Tagged: the queen of nothing Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Joel Cunningham 8:00 pm on 2019/12/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , on the come up, pumpkinheads, , , , the queen of nothing, , , ,   

    Barnes & Noble Booksellers’ Favorite Young Adult Books of 2019 

    The past year has been an amazing one for young adult literature—and no one knows that better than Barnes & Noble’s team of experienced booksellers, who each day make it their mission to connect every reader with just the right book. We wanted to know what YA books to put on our year-end must-read lists, so we asked them. These are our booksellers’ favorites of the year—and, we wager, they’ll soon be yours too. (Explore all of our booksellers’ 2019 favorites.)

    The Toll, by Neal Shusterman
    Neal Shusterman’s bestselling series about a boy who inherits the blade of the grim reaper and decides he doesn’t want the job comes to a triumphant close. Citra and Rowan awaken three years after the events of the last book, and soon find themselves on the run from Scythe Goddard’s allies and everyone who would see Rowan burn for the destruction of Endura. The Thunderhead is still in charge, but won’t communicate with anyone other than Greyson Tolliver, also known as the Toll. As you can imagine, things are pretty complicated, and moving quickly toward a world-altering climax. New readers will definitely want to start with Scythe (the B&N YA Book Club pick for December), and prepare themselves for a journey into one of the most compelling worlds its award-winning author has ever created.

    The Queen of Nothing, by Holly Black
    The final installment of Holly Black’s Folk of the Air trilogy, The Queen of Nothing brings us back to the world of the high fae—or in Jude’s current state of affairs, the mortal world. Exiled immediately after being crowned Queen of Faerie, Jude is killing time, waiting for the opportunity to return to her court and take back everything that has been stolen from her. When her twin sister Taryn seeks her out in need of a favor, Jude finally gets the chance to reunite with her king and reclaim her power. Words cannot express how satisfying this trilogy is, and it comes to an end in one last book of betrayal, love, and faerie spies (but don’t read it until you’ve finished The Cruel Prince and The Wicked King).

    Children of Virtue and Vengeance, by Tomi Adeyemi
    Tomi Adeyemi stunned the world with Children of Blood and Bone, her hugely successful fantasy debut set in a world inspired by her West African heritage. At the close of that volume, its fearsome heroines Zélie and Amari succeeded in carrying out a powerful ritual that restored magic to the lands of Orïsha. But the spell had powerful consequences they never expected, returning magic not only to their people, the maji, but to all the power-hungry nobles with magic in their blood as well. Rather than lifting up those who were being subjugated, the ritual has only set the stage for a far deadlier conflict, as Zélie attempts to unite the maji and secure Amari’s place on the throne in the face of opposition from the military and the powers-that-be. The stakes or only higher, and the worldbuilding is only more imaginative, in this epic continuation of the Legacy of Orïsha trilogy. Available in a Barnes & Noble exclusive edition featuring an interview with the author and a double-sided poster.

    Wayward Son, by Rainbow Rowell
    Simon Snow returns in the unexpected sequel to Carry On, and he’s feeling at a loss for what to do with his life. After all, if you’ve already fulfilled your purpose—in chosen-one young magician Simon’s case, that would be defeating the legendary evil force he was destined to face—in high school, where does one go from there? British boarding school kid Simon’s decides on America, and embarks on a great road trip across the western U.S. alongside bestie Penny and Baz, the object of his fraught romantic obsession,to figure it out. Along the way, they encounter all manner of scary creatures, wrong turns, and a glimpse into the rest of their lives. For a series that started out as a fanfiction experiment, Rainbow Rowell’s ode to wizarding fantasies is fast becoming one of the best series in the genre.  Listen to Rainbow Rowell discuss the book on the B&N YA Podcast.

