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  • Sarah Skilton 2:00 pm on 2018/09/07 Permalink
    Tags: back in the saddle, , , , thrillers   

    6 Reasons Andrew Shaffer’s Hope Never Dies Is the Perfect Buddy Comedy 

    If you’ve ever chuckled at an Obama/Biden meme, in which Joe plays a prank and Barack rolls his eyes affectionately, Andrew Shaffer’s Hope Never Dies—one part mystery, one part fanfic—is for you. When his favorite Amtrak conductor dies and all evidence points to murder, the former Veep can’t resist launching his own investigation. After all, life has gotten a bit dull since vacating his post in D.C., and he’s eager to be useful again, especially if that means teaming up with his partner-in-service and BFF, the 44th President of the United States. A perfect buddy comedy ensues. Here are six reasons why we love it.

    1. It’s fast-paced with a concise narrative voice
    Shaffer knew to keep things short and sweet. Chapters range from one to five pages, and the yarn is narrated by Biden himself, using semi-hardboiled prose: “I glanced over my shoulder, but no one was there. Barack had disappeared into the inky darkness, same as he’d come, leaving nothing behind but the stale smell of smoke.” (Don’t worry: with one exception, Obama sticks to Nicorette gum.) 

    2. The dialogue is gold
    Biden, re: the machinations of an apparent femme fatale: “Son of a buttermilk biscuit, we got bamboozled!” Obama, in response to whether he’ll run for any type of office again: “Michelle would kill me in my sleep. She said she’d smother me with a pillow. Even showed me which one she’d use.” 

    3. Its characters’ behavior is very on brand.
    Obama is “cool as cucumber lotion” in tense situations, but always willing to step into the fray when needed, as when Joe’s being held at gunpoint by a biker gang. Joe, who swaps his bomber jacket and aviator sunglasses for a KISS MY BASS hat as a “disguise,” is impulsive and hotheaded, eager to go with his gut, as when he storms the hideout of the aforementioned biker gang. Together they’re unstoppable. 

    4. A genuine relationship shines through
    The former Veep and ex-President are best friends and it shows, even if they’re going through a rough patch right now. There’s nothing either wouldn’t do for the other, even if they bicker like brothers. Obama schools Biden on the flowers he chose for Jill (“The lily is a funeral flower. If you were going for romantic, you should have gone for roses”) and Biden accuses Obama of ditching their true-blue friendship to go windsurfing with celebrities (cough, Richard Branson). Their initial meetup sets the tone: “I offered a handshake. Barack turned it into a fist bump. It was a greeting I’d never been able to master, but I gave it my best shot. Barack smirked. Just like old times.”

    5. Funny situations abound
    When a fast-food clerk makes a casual remark about global warming, Barack can’t resist explaining the finer points of it to her, and his passion for the topic wins her over. He and his secret service agent, healthy eaters both, are horrified by what Joe orders at a diner (a “hot and bothered” plate of hash browns, covered with “cheese, onion, diced ham, and jalapeno.”) To pass the time inside a particularly rancid no-tell motel, Biden and Obama launch into a game of “POTUS, SCOTUS, or FLOTUS,” in which one of them names three women, and the other responds with the role he’d prefer for her. (Prior to participating, Obama acknowledges it’s a little demeaning to women, and wonders if Strom Thurmond came up with it.)

    6. It’s absurd but brilliant
    While picturing the events of the story, you may occasionally think, “This is CRAZY.” But is it? I mean, who could have predicted what would happen once this duo left office? Is this any crazier than what has actually occurred since 2016? My advice is to embrace the setup, because if you’re willing to suspend disbelief, it’s sort of plausible. I like to think so, anyway.

    The post 6 Reasons Andrew Shaffer’s <i>Hope Never Dies</i> Is the Perfect Buddy Comedy appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:30 pm on 2018/08/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , , thrillers,   

    September’s Best Thrillers 

    Juror #3, by James Patterson and Nancy Allen
    Paterson, perhaps the world’s most successful and prolific thriller writer, teams up with Allen, a former attorney and seasoned writer to tell the story of Ruby Bozarth. Ruby is new to the Mississippi bar and the town of Rosedale, but she’s barely got time to find her bearings when she’s assigned to a sensational case. A rich girl is dead and a college football star stands accused, and the prosecutor and judge think Ruby’s inexperience will let them ram through a quick conviction. Ruby’s determined to prove them wrong, and with a little help from a well-armed fellow attorney and a short order cook with a lot of secrets she mounts a defense. But Ruby begins to suspect the biggest obstacle to justice might just be the jurors on the case, who have plenty of secrets of their own.

