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  • Heidi Fiedler 4:30 pm on 2019/09/19 Permalink
    Tags: 12 rules for life, , , brene brown, eight dates, , essentialism, greg mckeown, , john gottman, jordan peterson, julie schartz gottman, , , my friend fear, ryan holiday, , Self-Improvement, stillness is the key, the gifts of imperfection,   

    9 Books to Help You Become the Person You Want to Be 

    The right book at the right time can help us feel a little less alone. That’s especially true with nonfiction written by someone who once struggled with the same issues you’re struggling with today. The books below are on some of the most powerful desks in the world, and they’re frequent bedtime reading as well. Whether you’re looking for a pep talk or a detailed action plan, these books will help you envision a new future and grow into the person you want to be.

    Essentialism, by Greg McKeown
    This is the kind of book you’ll want to schedule a personal retreat to read each year. Its principles have guided the work of CEOs, teachers, creatives, and others who want to use the limited time we have to do work that matters. With sections on play, rest, and making choices, the book goes beyond traditional definitions of work to address the learning and work we can spend our whole lives doing.

    The Gifts of Imperfection, by Brene Brown
    Researcher Dr. Brene Brown’s work includes talking with thousands of people about shame, worthiness, and fear. Then she analyzes those conversations and transforms them into simple lessons we can all use to live more wholeheartedly. She’s worked with executives, military leaders, parents, teachers, spiritual leaders, and more, giving people the language and tools to feel worthy, overcome fear, and live their best lives. This book is a great introduction to her work.

    My Friend Fear, by Meera Lee Patel
    This gentle invitation to see fear in a new way is filled with wisdom and gorgeously illustrated in Patel’s self-taught watercolor style. Throughout the book, she shares her own struggles with insecurity and self-doubt. Quirky diagrams, personal stories, and luminous quotes all work together to prompt readers to see fear as a sign they’re doing something new, not something wrong. Keep this one on your bedside table and read it anytime you need a little reassurance or confidence.

    Better than Before, by Gretchen Rubin
    With her frank, commonsense voice, Rubin attracts readers who are eager for a no-nonsense approach to making all areas of life a little better than before. Whether you’re struggling with weight loss, exercise, work-life balance, decluttering, personal relationships, or one of the other areas that make us humans feel a little too human, Rubin offers sensible, tested advice. She’s an expert on habits and encourages readers to find what works for them, while offering loads of practical advice. Grab this book whenever you’re ready to tackle a new project or personal bugaboo.

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, by Mark Manson
    We’re taught that the relationship between work and success is linear. Try harder, do better, be happier. But life proves time and again that idea is actually just a recipe for feeling crazy and crabby. Manson offers real talk about what’s actually in our control and how we can focus on what matters. It’s a refreshing approach to happiness and finding meaning, and after reading Manson’s work, you’ll find yourself drawn to contentment and feeling grounded rather than in hot and heavy pursuit of joy. This is a book you’ll give a f*ck about.

    Big Magic, by Elizabeth Gilbert
    This is the sort of book that’s loaned, gifted, whispered about, and exclaimed over with friends. It’s one to turn to when you’re feeling stuck, longing to shrink down, and to maybe never think the words “I have an idea” again. In this modern classic, Gilbert tackles the fear that every artist faces during the creative process with wisdom, sharing the personal practices and mindset shifts that helped her write several bestselling books. And if you’re thinking you’re not an artist, she’ll help you see yourself in a new way too!

    Stillness Is the Key, by Ryan Holiday
    Holiday has positioned himself as a modern Stoic teacher, and his lessons are popular with leaders, thinkers, and warriors of all types. His latest book offers a counterintuitive premise: slowing down is the key to succeeding. With rewards like taming your temper and developing self discipline and creativity, Holiday makes a strong argument for getting quiet and turning inward, even when the world around us is spinning.