    On the Come Up, by Angie Thomas
    Thomas’s debut The Hate U Give has spent its entire shelf life (more than one hundred weeks) near the top of the New York Times bestseller list, so anticipation was understandably sky-high for the author’s sophomore effort. Rest assured, Thomas has proven herself more than up to the challenge—not unlike On the Come Up’s protagonist, aspiring performer Brianna Jackson. As a young black woman accustomed to being underestimated, profiled, and dismissed, Bri knows she’ll have to do “double the work to get half the respect” if she’s going to make it as a rapper. She pours everything she’s feeling—about her life, her neighborhood, her family’s struggles, and her problems at school—into lyrics so good you’ll wish the book came with a soundtrack. It’s a book every bit as immediate, every bit as searing, and every bit as endearing as THUGListen to Angie Thomas discuss the book on the B&N YA Podcast.

    Starsight, by Brandon Sanderson
    In Skyward, Brandon Sanderson introduced us to Spensa, a girl trapped on Detritus, a planet constantly under siege by alien starfighters. Haunted by her dead father’s legacy as the pilot who abandoned his people in a crucial battle, Spensa determined to become a pilot and make a new name for herself. Accepted—begrudgingly—into flight school, Spensa stumbled upon an outdated starshipand set off into space—a place that proved more terrifying than Spensa expected. The action picks up without missing a beat in Starsight, which is every bit the page-turner, revealing shocking truths about the wider galaxy this young woman has entered into. Spensa will stop at nothing to prove herself and save humanity from extinction, and you’ll stop at nothing until you’ve read every page.

    Cursed, by Thomas Wheeler and Frank Miller
    It’s no wonder the buzz started building early for this one: an illustrated epic fantasy novel for teens, based on the ancient legends of King Arthur, featuring the artwork of legendary comics creator Frank Miller, and destined to be an original Netflix series starring Katherine Langford? Cursed arrived pre-sold, by the hype machine, and the book satisfies every expectation with the story of Nimue, who grew up an outcast, banished for her connection to magic. Her destiny changes when her dying mother charges her with reuniting an ancient sword with a legendary sorcerer, forcing her to team up with a mercenary named Arthur and the fey folk who have fled across Englnad. Who needs a king? Here, the Lady of the Lake is the true hero—a knight worthy of us all. The book features 8 full-color and 30 black-and-white pieces of original artwork. Read an interview with Thomas Wheeler and Frank Miller on the B&N Teen Blog.

    Supernova, by Marissa Meyer
    In the first installment of the Renegades series, readers met Nova and Adrian, superheroes on opposite sides of the war between the publicly adored Renegades and the villainous Anarchists. While tackling questions of vengeance versus justice, and the responsibilities of those with special powers, fantasy expert Meyer (The Lunar Chronicles), brought a complex love story to the mix. In sequel Archenemies, Nova infiltrated the Renegades and stole Ace Anarchy’s helmet, while readers wondered if she and Adrian would ever uncover each other’s secret identities. As Nightmare and The Sentinel, they loathe each other, and Supernova begins with Nova’s reluctant return to her role as spy extraordinaire even as she wishes she could shout the truth about her alter ego. Meyer proves as adept at twisting sci-fi tropes as the beats of familiar fairytales, making for a supremely satisfying science fantasy saga.

    Pumpkinheads, by Rainbow Rowell, Faith Erin Hicks (Illustrator)
    The author of Eleanor & Park and the artist behind Comics Will Break Your Heart (whose work can be seen in multiple award-winning graphic novels) joined forces for this delightful tale of friendship with heavy Can’t Hardly Wait vibes. “Seasonal besties” and Omaha teens Deja and Josiah spend every fall together as co-workers at the local pumpkin patch. Now that they’re high school seniors, feeling bereft about their last shift on their last night on the job, outgoing Deja decides it’s time for reticent Josiah to stop speculating about his crush (aka Fudge Girl) and do something. Soon they’re taking full advantage of their surroundings—not just sampling every delectable treat and attraction at the patch, but possibly learning new things about each other and the ways in which they relate. It’s a seasonal romance as sweet and comforting as a pumpkin spice latte.