    Shadow Tyrants, by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
    Cussler teams up with engineer and author Morrison again for the 13th Oregon Files adventure, which finds a mysterious group known as the Nine Unknown seeking to use ancient technology and knowledge to take control of the world for its own good. One member of the Nine, Romir Malik, dissents, however, convinced that the project—code-named Colossus—will destroy humanity instead. It’s once again up to The Corporation and the crew of the Oregon to put the deceptively-weathered high-tech ship on the front lines in order to save the world, as Malik’s solution is to use a network of killer satellites to destroy Colossus, a cure that might be just as bad as the disease.

    Lies, by T.M. Logan
    Logan’s debut begins with an innocent impulse. Joe Lynch and his son William are driving in North London when William sees his mother’s car and insists they surprise her. Joe follows Melissa to a hotel, where he watches her argue with her best friend’s husband, the wealthy Ben Delaney. Before he can confront her, Melissa drives off, so Joe confronts Ben instead, getting into a fight that ends with his phone missing and Ben unconscious. Joe leaves; when he comes back for his phone everything is gone. Melissa denies an affair, but when Ben is supposedly murdered her lie is revealed, and Joe finds himself framed for a murder he knows is impossible—because he knows Ben is alive. Behind the mystery is the real question: just how long has Melissa been lying—and why?

    Cross Her Heart, by Sarah Pinborough
    In Pinborough’s tense new book, Lisa is a tightly-wound overprotective mother. Her daughter Ava is a champion athlete who’s tired of being protected, and sneaking around with her first boyfriend behind Lisa’s back and communicating with a mysterious man online. Marilyn is Lisa’s bestie pushing her to ‛get back out there.’ But Lisa has secrets that have taught her to be careful, and when she drops her guard and lets her photo be taken when Ava is hailed a hero in the press, those secrets come crashing down on her, threatening her safety and her relationship with her daughter. She and Marilyn have to push through their own problems and join forces in order to save Ava from the past which has come back in terrifying force.

    The Labyrinth of the Spirits, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    Bestselling Zafón offers up the fourth and final entry in his Cemetery of Forgotten Books series, catching up with the characters from the first three as they make their way under the repressive rule of Francisco Franco from the late 1930s to the 1970s. But the focus is on Alicia Gris, who survives a bombing as a little girl and carries the scars into adulthood as she works for the secret police as an investigator. Her final case involves the disappearance of the country’s Minister of Culture, Mauricio Valls. A rare book is her first clue in an investigation that begins to reveal the depth of cruelty and violence that Franco’s regime inflicted on the country—a truth so dangerous to the powers that be that Alicia’s soon has to make a choice: risk her life by pursuing the truth, or allow herself to be intimidated into silence.

    When the Lights Go Out, by Mary Kubica
    Jessie Sloane is 17 when her mother, Eden, passes away. Grieving and suffering from insomnia, Jessie decides to sell the house and move on to community college. But she discovers that 17 years ago someone filed a death certificate in her name, and now she has no official identity. As Jessie’s sleepless nights melt into a timeless nightmare, Eden’s heartbreaking story comes to the forefront. Two decades before, she and Aaron were in love and desperately wanted children, but couldn’t conceive. Eden’s obsession with having a child slowly transforms into a frightening compulsion, driving Aaron away. Separated by decades, a mother and a daughter both go down dark paths—and reach shocking conclusions.

    Leave No Trace, by Mindy Mejia
    Two fascinating characters collide in Mejia’s newest thriller. Maya Stark is a young speech therapist pushed by her former psychiatrist to take on a challenging case she doesn’t feel ready for. Lucas Blackthorn is a violent, mute man who’d been presumed dead for years after his father took him into the vast wilderness of Boundary Waters—until he was arrested after a botched robbery. Now Lucas wants nothing more than to escape back to the wilderness and tend to his father, and Maya finds herself being drawn to his perspective so strongly she makes decisions that are more than just ethically dubious—they might be extremely dangerous as well. As her secrets are revealed, Maya becomes increasingly determined to help Lucas no matter the cost.

