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  • Cristina Merrill 4:16 pm on 2018/11/27 Permalink
    Tags: Abbie Roads, , , Fatal Dreams, , , Long Tall Texans, , , , , Red Ledger, Rogues to Riches, , , , , sandra brown   

    Romance Roundup: Cowboys, London Bankers, and Leopard Shifters 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a wrongfully accused London banker-turned-duke who is out for revenge, a young lady who wants the love of her life to see her more womanly side, and a grumpy cowboy who finally meets the lady destined to turn his frown upside down.

    Leopard’s Run, by Christine Feehan
    Leopard shifter Timur Amurov is on a mission to see if Ashe Bronte is friend or foe. Ashe works in his sister-in-law’s bakery, but he’s not about to be fooled by her sweet demeanor and her top-notch customer service skills. Still, he can’t deny that he is mega-attracted to her, and that she has a calming, almost zen-like effect on him. As for Ashe, she’s trying to stay out of trouble. This includes resisting Timur and his gorgeous body and his wild leopard ways. (No offense, Ashe, but we don’t think you’ll last for too long, and that’s totally understandable when it comes to a guy like Timur.) Here’s hoping that Timur realizes that Ashe is not, in fact, the enemy, and that they both let go of their inhibitions and spend many a day licking chocolate batter off of each other! This is the latest book in Feehan’s Leopard series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Solace Island, by Meg Tilly
    Maggie Harris’ fiance just backed out of their wedding, which is no bueno, so she joins her sister on Solace Island to get away from it all for a little while. (Um, Maggie? Solace Island sounds like a wonderful place. What’s the address? We’d like to plug it into a GPS. Thanks!) Things are going well until they start to get a bit shady. Maggie is nearly run over by a car, for one. (Fortunately, she’s saved by the quick reflexes and chiseled jaw of her new neighbor, Luke Benson.) Then some more shady things happen, things that quite likely involve some shady people. Luke ends up letting Maggie and her sister live in his house, which has royalty-level security, because he really likes her and wants to keep her safe. Maggie will need to open up to Luke and give him the scoop on her life if they’re going to get close. (You can do it, Maggie!) This is the first book in Tilly’s Solace series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    SEAL’S Honor, by Megan Crane
    Former SEAL Blue Hendricks is having a rough time readjusting to civilian life. Still, he refuses to turn his well-defined, muscular back on Everly Campbell, his old friend’s sister. Her roommate was just murdered, and she’s decided to turn to the only man she feels she can trust. Blue lives in a remote town in Alaska along with some of his fellow ex-military guys, and they are all going to band together to make sure Everly stays safe. Oh, and Blue soon realizes he doesn’t want to ever live another day without Everly by his side. (That’s right, buddy! Follow your bliss and find your happy ending!) Here’s hoping they manage to keep Everly safe, that they solve the mystery of her roommate’s murder, and that Everly and Blue proceed to spend many a cold Alaskan night keeping each other nice and warm! This is the first book in Crane’s Alaska Force series. (Available in paperback, audiobook, and NOOK.)

    All I Want for Christmas is a Cowboy, by Jessica Clare
    Rancher Eli Pickett doesn’t do Christmas because a) He’s really, really busy with his herd and b) He’s still single, because he just can’t find a lady to embrace the ranch life. It could also be just because he’s a tad grumpy and prefers the company of his dogs to the company of society. Meanwhile, Cassandra Horn is trading in Manhattan for her parents’ winter cabin this holiday season. Sadly, she gets into a car crash and loses her memory. Eli finds her and takes care of her, which gives him a chance to express his more sensitive, caring side. (We knew you had one, Eli! We never lost faith!) They start to fall pretty hard for each other, but Cassandra isn’t so sure she should be just giving her heart out to the first cowboy who takes care of her. (Oh, trust us, Cassandra, you absolutely should!) Eli, once our gal gets her memory back, make sure you give her plenty of reasons to stick around! (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Pride and Passion, by Nora Roberts
    Two old fan favorites in one volume! In “Search for Love,” Serenity Smith travels to the Brittany region of France to meet some estranged relatives. She recently lost her parents, so she’s not feeling too great. (Serenity, we’re sure the change of scenery will help to clear your head!) She ends up meeting the very cold Comtesse de Kergallen and the stuffy but sexy Christophe. She needs to convince them that she’s not some horrible person (family issues run deeply with this crowd). Oh, and she wouldn’t mind loosening every button of Christophe’s impeccably-tailored shirts. In “Irish Thoroughbred,” Roberts’ debut novel, Adelia Cunnane decides to move to the U.S. from Ireland after her aunt dies. She lives with her kind uncle, who works on a huge and prosperous horse farm owned by the very sexy Travis Grant. Adelia and Travis start to fall hard for each other. They’ll need to settle some differences, though, before they can have their happily ever after. (Available in paperback.)