    Call Down the Hawk, by Maggie Stiefvater
    Although some characters—and love interests—were introduced in Maggie Stiefvater’s earlier series the Raven Cycle, this series-starter is enormously satisfying all on its own. Ronan Lynch is a dreamer who can pull elements of his dreams into the real world, an ability that causes him no end of problems. He wants nothing more than to visit his boyfriend Adam at college, but his lack of control he has over his abilities keep him sequestered on the family farm. Elsewhere, art thief Jordan can’t risk falling into REM sleep, and government operative Carmen is tasked with preventing a dreamer-instigated apocalypse. When all of these characters’ lives intersect, it makes for an addictive series opener. Listen to Maggie Stiefvater discuss the book on the B&N YA Podcast.

    These are the B&N booksellers’ favorite YA books of 2019. What are yours? 

    The post Barnes & Noble Booksellers’ Favorite Young Adult Books of 2019 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 8:00 pm on 2019/12/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , on the come up, , , , the queen of nothing, , , ,   

    Barnes & Noble Booksellers’ Favorite Young Adult Books of 2019 

    The past year has been an amazing one for young adult literature—and no one knows that better than Barnes & Noble’s team of experienced booksellers, who each day make it their mission to connect every reader with just the right book. We wanted to know what YA books to put on our year-end must-read lists, so we asked them. These are our booksellers’ favorites of the year—and, we wager, they’ll soon be yours too. (Explore all of our booksellers’ 2019 favorites.)

    The Toll, by Neal Shusterman
    Neal Shusterman’s bestselling series about a boy who inherits the blade of the grim reaper and decides he doesn’t want the job comes to a triumphant close. Citra and Rowan awaken three years after the events of the last book, and soon find themselves on the run from Scythe Goddard’s allies and everyone who would see Rowan burn for the destruction of Endura. The Thunderhead is still in charge, but won’t communicate with anyone other than Greyson Tolliver, also known as the Toll. As you can imagine, things are pretty complicated, and moving quickly toward a world-altering climax. New readers will definitely want to start with Scythe (the B&N YA Book Club pick for December), and prepare themselves for a journey into one of the most compelling worlds its award-winning author has ever created.

    The Queen of Nothing, by Holly Black
    The final installment of Holly Black’s Folk of the Air trilogy, The Queen of Nothing brings us back to the world of the high fae—or in Jude’s current state of affairs, the mortal world. Exiled immediately after being crowned Queen of Faerie, Jude is killing time, waiting for the opportunity to return to her court and take back everything that has been stolen from her. When her twin sister Taryn seeks her out in need of a favor, Jude finally gets the chance to reunite with her king and reclaim her power. Words cannot express how satisfying this trilogy is, and it comes to an end in one last book of betrayal, love, and faerie spies (but don’t read it until you’ve finished The Cruel Prince and The Wicked King).

    Children of Virtue and Vengeance, by Tomi Adeyemi
    Tomi Adeyemi stunned the world with Children of Blood and Bone, her hugely successful fantasy debut set in a world inspired by her West African heritage. At the close of that volume, its fearsome heroines Zélie and Amari succeeded in carrying out a powerful ritual that restored magic to the lands of Orïsha. But the spell had powerful consequences they never expected, returning magic not only to their people, the maji, but to all the power-hungry nobles with magic in their blood as well. Rather than lifting up those who were being subjugated, the ritual has only set the stage for a far deadlier conflict, as Zélie attempts to unite the maji and secure Amari’s place on the throne in the face of opposition from the military and the powers-that-be. The stakes or only higher, and the worldbuilding is only more imaginative, in this epic continuation of the Legacy of Orïsha trilogy. Available in a Barnes & Noble exclusive edition featuring an interview with the author and a double-sided poster.

    Wayward Son, by Rainbow Rowell
    Simon Snow returns in the unexpected sequel to Carry On, and he’s feeling at a loss for what to do with his life. After all, if you’ve already fulfilled your purpose—in chosen-one young magician Simon’s case, that would be defeating the legendary evil force he was destined to face—in high school, where does one go from there? British boarding school kid Simon’s decides on America, and embarks on a great road trip across the western U.S. alongside bestie Penny and Baz, the object of his fraught romantic obsession,to figure it out. Along the way, they encounter all manner of scary creatures, wrong turns, and a glimpse into the rest of their lives. For a series that started out as a fanfiction experiment, Rainbow Rowell’s ode to wizarding fantasies is fast becoming one of the best series in the genre.  Listen to Rainbow Rowell discuss the book on the B&N YA Podcast.