    Eight Dates, by John Gottman and Julie Schwartz Gottman
    If you’re eager to deepen your relationship with your significant other, Eight Dates helps couples prioritize time together and know what to do with that time once they’re on an actual honest-to-goodness date, so they’ll grow closer and fall more in love, rather than come home fighting. From the team that predicts divorce rates with a 94% accuracy rate, the book is packed with scientific research and personal stories. There’s actionable advice and suggested dialogue to make it as easy as possible to transfer the best practices for successful relationships to your own life.

    12 Rules for Life, by Jordan Peterson
    This wide-ranging book touches on science, nature, philosophy, mythology, and more, all while feeling personal and thoughtful. Written by a psychologist who has spent his life thinking about how to make the world a better place and help people find meaning, the 12 rules are meant to lead readers toward a more moral existence. Does the book accomplish its goal? Reviewers and thought leaders from all walks of life have both celebrated and rejected Peterson’s work. Read it for yourself to join the conversation.

    What books would you recommend to readers hoping to become the person they want to be?

    The post 9 Books to Help You Become the Person You Want to Be appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 2:00 pm on 2019/05/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Self-Improvement,   

    10 Ways to Fight Burnout and the Patriarchy at the Same Time 

    If you’ve ever worried you’re not doing enough while yet feeling stretched way too thin all at the same time, you are a human. If you’ve ever felt those contradictory symptoms of burnout and also felt forbidden to acknowledge it, you’re probably a woman. What makes Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle such a standout is the way the authors clearly identify the underlying cause of burnout. Our capitalist, patriarchal society is hard on everyone, especially women who are expected to give, give, give, never asking for a break or acknowledgement, all while wearing a smile and remaining calm in the face of impossible standards. (Just typing that sentence was dispiriting and exhausting!) The issue is worse for women of color and other minorities who live with a whole other set of impossible expectations and rules, along with being judged as women. The good news is that when we fight burnout, we fight the patriarchy. It goes beyond the idea that self care is radical and revolutionary. It’s a mindset shift that changes the way we see ourselves and the world. And perhaps one day it will change the way the world sees us. Below are 10 ways to get started.

    1. Resist the message that women need to “be nice, be strong, be polite” all the time and never have any feelings, by finding healthy ways to process your feelings. Exercise is the fastest way. (Picture yourself smashing the patriarchy for maximum effect.) Meditation, talking with friends, laughing, and cuddling with someone you trust also work. There’s power in being able to move fluidly between feeling unsafe or stressed, and then feeling calm again.
    2. Plan ahead. Anticipate problems, write lists, schedule, budget, anticipate, and execute. (You’re probably already doing this.) Now use those skills to manage the stress that comes from living with overwhelming and unrealistic expectations. Actually schedule time to process your feelings. (Go do it now!) It will help you be strong enough to keep going.
    3. Reframe challenges as being moments when you might grow and learn. It can help both in the moment and looking back. The idea is to redefine success on your own terms. Don’t let the man tell you whether you’re winning or not. Depending on your circumstances, this might be easier said than done. But the science says it truly works.
    4. Know you’re doing a hard thing makes it easier to keep going. It’s hard if everyone keeps telling you it’s no big deal. So at least give yourself the gift of acknowledging the rules are mindbendingly contradictory and expectations are impossibly high.
    5. Set specific, personal goals that are measurable, in your control, enjoyable, and you can achieve quickly. It helps you remember your own definition of success and ignore the expectations that can never be met.
    6. Recognize the moment when you swing between feeling like your goals are unattainable and being frustrated by the system. Then name it. The Nagoski sisters call it “foop.” It’s a silly word for those tricky thoughts like “I’m sure I can save this relationship, I just need to try harder. But no, it’s hopeless, they’ll never change, I’m not good enough at feelings to help them be a better person, but ugh, it’s not my job to change them! But ugh, I should change me!” (Can the Nagoskis see inside our heads???)
    7. Make the struggle meaningful by connecting it to something larger, whether that’s your legacy, spiritual calling, or connection to others. Finding your purpose or whatever it is that makes you feel like you’re doing what you’re supposed to be doing is energizing and empowering. At the very least, it can be sustaining in the face of oppression.
    8. Fight helplessness by doing something—whatever you can. Scream. Walk. Dance. Turn your pain into art. Organize your bookshelves. Just prove to yourself that you are competent and capable.
    9. Reject the billion-dollar industry that constantly encourages us to diet in order to shrink ourselves, and to otherwise doubt our bodies. Just don’t. You are beautiful. Right. This. Very. Second.
    10. Connect with people who get you and the issues you face. That might mean a very loving husband, a true friend, or the Nagoski sisters. Their book is a welcoming place after a long day, and reading it feels like the perfect antidote to burnout and centuries of accumulated injustice.

    Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle is on B&N bookshelves now.

    The post 10 Ways to Fight Burnout and the Patriarchy at the Same Time appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 2:00 pm on 2019/05/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Self-Improvement,   

    10 Ways to Fight Burnout and the Patriarchy at the Same Time 

    If you’ve ever worried you’re not doing enough while yet feeling stretched way too thin all at the same time, you are a human. If you’ve ever felt those contradictory symptoms of burnout and also felt forbidden to acknowledge it, you’re probably a woman. What makes Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle such a standout is the way the authors clearly identify the underlying cause of burnout. Our capitalist, patriarchal society is hard on everyone, especially women who are expected to give, give, give, never asking for a break or acknowledgement, all while wearing a smile and remaining calm in the face of impossible standards. (Just typing that sentence was dispiriting and exhausting!) The issue is worse for women of color and other minorities who live with a whole other set of impossible expectations and rules, along with being judged as women. The good news is that when we fight burnout, we fight the patriarchy. It goes beyond the idea that self care is radical and revolutionary. It’s a mindset shift that changes the way we see ourselves and the world. And perhaps one day it will change the way the world sees us. Below are 10 ways to get started.

    1. Resist the message that women need to “be nice, be strong, be polite” all the time and never have any feelings, by finding healthy ways to process your feelings. Exercise is the fastest way. (Picture yourself smashing the patriarchy for maximum effect.) Meditation, talking with friends, laughing, and cuddling with someone you trust also work. There’s power in being able to move fluidly between feeling unsafe or stressed, and then feeling calm again.
    2. Plan ahead. Anticipate problems, write lists, schedule, budget, anticipate, and execute. (You’re probably already doing this.) Now use those skills to manage the stress that comes from living with overwhelming and unrealistic expectations. Actually schedule time to process your feelings. (Go do it now!) It will help you be strong enough to keep going.
    3. Reframe challenges as being moments when you might grow and learn. It can help both in the moment and looking back. The idea is to redefine success on your own terms. Don’t let the man tell you whether you’re winning or not. Depending on your circumstances, this might be easier said than done. But the science says it truly works.
    4. Know you’re doing a hard thing makes it easier to keep going. It’s hard if everyone keeps telling you it’s no big deal. So at least give yourself the gift of acknowledging the rules are mindbendingly contradictory and expectations are impossibly high.
    5. Set specific, personal goals that are measurable, in your control, enjoyable, and you can achieve quickly. It helps you remember your own definition of success and ignore the expectations that can never be met.
    6. Recognize the moment when you swing between feeling like your goals are unattainable and being frustrated by the system. Then name it. The Nagoski sisters call it “foop.” It’s a silly word for those tricky thoughts like “I’m sure I can save this relationship, I just need to try harder. But no, it’s hopeless, they’ll never change, I’m not good enough at feelings to help them be a better person, but ugh, it’s not my job to change them! But ugh, I should change me!” (Can the Nagoskis see inside our heads???)
    7. Make the struggle meaningful by connecting it to something larger, whether that’s your legacy, spiritual calling, or connection to others. Finding your purpose or whatever it is that makes you feel like you’re doing what you’re supposed to be doing is energizing and empowering. At the very least, it can be sustaining in the face of oppression.
    8. Fight helplessness by doing something—whatever you can. Scream. Walk. Dance. Turn your pain into art. Organize your bookshelves. Just prove to yourself that you are competent and capable.
    9. Reject the billion-dollar industry that constantly encourages us to diet in order to shrink ourselves, and to otherwise doubt our bodies. Just don’t. You are beautiful. Right. This. Very. Second.
    10. Connect with people who get you and the issues you face. That might mean a very loving husband, a true friend, or the Nagoski sisters. Their book is a welcoming place after a long day, and reading it feels like the perfect antidote to burnout and centuries of accumulated injustice.

    Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle is on B&N bookshelves now.

    The post 10 Ways to Fight Burnout and the Patriarchy at the Same Time appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 5:00 pm on 2019/03/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , live your best life, , , , Self-Improvement, , the path made clear: : discovering your life's direction and purpose   

    Our 10 Favorite Quotes from Oprah Winfrey’s The Path Made Clear: Discovering Your Life’s Direction and Purpose 

    She is one of the most influential celebrities in the world, but even with her international clout and formidable business empire, Oprah Winfrey’s warmth and wit still make her feel like someone you could have over for a cup of coffee and a cozy yet illuminating chat. In her new book, The Path Made Clear: Discovering Your Life’s Direction and Purpose, Winfrey, a dedicated philanthropist, sets her sights on helping readers embark on their own journeys of self-discovery. In a series of ten chapters distilling what she refers to as her “spiritual laws”, Winfrey uses her own hard-won life experiences and lessons—coupled with insights, stories, and advice from a wide range of other public figures, including Elizabeth Gilbert, Jay-Z, and Thich Nhat Hanh—to urge readers to search inside themselves to discover their true purpose in life, while also asking themselves what it is they really want. This is a task requiring deep and patient soul-searching, and Winfrey is an incomparable spiritual guide. Her adages will resonate with readers who find themselves overwhelmed by the cacophony of competing messages we receive constantly through social media, in the news, and in our own personal and professional lives, and the relentless daily demands of modern life. Winfrey’s book is also visually striking, including over one hundred photographs to emphasize the meaning behind each lesson, and the Barnes & Noble Exclusive edition includes a helpful 16-page workbook.

    The Path Made Clear is a book to return to again and again, while confronting different challenges and during various stages of life. It is filled with startling and delectable quotes that, while highly readable, are also meant to be savored. While many standouts come from its impressive array of guest contributors, we wanted to highlight some of the absolute best, post-on-your-bathroom-mirror, repeat-them-every-morning quotations from Oprah herself. These brilliant, pithy quotes are part of what make her book such an essential must-read. Here are ten of our favorites:

    Your life is not static.

    The true meaning of courage is to be afraid—and then, with your knees knocking and your heart racing, take the leap anyway.

    No matter how far away from yourself you may have strayed, there is always a path back.

    There will always be setbacks.  What you are experiencing is a detour.  It’s not the end of the road.

    We fall off course the minute our intention shifts from following our heart to responding to what we think others believe.

    If you want support for your idea, stand in what you hold sacred. Those who sense your truth will rise up.

    Don’t wait until you’re sitting on your porch in your rocking chair to evaluate the character of your actions. Ask yourself today, in the middle of your complicated, demanding, chaotic life: What do I want my legacy to be?

    The goal is to get back to living for yourself, to get back to your flow. And that is not a selfish thing.  That’s an honorable thing.

    You are not your circumstances. You are your possibilities.

    Your life is speaking to you all the time.

    The Path Made Clear: Discovering Your Life’s Direction and Purpose is on B&N bookshelves now.