    My One and Only Duke, by Grace Burrowes
    London banker Quinn Wentworth was about to be executed, which was why he agreed to marry pregnant widow Jane Winston. They met when her father was preaching to prisoners, and he offered her marriage so that she’d inherit his dough after his hanging and not starve. (Quinn, you’re not a good guy. You’re a GREAT guy!) Then it’s discovered that Quinn is, like, the long-lost heir to a dukedom, so he gets to escape the hangman’s noose. This means that he and Jane will end up spending WAY more time together than they had originally planned. Now, Quinn worked exceptionally hard to escape poverty, so he’s NOT going to just sit around and let whoever framed him get away with it. Quinn and Jane, once you’ve managed to rid yourselves of any bad apples, make sure you realize how lucky you are to have found each other! This is the first book in Burrowes’ Rogues to Riches series, and it includes a bonus novella, “Once Upon a Christmas Eve.” (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Exclusive/A Touch of Heaven, by Samantha Chase
    Two stories in one! In “Exclusive,” writer Taylor Scott gets a chance to interview a reclusive author. This is awesome for her career, to say the least, and the fact that said author has a cute assistant in the form of Mike Greene makes it all WAY sweeter. Mike, you may have buns of steel, but do NOT distract our gal from this career-changing opportunity! In “A Touch of Heaven,” Regan Amerson’s mom wins a home makeover from a reality TV show, and the show’s host is right up there, looks-wise, with the Property Brothers. (We love you, Jonathan and Drew!) Sawyer isn’t going through the best of times right now, but he’s still not about to let his cranky mood get in the way of pursuing our awesome gal. Sawyer, you go ahead and beg Regan for her affections, and then the two of you can proceed to build and design your future home! (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Never Let Me Fall, by Abbie Roads
    Thomas Brown may be colorblind, but he has the ability to stare deep into a person’s soul and really read them, hence his career in assisting criminal investigators. (Thomas, you can stare into our souls – and at other places—any day of the week! By all means, come right on over!) His life changes when he meets Helena Grayse. She’s had an exceptionally rough life, and Thomas is the only one in a very long time to show her kindness. Trouble is, Helena hasn’t managed to completely shake off the baddies from her past. Indeed, the worst might be on its way. Will Thomas run scared, or will he stick around and help keep Helena safe? (Go for the latter option, Thomas! Helena is an amazing lady and she won’t let you down!) This is the third book in Roads’ Fatal Dreams series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Recall, by Meredith Wild
    The lovey-dovey-ness between assassin Tristan Stone and Isabel Foster continues! Isabel and Tristan just can’t stay away from each other, even though his world is a dark one and he was originally kinda, sorta hired to kill her. (Such is the power of Tristan’s magnetism, his passionate kisses, and his perfectly defined abdominal muscles.) Then someone from Tristan’s past resurfaces, indicating that said past might be a tad harder to leave than he thought. Here’s hoping that Tristan ditches his dark ways ASAP, and that he and Isabel then focus on building a beautiful and peaceful life together filled with love and babies and maybe a cute puppy or two! (Actually, there should definitely be puppies. A whole litter of them!) This book contains the fourth, fifth, and sixth installments in Wild’s Red Ledger series. (Available in paperback.)

    Two Alone/A Secret Splendor, by Sandra Brown
    Two stories in one! In “Two Alone,” businesswoman Rusty Carlson finds herself stranded in the very remote woods with Vietnam vet Cooper Landry. Neither of them are exactly thrilled by this, even though they are both very attractive people—she finds him a tad scary and he’s afraid she’ll hurt his chances of survival. Oh, Rusty and Cooper. Let go of your biases and enjoy this quality time with each other and nature! In “A Secret Splendor,” Arden Gentry is feeling quite lonely and sad after losing her son and getting divorced. (Sending you all of the hugs, Arden!) She decides to track down the other son she gave birth to a long, long time ago. He lives in Hawaii, and Arden soon suddenly doubts whether she should even bother. Here’s hoping that everything works out for our gal, and that she finds some much-needed peace! (Available in paperback.)

    Long, Tall Texans: Calhoun & Justin, by Diana Palmer
    Two gloriously handsome brothers find true love in this tome! In “Calhoun,” orphan Abby Clark could only ever rely on the Ballenger brothers to keep her safe. The downside is that they still see her as a girl, especially Calhoun Ballenger, and let’s just say she does NOT want Calhoun to think of her as a girl. She’s ready to prove to him that she’s a grown woman and that she has some very womanly desires. Go get your man, Abby! In “Justin,” Shelby Jacobs wants to make amends with Justin Ballenger. This won’t be easy, mainly because she broke off their engagement six years ago. She still loves him, though, because no sane woman could ever forget a man like Justin. Justin, buddy, please, please, please hear her out! She had her reasons for calling things off, and her heart has always been yours! This is the first volume in Palmer’s Long, Tall Texans series. (Available in paperback.)

    The post Romance Roundup: Cowboys, London Bankers, and Leopard Shifters appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Danielle Herzog 3:00 pm on 2016/08/16 Permalink
    Tags: it's here!, , , sandra brown, sting   

    Sandra Brown Brings the Heat in Sting 

    I need to officially apologize to my husband and children. For the past 24 hours, I have fed them store-bought pizza, let them watch excessive amounts of television, and basically ignored every word out of their mouths so I could sneak off to my office and read Sandra Brown’s latest novel, Sting.

    It’s true.

    I hated having to put the book down for even a minute to do something. Each chapter took the story in an unexpected direction, and the sexual tension building between hostage Jordie Bennet and her captor, Shaw Kinnard, made me turn pages at a rate faster than light.

    Before you look at me sideways and say, “captor?” let me explain.

    From the second this pair locks eyes across a backwater bar, the sparks fly. It’s hard to say whether Shaw has really taken Jordie hostage in order to kill her, like he claims he’s been hired to do, or to save her from a deranged scam artist out to stick it to her brother, who betrayed him. But either way, the harsh, enigmatic, and dangerous Shaw is hiding something. And what’s even more exciting is that you’re constantly wondering if the same can be said of Jordie. Innocence isn’t either of these two’s middle names.

    It’s a web of intrigue and sexual tension.

    Jordie Bennet, owner of an event planning company, is trying to find her brother who has escaped from the witness protection program. The program he was in because he ratted on one of the deadliest and powerful criminals in the city. A criminal who is out for revenge.

    But when Jordie thinks she is meeting up with her brother and instead witnesses a murder and is taken hostage by the sexy but ruthless killer, Shaw Kinnard, she soon learns that finding her brother comes with a hefty price—her life. And Shaw is the man who’s been hired to kill her.

    Yet, for some reason, he can’t seem to pull the trigger. And every hour that passes, Jordie questions what Shaw’s real intentions are, and why every inch of her ignites at his glances and suggestive tone. Even aside from her unexpected attraction to Shaw, she can’t help but ask herself just how far she would go for a brother who might not do the same for her. A brother who has never done a thing for anyone in the world but himself.

    Shaw and Jordie’s relationship not only makes each of them doubt the integrity and intent of the other, but leaves the reader asking themselves which character can they really trust. From deception to corruption, lies surround Jordie and Shaw, but that can’t stop the magnetic pull they feel towards each other. Especially when they realize they are each other’s only chance of finding the real truth about Jordie’s brother’s whereabouts and intentions. The truth that could eventually save both of their lives, but only if they can find a way to trust each other. But can you trust a killer?