    On the Come Up, by Angie Thomas
    Thomas’s debut The Hate U Give has spent its entire shelf life (more than one hundred weeks) near the top of the New York Times bestseller list, so anticipation was understandably sky-high for the author’s sophomore effort. Rest assured, Thomas has proven herself more than up to the challenge—not unlike On the Come Up’s protagonist, aspiring performer Brianna Jackson. As a young black woman accustomed to being underestimated, profiled, and dismissed, Bri knows she’ll have to do “double the work to get half the respect” if she’s going to make it as a rapper. She pours everything she’s feeling—about her life, her neighborhood, her family’s struggles, and her problems at school—into lyrics so good you’ll wish the book came with a soundtrack. It’s a book every bit as immediate, every bit as searing, and every bit as endearing as THUGListen to Angie Thomas discuss the book on the B&N YA Podcast.

    Starsight, by Brandon Sanderson
    In Skyward, Brandon Sanderson introduced us to Spensa, a girl trapped on Detritus, a planet constantly under siege by alien starfighters. Haunted by her dead father’s legacy as the pilot who abandoned his people in a crucial battle, Spensa determined to become a pilot and make a new name for herself. Accepted—begrudgingly—into flight school, Spensa stumbled upon an outdated starshipand set off into space—a place that proved more terrifying than Spensa expected. The action picks up without missing a beat in Starsight, which is every bit the page-turner, revealing shocking truths about the wider galaxy this young woman has entered into. Spensa will stop at nothing to prove herself and save humanity from extinction, and you’ll stop at nothing until you’ve read every page.

    Cursed, by Thomas Wheeler and Frank Miller
    It’s no wonder the buzz started building early for this one: an illustrated epic fantasy novel for teens, based on the ancient legends of King Arthur, featuring the artwork of legendary comics creator Frank Miller, and destined to be an original Netflix series starring Katherine Langford? Cursed arrived pre-sold, by the hype machine, and the book satisfies every expectation with the story of Nimue, who grew up an outcast, banished for her connection to magic. Her destiny changes when her dying mother charges her with reuniting an ancient sword with a legendary sorcerer, forcing her to team up with a mercenary named Arthur and the fey folk who have fled across Englnad. Who needs a king? Here, the Lady of the Lake is the true hero—a knight worthy of us all. The book features 8 full-color and 30 black-and-white pieces of original artwork. Read an interview with Thomas Wheeler and Frank Miller on the B&N Teen Blog.

    Supernova, by Marissa Meyer
    In the first installment of the Renegades series, readers met Nova and Adrian, superheroes on opposite sides of the war between the publicly adored Renegades and the villainous Anarchists. While tackling questions of vengeance versus justice, and the responsibilities of those with special powers, fantasy expert Meyer (The Lunar Chronicles), brought a complex love story to the mix. In sequel Archenemies, Nova infiltrated the Renegades and stole Ace Anarchy’s helmet, while readers wondered if she and Adrian would ever uncover each other’s secret identities. As Nightmare and The Sentinel, they loathe each other, and Supernova begins with Nova’s reluctant return to her role as spy extraordinaire even as she wishes she could shout the truth about her alter ego. Meyer proves as adept at twisting sci-fi tropes as the beats of familiar fairytales, making for a supremely satisfying science fantasy saga.

    Pumpkinheads, by Rainbow Rowell, Faith Erin Hicks (Illustrator)
    The author of Eleanor & Park and the artist behind Comics Will Break Your Heart (whose work can be seen in multiple award-winning graphic novels) joined forces for this delightful tale of friendship with heavy Can’t Hardly Wait vibes. “Seasonal besties” and Omaha teens Deja and Josiah spend every fall together as co-workers at the local pumpkin patch. Now that they’re high school seniors, feeling bereft about their last shift on their last night on the job, outgoing Deja decides it’s time for reticent Josiah to stop speculating about his crush (aka Fudge Girl) and do something. Soon they’re taking full advantage of their surroundings—not just sampling every delectable treat and attraction at the patch, but possibly learning new things about each other and the ways in which they relate. It’s a seasonal romance as sweet and comforting as a pumpkin spice latte.