    The post Our 10 Favorite Quotes from Oprah Winfrey’s <i>The Path Made Clear: Discovering Your Life’s Direction and Purpose</i> appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 3:00 pm on 2019/01/29 Permalink
    Tags: amanda chantal bacon, barry michels, carly de castro, chrissy tiegen, cindy diprima moriss, cravings, crystal bliss, devi brown, , GOOP, , habib sadeghi, high vibrational beauty, juice, kerrilynn pamer, phil stutz, Self-Improvement, stephen r. gundry, the clarity cleanse, the clean plate, the moon juice cookbook, the plant paradox, the tools   

    How to Goopify Your Bookshelf 

    Queen of all things self-improvement, Gwyneth Paltrow offers advice via newsletter, podcast, blog post, and more. But it’s her book picks that really shine. Within the cozy covers of a recommended read, you can dive into the world of Goop, interpret the wisdom, and treasure whatever inspires you the most. Then you can leave behind whatever strange ideas don’t serve you. The titles on this list are all Goop favorites, and might make your bookshelf—and you!—shine a little brighter.

    The Clean Plate, by Gwyneth Paltrow
    Drawing on advice from experts and her own experience with detoxes, in her new book Paltrow offers more than 100 nourishing resources to help you start the year off eating clean and healing your body. Beautiful photographs and recipes like Butternut Squash Tacos will have you excited to find the right food for your body. Doctor-devised plans to treat everything from candida to adrenal fatigue will leave you feeling empowered.

    The Plant Paradox, by Stephen R. Gundry
    It’s frustrating to spend time eating well, only to find it’s not making your body feel or look any better. Gundry identifies the common foods we eat without understanding how they truly affect our bodies. Learn how to make simple changes to eliminate lectins, which may be connected to heart disease, gut health, diabetes, and more. You’ll be ready to eat plants in a new, more nutritious way.

    High Vibrational Beauty, by Kerrilynn Pamer and Cindy Diprima Moriss
    Taking an inside-and-out approach to beauty, this book includes mindfulness techniques, recipes, and rituals that will help you up level your daily routine. If you’re intrigued by the idea of clean beauty, but aren’t sure where to begin, this gorgeous guide will light the way. It’s time to make self-care an essential part of your daily habits.

    The Tools, by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels
    Aside from the channeled origin story, you’ll find this book is full of real-life stories and practical, concrete tools you can apply to your own life. Whether you’re struggling with anger, depression, purpose, or confidence, The Tools provide a clear process for moving forward and finding a new way to understand the universe and your place in it.

    Cravings, by Chrissy Tiegen
    We may not know how to pronounce her name or what exactly her job title is, but it’s clear that Tiegen knows how to look good while eating amazing food. Her latest cookbook is packed with recipes Tiegen uses daily in her own kitchen. There’s banana bread, Pad Thai Carbonara, and more goodies, alongside Tiegen’s classic diary-style chatter. The combination is sure to leave you hungry for more.

    The Moon Juice Cookbook, by Amanda Chantal Bacon
    With so much overlap between their audiences and favorite ingredients, the success of Moon Juice and Goop is entwined. This cookbook makes it possible to recreate the beautiful and impressively nourishing drinks, snacks, and light meals that Moon Juice is known for. Recipes include Hot Sex Milk and Strawberry Rose Geranium Bars. Gather some superfoods and prepare to wonder if you should eat something so pretty. That’s the Goop way.

    Crystal Bliss, by Devi Brown
    If you’ve been collecting crystals because they make your desk sparkle, it might be time to learn more about the meaning and power behind these beloved rocks. You’ll learn everything you need to know to choose your next crystal, clean its energy, and vibrate just a little bit higher every time you sit down at your desk. Now that sounds like bliss.

    Juice, by Carly de Castro
    Juicing is an easy, satisfying way to add more nutrients to your diet. And it’s totally Goop approved. These quick recipes will help you add more chlorophyll, aloe, and other underrated nutrients to your diet. And you’ll enjoy flavors like Coconut Mint Chip and Chocolate Almond. Bottoms up!

    The Clarity Cleanse, by Habib Sadeghi
    It doesn’t matter how many algae-spiked smoothies you down, if you’re struggling with mental, emotional, and spiritual issues. Follow the 12 steps in this book to release negative emotions, heal your body from anger and resentment, and set new intentions. The process is energizing and uplifting on every level.

    What books have helped you goopify your bookshelf?

    The post How to Goopify Your Bookshelf appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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