    The Ancient Nine, by Ian K. Smith
    Smith’s followup to his debut, The Blackbird Papers, is a behind-the-scenes glimpse at Harvard’s tony secret clubs that drips with tension and bulges with secrets. In 1988, Spenser Collins is a champion African-American swimmer who gets a prestigious invitation to join Harvard’s Delphic Club. Intrigued by the idea of connecting with the elite, he begins to investigate the club’s history, discovering not only a mysterious disappearance by a student named Erasmus Abbott who broke into the club in 1927, never to be seen again, but also the existence of a secret club-within-the club known as the Ancient Nine. As Collins digs deeper he learns more and more about this secretive and powerful group—and about their dangerous secret agenda.

    Nomad, by James Swallow
    In Swallow’s newest surefire bestseller, Marc Dane is an MI6 field agent who’s very happy working the computers, far from the grisly action. When his entire team is wiped out and he’s framed for their deaths, he has little choice but to head directly into danger. Labeled a traitor, Dane makes contact with the Rubicon Group and their agent Lucy Keyes, ex-U.S. Army and exactly the sort of skilled agent Dane needs to help him clear his name. Their investigation reveals a historic terrorist plot that could result in the worst attack ever known—and none of the world’s intelligence agencies are looking at the right information to stop it. Dane and Keyes will have to put their own needs aside and risk everything to save the world.

    The post September’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 1:30 pm on 2018/08/28 Permalink
    Tags: , book haul, , summer's best thrillers, thrillers   

    Bid Summer’s Heat Farewell with 8 Chilling Thrillers 

    It’s the end of August, and we’ve about had our fill of the heat. Unfortunately, the weather isn’t likely to oblige us with cooler temperatures for at least another month, but in the meantime, we can at least try to bring down our core temperatures by catching up on the most chilling thrillers of the year so far. Note: We understand that you can not actually cool off by reading, but we’re still adding all of these to the TBR pile.

    And for just one week, you can get them all for 50% off as part of Barnes & Noble’s first ever book haul blowout! Today through September 3, shop in stores and online to get half off of 150 select titles, across genres, for all ages, and including bestsellers, new releases, and more. When you shop in stores, you’ll get a free tote with purchase of three books, while supplies last.

    The President Is Missing, by Bill Clinton and James Patterson
    Combining his personal knowledge of the presidency with Patterson’s knowledge of how to write a heart-pounding thriller, Bill Clinton spins a story about President Jonathan Lincoln Duncan, under pressure from all sides, besieged by unhappy and hostile congressional committees, a determined assassin, and an apocalyptic threat only he knows about—a computer virus that could roll the clock back to the stone age overnight. Duncan sees just one way to deal with these combined threats—he walks out of the White House, leaving his security detail behind, and takes matters into his own hands.

    The Fallen, by David Baldacci
    Baldacci’s fourth Amos Decker novel heads to the small rust-belt town of Baronville, where Decker and FBI agent Alex Jamison are visiting with Alex’s family. Baronville’s a town in decline afflicted by an opioid crisis, and dealing with a series of brutal murders marked by mysterious clues that have the local cops stymied. It’s not long before Decker, who has a perfect memory since a head injury he suffered while a pro football player, stumbles onto the next grisly homicide scene—and with his special mental abilities, begins to see a pattern that goes far beyond Baronville. When the pattern touches on people Decker cares about, the mystery becomes a personal one—just as Decker discovers reasons to doubt his perfect memory.

    Spymaster, by Brad Thor
    The 17th Scot Harvath book finds the skilled agent finally feeling his age—though he’s still the most dangerous and effective employee at private security and espionage endeavor The Carlton Group. Across Europe, someone is assassinating diplomats, and Harvath is ordered to find out who—and why. When it’s revealed to be part of a plot by Russia to leverage the NATO alliance to draw the United States into a war, Harvath is tasked with stopping the Russian plan, and he goes on the offensive, identifying and hunting down the assassins themselves. Meanwhile, the founder of the Carlton Group battles a declining mental state that means the secrets of his long career are at risk—and the new head, former CIA chief Lydia Ryan, must scramble to protect those secrets—as well as her agents in the field.