    Call Down the Hawk, by Maggie Stiefvater
    Although some characters—and love interests—were introduced in Maggie Stiefvater’s earlier series the Raven Cycle, this series-starter is enormously satisfying all on its own. Ronan Lynch is a dreamer who can pull elements of his dreams into the real world, an ability that causes him no end of problems. He wants nothing more than to visit his boyfriend Adam at college, but his lack of control he has over his abilities keep him sequestered on the family farm. Elsewhere, art thief Jordan can’t risk falling into REM sleep, and government operative Carmen is tasked with preventing a dreamer-instigated apocalypse. When all of these characters’ lives intersect, it makes for an addictive series opener. Listen to Maggie Stiefvater discuss the book on the B&N YA Podcast.

    These are the B&N booksellers’ favorite YA books of 2019. What are yours? 

    The post Barnes & Noble Booksellers’ Favorite Young Adult Books of 2019 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 3:00 pm on 2019/11/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , the queen of nothing, , ,   

    The Season’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in YA 

    Sci-fi and fantasy readers have much to be thankful for this holiday season, what with all the series continuations and conclusions headed their way, including Tomi Adeyemi’s eagerly awaited followup to Children of Blood and Bone, the final volumes of Neal Shusterman’s Arc of the Scythe series and Holly Black’s Folk of the Air, and more. Eslewhere on the list, you’ll find a fantasy debut loosely based on the tale of Anastasia; a murder mystery featuring a teen with cerebral palsy; and a Camelot-set fantasy starring a witchy Princess Guinevere.

    Children of Virtue and Vengeance, by Tomi Adeyemi
    Tomi Adeyemi stunned the world with Children of Blood and Bone, her hugely successful fantasy debut set in a world inspired by her West African heritage. At the close of that volume, its fearsome heroines Zélie and Amari succeeded in carrying out a powerful ritual that restored magic to the lands of Orïsha. But the spell had powerful consequences they never expected, returning magic not only to their people, the maji, but to all the power-hungry nobles with magic in their blood as well. Rather than lifting up those who were being subjugated, the ritual has only set the stage for a far deadlier conflict, as Zélie attempts to unite the maji and secure Amari’s place on the throne in the face of opposition from the military and the powers-that-be. The stakes or only higher, and the worldbuilding is only more imaginative, in this epic continuation of the Legacy of Orïsha trilogy. Available in a Barnes & Noble exclusive edition featuring an interview with the author and a double-sided poster.

    The Toll, by Neal Shusterman
    Fans of this bestselling series know that death isn’t always—or even often—final in the Arc of a Scythe universe, so here’s hoping Citra and Rowan survive long enough to weed out the corruption they discovered in books one and two. Set a few years after the events of Thunderhead, the conclusion of this sci-fi trilogy promises to keep readers riveted, as well as provide insight into Shusterman’s writing process: the B&N limited edition of The Toll includes exclusive chapter-by-chapter commentary from the author, providing background for characters and scenes and explanations of why he made specific decisions in writing this novel.

    The Queen of Nothing, by Holly Black
    The thrilling, final installment of Holly Black’s Folk of the Air trilogy finds Jude back in the mortal world, where she hasn’t lived since before her kidnapping at age seven. It’s a far cry from Jude’s life as Queen of Faerie, and Jude is not loving her exile. When her twin sister, Taryn, seeks her out in need of a favor, Jude finally gets the chance to confront Cardan and reclaim her power. Of course, there’s the small matter of a curse needing to be broken first.

    Girls of Storm and Shadow, by Natasha Ngan
    In the bestselling queer fantasy opener Girls of Paper and Fire, orphaned country girl Lei was chosen, along with seven other girls in the low-ranking Paper caste, to become a consort to the king. The most dangerous thing she could have done during her training was fall in love—especially with one of the other consorts, Wren. But once she slayed the Demon King and earned the nickname “the Moonchosen,” everything changed. Now, with a bounty on her head, Lei and Wren must convince the rebel clans scattered throughout the kingdom to join them in overthrowing the monarchy.