    What kicks things up a few more notches isn’t just the constantly elevating sexual tension, or increasingly shocking twists and turns of the plot, but the way Brown manages to enhance the complexities behind each character. As you learn more about their thorny pasts, you become invested their lives. You feel their pain, understand their grief, and cheer them on even when you find yourself questioning every word out of their mouths. You also become invested in the stories of the sub-characters, from the detectives and their families, to the federal agents and their partnerships; as each deals with the complications of a deadly game of cat and mouse that is unfolding in the public eye.

    Sting is a thriller. It’s a romance. It’s a mystery. It’s a family drama. It’s all those things wrapped up in a book you will be glued to until the end makes you shriek, “No Way!” It’s no surprise, because Sandra Brown’s last book, Friction, went right to the New York Times Bestseller List for the exact same reasons. Brown hooks you in from the first chapter, then takes you on the ride of your life. A ride that will probably have your family looking for you after you’ve served them frozen pizza and snuck off to your favorite reading chair.

    Sting is on shelves now.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 3:30 pm on 2014/09/04 Permalink
    Tags: , cover her face p.d. james, diana wynne jones, , , , , , mean streak, michael ende, percy jackson's greek gods, , sandra brown, , , , , the never-ending story, ,   

    What to Read Next if You Liked The Long Way Home, Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods, Mean Streak, The Secret Place, or The Magician’s Land 

    What to Read 94The Long Way Home, by Louise Penny, is the 10th volume in the best-selling mystery series featuring Armand Gamache, the (now former) head homicide inspector with the Sûreté du Québec. Penny’s mysteries offer up an addictive blend of literary prose and classic mystery tropes. The style will appeal to fans of P.D. James, the Grand Dame of British mystery writers, whose most popular books feature London Chief-Inspector Adam Dalgliesh. The 14-book series begins with the author’s evergreen 1962 debut, Cover Her Face.

    Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods, by Rick Riordan, isn’t the next novel in the popular YA adventure series, but more of a reference book that covers all of the major players in the ethereal realm, as narrated by wiseacre Percy. For this kind of thing done to perfection, Diana Wynne Jones’ The Tough Guide to Fantasyland is nigh-indispensable. Written in the form of a tourist guidebook, it smartly (and smart-aleck-ly) unpacks the cliches of the fantasy genre with razor wit. Sample entry: “APOSTROPHES: Few names in the fantasy realm are considered complete unless they are interrupted by an apostrophe somewhere in the middle.”

    Mean Streak, by Sandra Brown, is a breathless romantic thriller about a woman who is kidnapped, only to discover that her captor may have rescued her from the real danger she faces from the ones she trusts most. For another suspense yarn that manages to meld sex and Stockholm Syndrome, pick up Wild Orchids, by Karen Robards, in which a woman is held hostage but later makes the curious decision to leave her family behind and hunt down the man that imprisoned her.

    The forthcoming The Secret Place, by Tana French, continues the Dublin Murder Squad series, the landmark literary mysteries that began with In the Woods. French’s novels are known for their rich characters, ambiguous plotting, and well-crafted prose, all qualities you’ll find in spades in The Little Friend, by Donna Tartt. Sandwiched between a supernova debut like The Secret History and the Pulitzer-winning The Goldfinch, Tartt’s sophomore outing has been unjustly overshadowed as of late, but you should really give it a chance. Its palpable Southern atmosphere and young female protagonist provide a good approximation of what might happen if a murder mystery broke out in the middle of To Kill a Mockingbird.

    The Magician’s Land, by Lev Grossman, concludes a brilliant trilogy about a disenchanted young man who finds out that magic is real, and so is the fantasy world described in his favorite childhood stories—but each is both less and more fantastical (and far darker) than he ever imagined. Though ostensibly written for children, The Neverending Story, by Michael Ende, tackles similarly juicy material, probing what value there is to be found in living vicariously through stories. I love the ’80s movie as much as anyone (FIGHT AGAINST THE SADNESS, ARTAX!), but the book is leagues better.

    Have you read The Long Way Home, Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods, or Mean Streak?

     
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