfect for any kid experiencing growing pains.

    Ghostopolis, by Doug TenNapel
    It sounds like a zany adventure—young Garth Hales is mistakenly zapped into the afterworld by a ghosthunter. Garth explores the strange world with his new companion, a skeletal horse, meeting oddball creatures and departed family members along the way. TenNapel gives the story weight, framing it with Garth’s diagnosis with a terminal disease. This is both a fun, fabulously creative romp and a profound book about death.

    Pokemon Pocket Comics: Black & White
    If you’ve caught one Pokemon, you’ve gotta catch ‘em all, and this collection of four-panel comics, trivia, puzzels, and quizzes allows gamers to keep hunting even after the batteries have powered down for the evening.

    The Lightning Thief: The Graphic Novel, by Rick Riordan, adapted by Robert Venditti
    Riordan’s gleeful YA riff on Greek myth makes a perfect transition to graphic novel. Dramatic, eye-catching comic book artwork proves to be the perfect medium for the story of a teenage boy who finds out he’s the son of a Zeus and winds up attending a summer camp literally run by the gods. 

    Bone #1: Out from Boneville, by Jeff Smith
    Available for the first time in color, this updated version of Jeff Smith’s classic coming-of-age graphic novel series is perfect for readers of all ages. When Ford Bone and his two cousins are thrown out of Boneville, they find themselves on an epic quest that will see them face monsters, magic, a banished princess, and a dragon, not to mention flesh-eating rats. A perfect gift for young fantasy fans. 

    The Stonekeeper, by Kazu Kibuishi
    What begins as a haunted house tale becomes something much more in this daring, ambitious graphic novel. After their father’s death, siblings Emily and Navin move with their mother into the very strange home of a distant relative—a home with a sinister door in the basement, through which exists a world of monsters, mayhem, and mortal danger. When their mother is lured through the door by a malevolent tentacled beast, Emily and Navin set off on a quest to save her, and must face the most difficult challenge of all: learning to make their own choices.

    Daniel X: Alien Hunter, by James Patterson
    Patterson’s trademark blend of memorable characters and addictive storytelling flourishes in graphic novel format. Aliens killed Daniel’s parents. Now, with the help of the prized List of Alien Outlaws, Daniel is ready to claim his father’s title of Alien Hunter and get revenge. The same young teens who turned the Maximum Ride series into a sensation will gobble up this sci-fi action-adventure. 

    Plants vs. Zombies: Lawnmageddon, by Paul Tobin and Ron Chan (illustrator)
    Put down that smartphone and pick up a book! The zany world of the popular app makes for a graphic novel series that’s just as addictive (and adorably illustrated), as “Crazy Dave” the inventor helps his niece Patrice and her friend Nate fight off an undead uprising.

    Monster High: I Only Have Eyes for You, by Heather Nuhfer and Kelee Riley (illustrator)
    Based on the popular toy line, this graphic novel series imagines the horrifically funny antics of the student bodies (undead and otherwise) of Monster High, including favorite characters Cleo, Scarah, Draculaura, Lagoona, and Iris Clops. This volume collects six original stories that perfectly incapsulate the weirdness of being a teenager—human, vampire, or ghoul. 

    Cardboard, by Doug TenNapel
    Cam’s dad can’t afford to give him a birthday present, so he gives him a cardboard box instead. Together, the two craft it into a cardboard man—who suddenly comes to life! When the neighborhood bully discovers he can repeat the same process over and over, he constructs a paper army and tries to take over the town, and Cam and his dad must band together to stop the decidedly strange menace. As in Ghostopolis, TenNapel gives this outsized adventure real weight through the exploration of our father and son heroes’ shared grief over the recent death of Cam’s mother

    Frozen: The Cinestory, Vol. 1
    It seems no one can get enough of Elsa, Anna, Olaf, and friends, and now there’s a whole different way to experienced the beloved new classic. The Cinestory adaptation of the hit film translates stills from the movie into comic book panels, allowing the story to come alive on the page.

    Angry Birds Comics, Vol. 1: Welcome to the Flock
    Another app-turned-comic, this first volume of the hilarious adaptation of the smartphone phenomenon tells the epic story of some very sneaky pigs, a bunch of stolen eggs, and a band of very angry birds determined to get them back, whatever it takes. A must for every slingshot-wielding young swine hunter.

    Korgi, Book 1: Sprouting Wings, by Christian Slade
    In Korgi Hollow, friendly, doglike korgis live in harmony with their companions, the Mollies. In this black-and-white, largely dialogue-free graphic novel, Ivy, a young Mollie, and her korgi Sprout are trapped outside of their village and must brave a forest teeming with danger in order to make their way back home. Slade, a former Disney animator, brings an entire world to life almost solely with his drawings in this all-ages adventure story.

    Shop all kids’ books >
     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 6:54 pm on 2015/03/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , , public school superhero, young readers   

    James Patterson’s Public School Superhero Has a Powerful Message 

    Kenny Wright, the relatable protagonist of Public School Superhero, is a smart, introverted kid who faces many obstacles in his daily life—not only because he is bullied by his peers, but also because he attends an overcrowded, underfunded inner-city public school, which presents its own uniquely disheartening set of problems.

    As the book opens, Kenny describes how he and the other kids who attend Washington D.C.’s Union Middle School have their backpacks searched by security guards before they’re allowed to go inside the building each morning—and that’s just the beginning. The tiny library has two computers for the entire school, and there’s no gym. In Kenny’s first class, the kids are given history textbooks that are so old and crumbling, they practically are history, and there aren’t enough seats to go around—which doesn’t matter much, since their first-period teacher basically ignores them. And then there’s the bathroom, which is so scary that Kenny vows he’ll never use it: “I’ve decided that if I ever have to go, I’m just going to hold it until high school.” He adds, “sometimes in life, especially life at Fort Union, a brotha has to weigh his options. Carefully.” This charming and frank narrative voice is part of what makes Kenny the kind of protagonist kids will root for—especially as he struggles, like so many middle schoolers do, to balance his desire to be true to himself with his longing to fit in with everyone else.

    A chess enthusiast who is being raised by his strict grandma (whom he calls “G-ma”), Kenny’s mild, easygoing demeanor makes him a target for the many bullies at his school, where he is stuffed into his locker and regularly loses the baked goods G-ma makes for him to his tough, intimidating classmates, who tease him and call him “Grandma’s Boy.” Although he spends his days avoiding these jerks, in his head Kenny dreams of hunting down criminals as his alter-ego, the fearless superhero Stainlezz Steel. A series of engaging comic book-style interludes throughout the book show the adventurous exploits of Stainlezz Steel as he battles evil-doers and fights for justice in Kenny’s imagination. Kenny knows that fighting for justice in the real world is a lot harder, although G-ma, a spitfire who suffers no fools, pushes him to dream big, reminding him that making a difference in even one person’s life is a worthy achievement.

    Kenny gets the chance to do just that when the unconventional Dr. Yetty, the latest new principal for Union Middle School (which, unsurprisingly, has a high turnover rate for principals), drafts Kenny into giving chess lessons to one of his troubled classmates, a skinny, frenetic boy named Ray-Ray. In return for the chess lessons, which he enjoys, Ray-Ray takes Kenny under his wing, vowing to help him change his pushover reputation. As Kenny begins standing up for himself and running with a tougher crowd, he discovers a wellspring of courage he wasn’t aware he had, even as he does things he knows G-ma wouldn’t approve of, which leaves him feeling heavily conflicted. As Kenny and Ray-Ray grow closer, events are set into motion that will change the lives of both boys in astonishing and moving ways.

    Kenny Wright is not a superhero in real life, and the problems he and the other students at Union Middle School confront every day are real; much more nuanced, complicated, and heartbreaking than the simple good vs. evil conflicts that Stainlezz Steel faces. But when the opportunity arises for Kenny and his grandmother to rally their friends and neighbors around a unifying cause—that of hanging onto their beloved principal Dr. Yetty when she’s abruptly transferred to another school—Kenny digs deep within himself and finds the courage to address a crowd of students and parents during a massive rally. It’s a poignant reminder to Kenny, and to readers, that you don’t have to have super powers to make a difference in the world.

    Pre-order Public School Superhero now >
     
  • Heidi Fiedler 7:08 pm on 2014/09/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , young readers   

    Fun Reads for the Ivy and Bean Set 

    Ivy and BeanIf your young readers love to get lost in a hilarious adventure, they’ve probably already discovered the Ivy and Bean series, by Annie Barrows. Ivy and Bean are the queens of silly neighborhood capers (and don’t think those girls are just for kids. I’ve caught my husband chuckling at a picture of Bean holding an absurd number of straws in her mouth). So what can boys and girls read next when they need a laugh, but aren’t quite ready for a full-length novel? One of these titles is sure to strike their funny bone. Don’t be surprised when you hear them giggling at bedtime!

    Amelia Bedelia, by Herman Parish
    Kids love to be in on the joke before the characters, and poor Amelia Bedelia is never in on the joke. She takes everything very literally, and silliness always ensues. These books are packed with puns and colloquialisms that will have kids grinning.

    Flat Stanley, by Jeff Brown
    Living life as flat as a pancake is hard, and Flat Stanley has the funny illustrations to prove it. Is this series going to have adults rolling on the floor laughing? Probably not. But you can bet that any kid who reads Flat Stanley is going to spend the rest of the day dreaming about what it would be like to be so flat you could slip through a mail slot and travel the world.

    Judy Moody, by Megan McDonald
    This series starts by announcing, “Judy Moody was in a mood. Not a good mood. A bad mood. A mad-faced mood.” Roar! Who can’t relate to that? Author cDonald keeps these books moving and has the perfect mix of sympathy and skepticism toward her young heroine. Readers new to the series will be glad to know there are many more books to enjoy, and boys will enjoy the series about Judy’s younger brother, Stink.

    Mercy Watson, by Kate DiCamillo
    Writer DiCamillo is currently using her big brain to promote children’s literacy as the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. But in her spare time, she writes wonderful books for readers of all ages. Some are poignant and others are silly. The Mercy Watson series is a favorite of young fans of slapstick.

    Miss Daisy Is Crazy, by Dan Gutman
    Gutman skewers the characters that make up every second grader’s world: teachers, principals, and students. Meet the dumbest teacher in the world, a crazy librarian, and a principal who’s totally nuts. They’re all the target of his outrageous brand of humor in this silly, silly series.

    What books have your young readers giggling?

     
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