    Supernova, by Marissa Meyer
    In the first installment of the Renegades series, readers met Nova and Adrian, superheroes on opposite sides of the war between the publicly adored Renegades and the villainous Anarchists. While tackling questions of vengeance versus justice, and the responsibilities of those with special powers, fantasy expert Meyer (The Lunar Chronicles), added a complex love story to the mix. In Archenemies, Nova infiltrated the Renegades and stole Ace Anarchy’s helmet, while readers wondered if she and Adrian would ever uncover each other’s secret identities. As Nightmare and The Sentinel, they loathe each other, and Supernova begins with Nova’s reluctant return to her role as spy extraordinaire even as she wishes she could shout the truth about her alter ego.

    Blood Heir, by Amelie Wen Zhao
    Crown princess Anastacya Mikhailov spends her days behind the palace walls, keeping her blood magic a secret, because in the Cyrilian Empire, those with “unnatural” abilities are feared and reviled. When Ana’s emperor father is murdered, Ana is framed for the crime and becomes a hunted fugitive. The only person who may be able to clear her name is Ramson Quicktongue, a crime lord who is currently in prison—so step one is to break him out.

    I Have No Secrets, by Penny Joelson
    The Heart is a Lonely Hunter meets Pretty Little Liars in this original and compelling murder mystery featuring a teenage girl with cerebral palsy. 14-year-old Jemma is intelligent and insightful, but she cannot talk or move, so when a murderer confesses his crime to her, she has no way of alerting the authorities. However, with a new technology on the horizon, there’s a chance Jemma will be able to share the horrifying truth and prevent the killer from striking again.

    The Guinevere Deception, by Kiersten White
    If you love Arthurian legends, look no further than Kiersten White’s (And I Darken; The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein) latest reimagining for all your royal intrigue needs. Princess Guinevere is no ordinary young woman. In fact, she may not be a woman at all, but a changeling summoned by Merlin to wed King Arthur and keep him safe. Add some jousting, witchcraft, and the perfect amount of forbidden romance, and The Guinevere Deception is the start of a new series you don’t want to miss.

    Call Down the Hawk, by Maggie Stiefvater
    Although some characters—and love interests—were introduced in the Raven Cycle (Pynch! Pynch!) this fresh offering from Stiefvater can be read on its own. Ronan Lynch is a dreamer who can pull elements of dreams into his own version of reality. He wants nothing more than to visit his boyfriend, Adam, at college, but the lack of control he has over his abilities keep him sequestered on the family farm. Art thief Jordan can’t risk falling into REM sleep, and government operative Carmen is tasked with preventing a dreamer-instigated apocalypse. When the characters’ lives intersect, it makes for an addictive series opener.

    Winterwood, by Shea Ernshaw
    It’s common knowledge that the Walker women of Fir Haven are witches. Ostracized and living in a cabin in the Pacific Northwest, Nora Walker enjoys a special connection with the nearby forest, as explained via the family book of spells threaded throughout the narrative. When Oliver, a student from the local Wayward Boys’ school, goes missing it’s Nora who finds him two weeks later. How did he survive out there alone during a snowstorm? As she works to uncover Oliver’s secrets, Nora becomes convinced there is more to his story than meets the eye. Ernshaw’s sophomore effort will please newcomers as well as fans of his debut, The Wicked Deep.

    What new books are on your wishlist this holiday season?

    The post The Season’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in YA appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 1:00 pm on 2019/11/08 Permalink
    Tags: ali wong, books to treasure, dear girls, , demi moore, elbow grease vs. motozilla, face it, Holiday 2019, , inside out, john cena, jonathan van ness, mike rowe, , over the top, , , signed editions, sisters first, the queen of nothing, , the tyrant's tomb, the way i heard it,   

    A Signed Book Is the Perfect Gift for Every Reader on Your List 

    Books make the best presents (we may be bit biased here), and for fans of a particular author or series, a signed edition makes for an even more meaningful gift.