    The 17th Suspect, by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
    Patterson and Paetro return to the Women’s Murder Club for the 17th go-round in a book that focuses on Sergeant Lindsay Boxer and ADA Yuki Castellano. Boxer is approached by a homeless woman who tells her the city’s homeless population is being hunted by a killer and the police are slow-walking the investigation. When Lindsay’s initial inquiries seem to confirm this, she’s outraged and goes on the warpath—with unexpected consequences that are serious enough for her friends in the Club to urge her to step back. Meanwhile, Yuki catches a rape case involving a man accusing his female superior of assault, and she thinks she can make the charges stick. But as she moves forward, the case seems to dissolve under her, and her opponent in the courtroom finds ways of getting under her skin. As Yuki struggles, Lindsay finds herself targeted by the killer she was hunting, as both women deal with personal problems that complicate their professional lives to the breaking point.

    Cutting Edge, by Ward Larsen
    Trey DeBolt is a rescue swimmer for the Coast Guard in Alaska. During a difficult rescue, his helicopter goes down—and he wakes up in cabin by the sea in Maine. He’s got a nasty scar on the back of his head and no memory of how he got there; his nurse informs him that he’s been declared dead even as a Coast Guard investigator in Alaska finds evidence he’s still alive. His nurse tells him that he’s undergone surgery that has gifted him with incredible abilities. Just as he’s figuring out he’s part of a secretive government experiment, his nurse is killed by a team of professional assassins—assassins meant for him. A sudden vision showing him information he couldn’t possibly know saves his life—and suddenly, Trey is on the run, trying to figure out just what’s happened to him, and how to control it, before it’s too late.

    Bring Me Back, by B.A. Paris
    In this tense thriller, Finn McQuaid and his fiancée Ellen are settled into a comfortable cottage in the small village of Simonbridge, financially secure thanks to a stroke of luck on Finn’s part. Their relationship is unusual; 12 years earlier Finn was dating Ellen’s sister Layla, until Layla disappeared while driving through France with Finn, with only a Russian nesting doll near the car for a clue. Initially a suspect, Finn was cleared of the crime, and over the years, their mutual loss and desire for comfort led Ellen and Finn to forge a bond. But now, the police are suddenly telling Finn that Layla’s been seen in town, and he and Ellen start receiving strange gifts—Russian nesting dolls. It’s clear Finn hasn’t been entirely forthcoming about the circumstances of Layla’s disappearance, but unraveling the truth of what’s really happening won’t be easy.

    Tailspin, by Sandra Brown
    Rye Mallett is a ‛freight dog,’ flying cargo around the country. He accepts a strange job flying a mysterious black box through bad weather to a remote area of Georgia, where Dr. Nathaniel Lambert will meet him to accept it. As Rye approaches the small airport, someone shines a laser into the cockpit, and Rye is temporarily blinded. He survives the crash, and when he exits the plane with the box he meets Brynn O’Neal, a beautiful doctor who claims Lambert sent her in his place. Although Rye doesn’t trust her, he has no choice but to accept her help when it becomes clear that there are others seeking whatever’s in the mystery box—and that they’re willing to kill for it.

    Red Alert, by James Patterson and Marshall Karp
    The fifth NYPD Red book shows us the 1 percent of Manhattan’s elite behaving badly—and being murdered at an alarming rate. When a filmmaker’s sex games go wrong and a charity function is bombed in the same night, Detectives Zach Jordan and Kylie MacDonald of the NYPD Red division respond, putting aside their own romantic and sexual tension to protect the rich and famous. As their investigation deepens, even they are shocked at the level of depravity and corruption on display—and when their search for the truth puts powerful people in danger, they’ll have no one but each other to rely on.

    What’s the best new thriller you read in 2018?

    The post Bid Summer’s Heat Farewell with 8 Chilling Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 3:00 pm on 2018/08/01 Permalink
    Tags: thrillers,   

    August’s Best New Thrillers 

    The dog days of August are known for their heat. Still, even with a nice shady spot and a tall glass of something iced, this month’s best thrillers may just get you sweating.

    Texas Ranger, by James Patterson and Andrew Bourelle
    Rory Yates is one of 200 lawmen who have been elevated to the status of Texas Ranger. Fast on the draw and dedicated to the Ranger creed of “never surrender,” Yates’ rise cost him his marriage to schoolteacher Anne. When Yates gets a call from Anne complaining of creepy phone calls and strange objects left at her home, he heads home, where he finds his former wife brutally murdered. Worse, Yates is the main suspect, and clearing his name dredges up connections and memories in he’d rather not recall. When a second murder occurs, Yates knows whoever’s responsible is targeting him specifically—and he will need his shooting skills and his reliance on the Ranger code to survive the twisted scheme.

    An Unwanted Guest, by Shari Lapena
    As a snowstorm surges in, a group of people arrive at Mitchell’s Inn deep in the Catskill Mountains. The storm cuts the power, and then Dana Hart is found dead on the very first evening at the bottom of the stairs. David Paley, an attorney, suspects her fiancé Matthew, but with no way to contact the outside world, he has  no choice but to wait out the storm alongside a potential murderer. Each guest has a dark secret to hide, and as more bodies turn up, it becomes clear the murderer isn’t done yet.

    The Other Woman, by Sandie Jones
    Emily Havistock meets Adam Banks, a good-looking, affluent IT recruiter in London, and thinks she’s found the perfect man. Then she meets Adam’s mother Pammie, with whom Adam has an unhealthy, extremely close relationship. Pammie clearly dislikes Emily, and does whatever she can think of to split them up, as Emily begins to suspect that the death of Adam’s previous girlfriend wasn’t an accident. Emily is willing to fight for Adam—even if it means ignoring the warning signs that there’s something deeply strange going on.

    Assassin’s Run, by Ward Larsen
    The fourth David Slaton novel opens with the professional assassination of a Russian oligarch on his yacht off the coast of Capri, killed with a single bullet. Because of the skill required, as well as other clues, Russian intelligence suspects a legendary Israeli assassin is responsible, but David Slaton knows the famous killer didn’t do the job—because he is that storied assassin. To clear his name, he travels to Capri and begins to investigate, pulling together the threads of an international conspiracy that leads directly to the Russian government itself.

    The Other Sister, by Sarah Zettel
    Geraldine and Marie Monroe’s mother died 25 years ago, and many folks still suspect their father did her in. Geraldine always blamed herself, and fled home as soon as she could. Marie stayed in the family home, called Rose House, with her emotionally abusive father and still lives there with her son Robbie. To the outside world, Marie is the good sister who stayed with her family and Geraldine is the bad one who ran away. When Geraldine returns home after losing her job, claiming to have come for Robbie’s graduation, she presents Marie with a plan to murder their father as final revenge for childhoods filled with harsh discipline and cruel lies. But Geraldine and Marie can’t even truly trust one another.

    The post August’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 6:00 pm on 2018/06/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , , thrillers,   

    July’s Best New Thrillers 

    The Other Woman, by Daniel Silva
    Silva’s 18th entry in the Gabriel Allon series finds the art restorer and Israel’s most effective spy drawn back into the struggle against Russia’s to tip the balance of world power in their favor. When one of Allon’s best assets inside Russian intelligence is assassinated while trying to defect, he investigates—and is soon on the trail of one of the biggest and best-kept secrets of the last few decades: there is a mole inside the highest corridors of power in the west—someone who has bided their time and now stands at the summit of power. Allon will have to risk everything and give all in order to stop the unthinkable.

    Spymaster, by Brad Thor
    The 17th Scot Harvath book finds the skilled agent finally feeling his age—though he’s still the most dangerous and effective employee at private security and espionage endeavor The Carlton Group. Across Europe, someone is assassinating diplomats, and Harvath is ordered to find out who—and why. When it’s revealed to be part of a plot by Russia to leverage the NATO alliance to draw the United States into a war, Harvath is tasked with stopping the Russian plan, and he goes on the offensive, identifying and hunting down the assassins themselves. Meanwhile, the founder of the Carlton Group battles a declining mental state that means the secrets of his long career are at risk—and the new head, former CIA chief Lydia Ryan, must scramble to protect those secrets—as well as her agents in the field.

    Give Me Your Hand, by Megan Abbott
    As a teenager, Kit Owens isn’t particularly ambitious—until she meets Diane Fleming, a troubled girl with a troubled past who pushes herself to perfection in everything. Kit finds herself being pushed along with her as they both pursue an elite science scholarship, until one night Diane shares a secret with Kit—and Kit, horrified, turns her back on Diane. A decade later, Kit is working in a prestigious lab under a famous scientist and pursuing a coveted spot on the male-dominated team, and she is shocked to find herself suddenly competing against Diane. Kit struggles to keep the past in the past as she realizes her connection to Diane, so long buried, is as powerful as ever—and Diane’s secret, which she worked so hard to forget, is as terrible as ever.

    Double Blind, by Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen
    The Johansens’ sixth Kendra Michaels novel finds the FBI agent drawn into a murder investigation when the victim, paralegal Elena Meyer, is found holding an envelope addressed to Kendra. Kendra doesn’t know Elena, and doesn’t recognize anyone on the video of a wedding reception contained on a memory stick in the envelope. She enlists the help of freelance investigator Adam Lynch—but the video suddenly disappears. As Adam and Kendra struggle with their attraction to one another, Kendra finds herself diving into a massive conspiracy—and tallying a rising body count.

    She Was the Quiet One, by Michele Campbell
    When their mother passes away, twins Rose and Bel are sent to Odell Academy, an elite boarding school. Rose is thrilled and immediately excels. but Bel falls in with a bad crowd. Both sisters forge unusually strong bonds with a married couple, Sarah and Heath, who act as both faculty advisors and dorm parents. When Bel gives in to peer pressure and hazes Rose, the bond between siblings is strained to the breaking point. Rose turns to Sarah and Bel turns to Heath, whose motives may be less than honorable. As the sisters’ relationship sours into violence, a deep and disturbing mystery arises, told through overlapping points of view and twisting timelines.

    Caged, by Ellison Cooper
    Sayer Altair, a talented special agent for the FBI, studies the patterns of serial killers in order to forget the tragedies that trail in her wake—parents dead in a horrific car crash, fiancé killed while working a mysterious case for the Bureau. She is forced to emerge from her research when she’s assigned to the case of Gwen Van Hurst, daughter of a senator who went missing a year before, who has been found dead in a cage in the basement of a booby-trapped house in Washington, D.C. Sayer learns that another victim may still be alive in a cage somewhere, kicking off a frantic race against time.

    Baby Teeth, by Zoje Stage
    Stage’s debut tells the story of fragile Suzette, battling with her distant, cold mother and the crippling effects of Crohn’s disease. Despite the physical risks, she and her husband Alex have a child. Determined to be a better mother than her own, Suzette tries her best, but Hanna is a difficult child. As the story opens, Hanna is seven years old and Suzette is home-schooling her because Hanna—who has yet to speak a word despite knowing how to read and write—refuses to behave. The only person for whom Hanna seems to have any affection is her father, and she views Suzette as a barrier between her and the total devotion of her dad. As Hanna’s behavior becomes more violent and unhinged, Alex doesn’t see the danger—but Suzette begins to fear for her life.

    Bound for Gold, by William Martin
    Rare-book dealer Peter Fallon returns along with his girlfriend Evangeline Carrington. At Peter’s son’s behest, the pair head out to California in search of the stolen journal of James Spencer of the Sagamore Mining Company, who searched for a legendary “river of gold.” Spencer’s story is one of violence and greed, racism and capitalism—in short, the story of America. And it’s a story that may not be quite over; as Peter and Evangeline hunt for the stolen book and stumble into a plot that threatens their lives.

    Four Dominions, by Eric Van Lustbader
    The third entry in Lustbader’s Testament series opens with Emma Shaw, artifacts expert, studying the recently acquired Testament of Lucifer onboard a private plane. Turbulence knocks lemon juice onto the parchment, revealing hidden writings that Emma reads before she realizes the danger—and finds herself possessed by the demon Beleth, who serves Lucifer’s plan to finally free Heaven itself from God’s tyranny. Beleth sets Emma to turning her brother, academic Bravo Shaw, towards evil as the demons plot their final victory.

    All These Beautiful Strangers, by Elizabeth Klehfoth
    Ten years ago, Charlie Fairchild’s mother Grace was seen on bank security cameras cleaning out the family’s safe deposit boxes—and never seen again. Now 17, Charlie is haunted by her mother’s disappearance, wondering if she truly abandoned her family, or if there is another explanation. Attending an exclusive boarding school, Charlie is pushed by the secret society she’s pledging to dig into her family’s secrets—and what she finds makes her head reel. forcing her to consider the possibility she never knew either of her parents at all.

    The post July’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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