    To simplify your holiday shopping and to help you surprise and delight the bookworms in your life this year, we’re gathering together dozens of gifty signed editions, from picture books and YA right up through adult memoirs. There’s something on the list for every reader! Below are just a few highlights—get an early look at all of our signed editions here.

    The books will be available online and in stores on November 16, in limited quantities and only while supplies last.

    Inside Out: A Memoir, by Demi Moore
    She earned fame for her iconic movie roles (St. Elmo’s FireGhostIndecent Proposal, etc.), broke barriers in pay for actresses in Hollywood, and led a personal life highlighted by tabloid-ready marriages to Bruce Willis and Ashton Kutcher. Throughout all of this, just under the surface of her glamorous Hollywood life, Demi Moore battled life-long insecurities, barely concealed childhood trauma, and addiction. In her new memoir, she lays it all on the line, from her complicated relationship with her mother, to the ins-and-outs of her acting career, to the challenges of raising a family under the watchful gaze of the paparazzi. It’s potent reminder that even the biggest celebrities are people too—and with Moore’s signature inside, the connection feels all that much more personal.

    Dear Girls: Intimate Tales Untold, Secrets, and Advice for Living Your Best Life, by Ali Wong
    Actress, writer, and comedian Ali Wong has had an incredible 2019, co-writing and starring in the breakout Netflix hit romantic comedy Always Be My Maybe with Randall Park and Keanu Reeves and releasing this, her first book. Dear Girls is a hilarious memoir-meets-guide to life, filled with stories that feature Wong’s penchant for egoless oversharing about everything from sex to personal grooming. But it also fills in all the gaps in her “overnight success” story, from her time spent studying abroad in her mother’s native Vietnam (an experience with broadened her cultural and culinary horizons) to her early days as a struggling comedian, trudging from one open-mic night to the next. Intimate, confessional, and gut-bustingly funny, a signed edition makes a perfect gift for anyone in you life seeking inspiration, or a few laughs.

    Over the Top: A Raw Journey to Self-Love, by Jonathan Van Ness
    The current Netflix run of Queer Eye has gone well beyond a makeover show for the fashionably clueless, layering in heartwarming and poignant stories of overcoming prejudice that are inspired by a cast that’s not afraid to get to the heart of the issues in the lives of the show’s subjects. That’s certainly the case for grooming and self-care expert Jonathan Van Ness, whose message has been that taking care of yourself comes from the inside out. During his childhood in a small Midwestern town, he was misunderstood by just about everyone—over-the-top and very gay even as a child, he was an easy target for the ridicule and judgement of his peers. Those early experiences shaped his unapologetic positivity and compassion, and he shares that journey in this personal and raw account of the journey to self-acceptance.

    The Way I Heard It, by Mike Rowe
    On his hit TV shows Dirty Jobs and Somebody’s Got to Do It, Mike Rowe explores the lives and day-to-day jobs—from the unusual to the downright messy—of people from all walks of life. But for this book, based on his popular podcast of the same name, his subjects are much more well known: each episode of the show tells you things you don’t know about a person who you’ve definitely heard of, from movie stars, to presidents, to infamous villains, and the book collects the best stories from the series so far. In sharing these unknown details, Rowe reveals something about himself too, whether an event in his personal life or a chapter of his stories career. After spending countless hours watching his TV shows and listening to his podcast, his fans feel like they know him—and they’ll certainly appreciate a signed edition of his latest work.

    Face It: A Memoir, by Debbie Harry
    Few rock harder than punk icon Debbie Harry, who led the band Blondie, a fusion of rock, punk, disco, and hip-hop incarnate. The deeply private artist’s new memoir revisits the gritty music scene in 1970s New York, an era when some of the greatest bands of all time were on the verge of becoming legends. Through drug addiction, heartbreaks, and breakups, Harry evolved from rock star to activist to icon, busting down barriers and making great music all the while. The Blondie obsessed won’t want to miss out on their chance to get a signed copy of this iconic rocker’s very personal story.

    Elbow Grease vs. Motozilla, by John Cena and Howard McWilliam
    Elbow Grease, the little monster truck with a big heart (and family!), is back in the second book in John Cena’s hilarious series. This time Elbow Grease must face off against giant monster truck Motozilla, and it feels like the odds are against him. Fortunately his four big brothers have got his back, and they’re ready to show Elbow Grease (and their huge foe) that teamwork conquers all! Fans who love Elbow Grease (as well as multitalented actor, pro wrestler, television host and now author John Cena) will love having an author-signed copy of this sweet, funny story.

    Sisters First, by Jenna Bush Hager, Barbara Pierce Bush, and Ramona Kaulitzki
    An earnest young girl wishes fervently for a little sister, but once the baby arrives, the tiny little bundle isn’t much fun (a story that’s all-too-familiar to older sibs—and parents—everywhere). Once she’s a little older though, the adventures start, and the magic doesn’t stop! This loving tribute to sisterhood, unconditional love, and the close bonds of friendship that siblings form will treasure a copy that has been signed by former first daughters (and twins!) Jenna and Barbara Bush.

    The Tyrant’s Tomb (The Trials of Apollo Series #4), by Rick Riordan
    In Rick Riordan’s popular The Trials of Apollo series, Zeus has cast down his son Apollo to earth to punish him, forcing Apollo to live as an awkward human teenager named Lester Papadopoulos. In order to reclaim his godly existence, Lester has to restore five Oracles that have gone dark. He’s three down with two to go in this fourth exciting book in the series, and this time, he’s off to Camp Jupiter in San Francisco where the Roman demigods are preparing to take on the evil Triumvirate of Roman emperors. Can Apollo help them survive the battle and restore the fourth oracle? Bonus: This Barnes & Noble–exclusive edition includes a full-color poster of a scene from the book and diary entries of a Camp Jupiter “probatio.” It goes without saying that a Rick Riordan fan, whether they’re Team Trials of Apollo, a Percy Jackson devotee, or a die-hard Magnus Chase aficionado, will adore a signed edition of one of his voicey, adventure-packed novels.

    The Queen of Nothing, by Holly Black
    The final installment of Holly Black’s Folk of the Air trilogyThe Queen of Nothing brings us back to the world of the high fae—or, in Jude’s current state of affairs, the mortal world. Exiled immediately after being crowned Queen of Faerie, Jude is killing time, waiting for the opportunity to return to her court and take back everything that Cardan stole from her. When her twin sister, Taryn, seeks her out in need of a favor, Jude finally gets the chance to reunite with her king and reclaim her power. Author Holly Black is a titan of YA fantasy, and receiving a signed edition of the conclusion of her spellbinding series will make any fan’s holiday memorable.

    Wayward Son, by Rainbow Rowell
    The lovable Simon Snow (who was first introduced in quirky love letter to fanfiction Fangirl and was given a story all his own in the delicious fantasy Carry On) is back in a tale that dares to ask, “What happens after you’ve saved the world, proven your Chosen One bonafides, and kissed your vampiric roommate?” For Simon, life post-battle is not what he hoped or expected. It’s less HEA, and more ennui. Luckily, Penny and Baz are on top of the problem. Perhaps a trip across the pond to the U.S. for an epic road trip will pull Simon from his slump? Rainbow Rowell is one of those authors whom fans are certain they’d become besties with if they could only manage to meet her; receiving a signed edition of one of her books isn’t exactly the same thing, but it’s still a nice to have.

    The Toll (Arc of a Scythe Series #3), by Neal Shusterman
    The third and final book in Shusterman’s bestselling series has arrived just in time for the holidays, and when it opens, things are looking grim. We find Citra and Rowan awaking three years after the events of the last book, and on the run from Scythe Goddard’s allies and everyone who would see Rowan burn for the destruction of Endura. The Thunderhead is still in charge, but won’t communicate with anyone other than Greyson Tolliver, a.k.a. the Toll. Will our heroes defeat him? And will an edition of this beauty signed by Shusterman himself be the perfect gift for a die-hard fan? We’re betting the answer to both questions will be yes.

    Check out the complete list of signed editions available at Barnes & Noble this holiday season. The books will be available starting November 16.

    The post A Signed Book Is the Perfect Gift for Every Reader on Your List appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel