Tagged: Romance Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Amanda Diehl 5:00 pm on 2018/01/17 Permalink
    Tags: bitter spirits, colleen gleason, it stings so sweet, jenn Bennett, melanie harlow, michelle mclean, roaring midnight, Romance, romancing the rumrunner, speak easy, stephanie draven, the bees knees   

    Raise a Glass: 5 Prohibition-Era Romances to Read 

    There’s something addicting and appealing about the 1920s. There are scheming gangsters, flirtatious flappers, and the underground world of speakeasies. While many historical romances are set in the UK, often centuries earlier, there are also several romance novels that capture the mystery, danger, and glitz of the Jazz Age. Here are a few to get you started!

    Bitter Spirits, by Jenn Bennett
    Aida Palmer is a smart-mouthed medium, using her talents to speak with the dead at a local speakeasy. When bootlegger Winter Magnusson shows up, insisting he’s been hexed and desperately in need of Aida’s assistance, the two team up in an adventure filled with lustful exchanges and meddling ghosts in 1920s San Francisco. With a paranormal mystery and off-the-charts chemistry, this one is great for readers who love vibrant, historical settings with a seamless blend of the supernatural.

    It Stings So Sweet, by Stephanie Draven
    For a bit of variety and a more erotic take on a historically-set romance, It Stings So Sweet is a wonderful book with three heroines finding romance. Nora is a socialite, desperate to revive her marriage before it heads to ruin. Silent film actress Clara falls for a mysterious WWI pilot, who is surprisingly adventurous in the bedroom. Sophie is part of the working class and feels she will always stay there, until her wealthy boss and heir to a grand family fortune takes an interest in her. With three stories, It Stings So Sweet will appeal to all types of romance lovers.

    Roaring Midnight, by Colleen Gleason
    Looking for an element of danger during the glamour of the Jazz Age? Macey Gardella has just learned she’s part of a family of vampire hunters, turning her rather carefree life upside down. To make matters even more complicated, Grady, a dreamy newspaper reporter, has been hanging around, asking questions about things that are better left secret. While Macey finds Grady charming, her need for self-preservation and safety often war with the attraction she feels. Plus, she has to learn the ropes of vampire hunting, while dodging her inquisitive landlord.

    Speak Easy, by Melanie Harlow

    Tiny O’Mara spends her days helping out her father’s bootlegging business, but what she really longs for is to be a freewheeling flapper. When her father is kidnapped by the son of a notorious mobster, Enzo DiFiore, Tiny must figure out a way to keep her father’s operation going while trying to save him. However, things are not always as they seem when it comes to money, power, and the criminal underground. As Tiny uses her attraction to Enzo as a bartering tool, she knows there will come an instance where her time runs out.

    Romancing the Rumrunner, by Michelle McLean
    Hiding her identity as The Phoenix, Jessica Harlan owns and operates one of the most successful speakeasies in Chicago. By day, she runs a butcher shop, but at night, she’s consumed by staying one step ahead of Prohibition agents. Federal agent Anthony Solomon has gone undercover to take down The Phoenix. All his preparation, though, doesn’t account for the surprise that the infamous “rumrunner” is actually a woman. A fast-paced enemies to lovers romance with a heroine who always stays one step ahead of the people around her.

    What romances set during the 1920s would you recommend?

    The post Raise a Glass: 5 Prohibition-Era Romances to Read appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Cristina Merrill 3:00 pm on 2018/01/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , jasmine guillory, , judgment road, lindsay evans, on-air passion, Romance, , sisters like us, , the wedding date   

    Romance Roundup: Bikers, Radio Hosts, and Wedding Dates 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a handsome radio host who is cynical about love, a tough biker guy who meets the love of his life, and two sisters with their own unique romantic situations—and a very overbearing mother.

    Fifty Shades Freed (Movie Tie-In), by E.L. James
    Recent college graduate Anastasia Steele and wealthy entrepreneur Christian Grey have finally tied the knot. (As in, they got married. They’ve tied other knots, of course, but now we’re talking about THE knot.) It seems as if everything is all set for the both of them to ride off into the sunset with their best, ahem, tools and techniques, but nothing is simple in the complicated world of Christian Grey. They’ve got to deal with Ana’s crazy boss, for one, Christian’s issues, which are many, and a multitude of other things until they can reach their happy ending. Whether you’re already a fan of the books or looking to dip your manicured toe in the Fifty Shades universe, we can all agree that anything featuring Jamie Dornan’s chiseled face will cause many a double take! This is the third book in James’ Fifty Shades trilogy. (Available in paperback on January 16.)

    Judgment Road, by Christine Feehan
    There’s a new outlaw motorcycle club in the town of Caspar, and the guys in it have the women all aflutter. Enter Reaper, a guy who makes even the most eloquent of women stammer. He meets Anya Rafferty, a bartender who is working very hard to build a beautiful life for herself. She refuses to be intimated by a hot, dangerous guy like Reaper. (You’ve got this, Anya!) Reaper, a biker and a trained assassin, doesn’t want to admit it, but Anya has managed to soften his hard heart and wrap it around her little finger, and it’s not just because she knows how to make his preferred beverages juuuuust right. (This will SO get him teased in the assassin locker room!) Can these two independent souls forge a new, peaceful life together? This is the first book in Feehan’s Torpedo Ink series, which is part of her Sea Haven universea universe that is populated by sexy people with otherworldly, magical abilities. (Available in paperback and NOOK on January 23.)

    Sisters Like Us, by Susan Mallery
    Sisters Harper Szymanski and Stacey Bloom are having a rough time lately. Harper is divorced and struggling to make ends meet and raise her teenage daughter. On the bright side, she’s attracted the notice of Lucas, the resident Hot Cop. (Frisk us, Lucas! Frisk us all!) Stacey, a married doctor, is pregnant and totally NOT feeling those motherly fuzzies. Harper and Stacey also have one major problem in common: their overbearing mother who will never, totally, 100 percent approve of anything they do. (Like, they could save a cute, drowning puppy and it wouldn’t suffice.) Hang in there, ladies! This difficult time will pass. And through all of the stress, don’t ever forget that you always have each other! This is the fourth book in Mallery’s Mischief Bay series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, audiobook, and NOOK on January 23.)

    About that Kiss, by Jill Shalvis
    Kylie and Joe shared a kiss. A beautiful kiss. The kind of kiss that makes you rethink your life and grab your purse and run out of your office cubicle in pursuit of your real dream. The kind of kiss that you compare to all other kisses. A kiss thatsorry, could go on forever here. Ahem. Anyway, Joe never called Kylie again because he’s determined to live that bachelor life. Now Kylie needs his sleuthing skills to locate a very valuable missing item. As much as our gal would love to save face, she REALLY needs his help. (Don’t worry, Kylie. Just make sure you wear your cutest outfits during your mission! And lipstick. Always wear lipstick.) As they spend more and more time together, Kylie realizes that she still really likes Joe. As for Joe, he realizes that he would be a big dumdum to let her go. This is the fifth novel in Shalvis’ very charming Heartbreaker Bay series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, and NOOK on January 23.)

    On-Air Passion, by Lindsay Evans
    Former basketball player Ahmed Clark has found a new calling as a radio host, and his favorite thing to gripe about is romance. As in, he hates it and doesn’t believe in it and thinks lovey dovey people are fools. In his defense, he’s been stalked for many years by women who want all of his money. (And his body, surely, but yeah, mostly his money.) Then Elle Marshall is a guest on his show to promote her business. She creates the perfect date experience for couples. (Elle, what is your website’s URL again? Thanks!) Ahmed and Elle deliciously clash on the airhe’s stubborn and she’s a romanticand soon he can’t believe how much he is attracted to Elle. (Believe it, Ahmed. Elle is awesome!) Oh, and Ahmed’s listeners are also loving every delicious minute. A great woman AND high ratings? Ahmed, let go of your insecurities and realize that you have a woman worth keeping for life! This is the first book in Evans’ Clarks of Atlanta series. (Available in paperback on January 16.)

    The Wedding Date, by Jasmine Guillory
    Alexa Monroe has the elevator ride of her life when she gets stuck in one with the very hunky pediatric surgeon Drew Nichols. (Now THAT’S an argument against taking the stairs!) They soon agree that Alexa will be Drew’s Plus Oneand his pretend girlfriendat his ex-girlfriend’s wedding. (Drew, we’ll play whatever role you want us to play any day of the week!) After the wedding, they each need to go back to their respective jobshe’s a doctor and she’s the chief of staff for her city’s mayor. Can they balance their busy schedules with their burning desire for each other? Alexa and Drew, yes you can! (Seriously, there are apps for everything. They will help you both keep your relationship organized. But not too organized, wink wink!) (Available in paperback and NOOK on January 30.)

    What new romances are you curling up with this week?

    The post Romance Roundup: Bikers, Radio Hosts, and Wedding Dates appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Corrina Lawson 7:00 pm on 2018/01/11 Permalink
    Tags: barbara faith, brooke hastings, carolina dreaming, constance ravenlock, , day beyond destiny, her every wish, , mary stewart, nine coaches waiting, , pages of hte mind, rendezvous at gramercy, Romance, sun dancers, the great rita read, the heart's victory, the rita awards, this magic moment, virginia kantra, winner take all   

    The Great RITA Read: In The Beginning 

    It started in 1982 with four books: two historical romances and two contemporary romances.

    In the 35 years since then, the Golden Medallion Awards, given out each year by the Romance Writers of America for excellence in the romance, have evolved into the RITA Awards, and last year, had winners in 13 categories, some of which were not even on the radar in 1982, including paranormal romance, romantic suspense, erotic romance, and romance with religious or spiritual elements.

    But there is a direct line from the first winners to 2017 winners, which included some of the biggest names in romance, such as Carolina Dreaming by Virginia Kantra, Pages of the Mind by Jeffe Kennedy, and Her Every Wish by Courtney Milan.

    The romance genre has always featured women, it’s always allowed the heroine to have her story told, and it’s always valued her independence. And, now it also features LGBTQ stories as well, providing a happy ending for all those who love.

    As part of new series here on B&N Reads called “The Great RITA Read,” I’ll be exploring the history of the romance genre by reading as many Rita-winning books as possible, leading up to the announcement of the 2018 Rita Award finalists in March.

    Why this series? Because I love romance and it’s time that the RITA Awards gained the prominence of the other major genre awards, such as the Edgar Awards, given out by the Mystery Writers of America, or the Nebula Awards, given out by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of Ameria.

    There’s little mainstream press coverage of the RITA Awards (or really, the romance genre as a whole) and when there is, it tends to be of the sneering or patronizing kind that characterized a recent article in the New York Times. Why does this happen? I’ll point out romance is the one genre largely written, published, and read by women, and the state of the world, and let you do the math.

    I’d rather talk about the stories.

    I had some preconceptions of what those early romances would be like. I thought perhaps the heroines would not be as three-dimensional or independent as modern-day romance protagonists; that perhaps they would seem tame compared to today’s heroines, and even that they would end up being damsels in distress. After all, even romance readers often say, “well, there were some older romances with heroines who are passive and need to be rescued.” I also thought perhaps writing styles might have changed and the older books would read as stilted or less interesting.

    Um, no.

    As I read the three of the first four Golden Medallion Award-winning books, Day Beyond Destiny by Anna James, Rendezvous at Gramercy by Constance Ravenlock, the two historical winners, and Winner Take All by Brooke Hastings, the contemporary winner, I had a collection of characters who would not be out of place in a current romance. (I could not obtain a copy of the fourth winner, Sun Dancers by Barbara Faith, alas.)

    Among these heroines were a diplomat’s daughter turned smuggler, an abused housewife, a mother, a painter who dared fall in love with a man who valued her, and a business owner determined to save her company, despite the machinations of a corporate raider. (Yes, dear readers, millionaire heroes go back to 1982 and beyond. Millionaire/billionaire romances are not new.)

    I did find one interesting element these three books had in common: they were all heroine-centered, meaning if the men had a point of view at all, it was brief, and they didn’t have a strong emotional arc.

    In Rendezvous at Gramercy, where the heroine is rescued from a shipwreck off the French coast and taken in by down-on-their-luck nobility who are smuggling in food and other necessities for the local townspeople, the style is very much in the vein of Mary Stewart’s gothics, such as the classic (and still wonderful) Nine Coaches Waiting. The reader does not get to know the hero, though he does eventually put aside his cynicism due to the heroine’s noble acts.

    Day Beyond Destiny was fascinating in several ways. One, the heroine is a clearly abused (married to a rapist husband) who finds love and tenderness with a Greek native while on vacation in Greece. Yes, she cheats on her husband, which I’ve been told “should not be done” in modern romance, though I’m reasonably certain it could be done and done well in a modern romance. (And feel free to comment with romances you love that have this element.)

    But the most fascinating element is this book is a three-generational romance, following up with the daughter and granddaughter, and, thus, the original hero actually dies later in the story. I know! Blasphemy in a romance today. Even worse, the second heroine’s story ends in tragedy, and the granddaughter barely has a romance at all but has mainly a coming of age story.

    Clearly, readers (and writers) have cemented certain “rules” since 1982 that would make Day Beyond Destiny a controversial romance today. But it’s also a terrific book and, by the end of the first story, I wanted to move to this Greek Island, or at least vacation there. The story sweeps a reader away to a new and fascinating world, which is something we still want today.

    Next up in this series: a look at Nora Roberts’ first Golden Medallion/RITA Winners: This Magic Moment and The Heart’s Victory, from 1982 and 1983.

    Yes, Nora Roberts has been writing that long—and writing well that long.

    The post The Great RITA Read: In The Beginning appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Tara Sonin 7:00 pm on 2018/01/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , breath of magic, crystal cove, , daughter of the blood, , erika mailman, , , , , , , , , naomi novik, , , paula brackson, practical magic, Romance, , , , the witches of east end, the witching hour, the witchs daughter, the witchs trinity, toil and trouble, uprooted, , wicked deeds on a winters night, witch and wizard   

    16 Witchy Books You Need This Winter 

    You may think Autumn is the only time for witchery, but we say winter and witches go together like snowflakes and hot cocoa! If January has been keeping you cold, here are some witchy reads that will excite…and maybe even scare you a bit, too.

    A Discovery of Witches, by Deborah Harkness
    When factions of supernatural creatures set their sights on a document that could give them the upper hand in a war, a reluctant witch must seek the protection of an equally reluctant vampire, her supposed mortal enemy. Witch stories have a tendency to emphasize the importance of family…but in this case, it could be her own family that wants her dead. Can true love between two warring beings prevail?

    Practical Magic, by Alice Hoffman
    The Owens sisters are cursed: the men that they love will always die. But with that curse comes unique abilities—magic—that on more than one occasion, they have used to try and prevent others that they love from falling prey to the same fate. Gillian and Sally grew up as outsiders, always trying to escape the rumors about their family. One of them married, and the other ran away, determined never to do so. But when tragedy brings them together again, the curse is always there to welcome them home…

    Dark Witch, by Nora Roberts
    In this witchy trilogy, Iona Sheehan travels to Ireland to connect with family she has always yearned to know. Reunited with her cousins in the home of her ancestors, Iona is hopeful she’s found everything she’s been looking for. And then she meets Boyle MacGrath: a cowboy with no ties, except the one winding its way around her heart.

    Wicked Deeds on a Winter’s Night, by Kresley Cole
    In the fourth installment in this paranormal romance series, Mariketa the witch has been stripped of her magic, leaving her with no choice but to seek the protection of her greatest enemy, Bowen MacRieve. Bowen is a tortured werewolf determined never to let his heart belong to another—especially Mari—but soon enough, they cannot deny the passion between them. Forbidden love, evil forces, and magic combine for a riveting tale.

    Breath of Magic, by Teresa Medeiros
    Arian Whitewood is a witch from the seventeenth century…which means she does not belong three hundred years in the future, but alas, that’s where a mysterious amulet takes her. She meets Tristan Lennox, a billionaire with no faith in magic…and so he never expected his reward of 1 million dollars to the person who could prove its existence to ever come true. Outlander fans will love this reverse-time-travel billionaire romance.

    Crystal Cove, by Lisa Kleypas
    Friday Harbor has been a good home to Justine; here she’s found the stability she never had with her untamable mother, Marigold, and she enjoys the safety in her mundane life of running a small hotel. But then, her world is rocked by the truth that her lack of love is the result of a dark curse cast on her at birth.

    The Witch’s Daughter, by Paula Brackston
    One of the most fascinating and engrossing witch tales I’ve ever read: you will not be able to look away from the tale of Elizabeth Hawksmith, a witch who has survived over three-hundred years in loneliness, only to discover a Witchfinder from her past has been stalking her through time, determined to collect on a debt. But this time, Elizabeth can’t run: she has a teenage girl under her care, and something more important than her own immortality to protect.

    The Witches of East End, by Melissa De La Cruz
    The Beauchamp witches try to live a normal life; the fact that they are forbidden to practice magic makes that slightly easier. But when murder and mystery find them in their solitude, they decide the time has come to defy the rules and do what must be done to defeat the evil in their midst.

    Daughter of the Blood, by Anne Bishop
    This high fantasy in which power is manifested through magical gems stars a mysterious Queen who will rise to a power stronger even than Hell itself. Three men seek to find and control the girl who is destined to ascend the throne in a ruthless quest of corruption, greed, and lust.

    Wicked, by Gregory Maguire
    The story of the Wicked Witch of the West begins at birth—born green, an outcast in society, she is nonetheless destined to wield a magic that will make her infamous. This villain origin story is action-packed, beautiful, and romantic.

    The Witch’s Trinity, by Erika Mailman
    This fascinating tale of witchcraft, fear, and history begins in 1507 when a German town is struck by a famine…which one friar believes is the result of witchcraft. Güde Müller has been tormented by visions that she cannot explain…and soon she realizes that her position in the town is compromised, perhaps even by her own family.

    The Ocean at the End of the Lane, by Neil Gaiman
    This unique story is difficult to describe, but incredibly ethereal, dark, and haunting. A man comes home to Sussex for a funeral, and is drawn to the mysterious house at the end of the road where, as a child, he met a mysterious girl and something magical and dangerous happened to him as a child.

    The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, by Katherine Howe
    Connie’s summer is full to the brim with research for her PhD. But when her mother asks her to help handle the sale of her grandmother’s house, Connie finds herself pulled into a dark mystery involving a family bible, an old key, and a name: Deliverance Dane. Who was she? And why is Connie suddenly having visions of the Salem Witch Trials?

    Uprooted, by Naomi Novik
    A terrifying wizard known as The Dragon kidnaps girls in a small town every ten years—and soon, Agnieszka’s best friend will be chosen. That is, until a twist of fate results in her being chosen instead.

    Witch and Wizard, by James Patterson
    In a dystopian world of governmental control, Wisty and Whit Allgood are siblings accused of being a witch and wizard. Young people everywhere have been torn from their homes and forced to face judgment for this “crime” of magic.

    The Witching Hour, by Anne Rice
    This lush, dark, and gorgeously gory paranormal series introduces readers to the Mayfair witches, whose stories have been told for centuries by the Talamasca. This time, Rowan Mayfair is a neurosurgeon who never knew of her abilities until one day when she brings a man back from the dead. Cursed (or gifted, or both) with the ability to see the dark realm and the evil spirit who wants to come through to the mortal realm, Rowan must find a way to defeat him and protect the world—and people—she loves.

    What witchy books do you love?

    The post 16 Witchy Books You Need This Winter appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Cristina Merrill 5:00 pm on 2018/01/09 Permalink
    Tags: a wedding at two love lane, anna bennett, , blood fury, elizabeth's wolf, every dog has his day, heart of the wolf, , , kieran kramer, , Romance, , terry spear, the rogue is back in town   

    Romance Roundup: Breeds, Brewery Owners, and Vampire Warriors 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a businesswoman who meets a baron in disguise, two vampire warriors who fall in love again during training, and a brewery owner who falls hard for a single mom during a snowstorm.

    Elizabeth’s Wolf, by Lora Leigh
    Special-Forces soldier Dash was at a mega-low point in his life and career. Then he got some fan mail from a kid, and that kept his spirits up. Then the kid stops writing, and Dash realizes that she and her mother are in trouble, so he goes in pursuit of them. (He has some animalistic abilities that help him in his quest.) He finds them, and falls mega-hard for the little girl’s very hot and very single mama. Said sexy mama, Elizabeth, doesn’t have time to dilly dally, what with the evil forces that are trying to track down her and her little girl. Then she meets Dash, and suddenly realizes that having such a man in her life could only be a great thing. As for Dash, his protective wolf instincts kick in, and he would love nothing more than to create a safe, proverbial den for his new family. This book, revised since it was first printed, is the third installment in Leigh’s Breeds series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    A Wedding at Two Love Lane, by Kieran Kramer
    Greer Jones is doing very well for herself in her job at Two Love Lane, a very prestigious matchmaking agency. (Greer, you’ll, ah, hook us all up for free, right?!) She has no interest in finding love for herself, though. That said, she decides to enter a cocktail-party contest to win a very beautiful wedding gown, and she finds a date for it. The very handsome and very British Ford Smith is trying to stay under the radar. (Hard to see how that is possible considering that accent and those cheekbones but okay, we’ll play along.) Greer thinks he’s a broke artist, but he is, in fact, the Eighth Baron of Wickshire. (Ford, you can Eighth Baron of Wickshire us any day of the week!) Ford is falling hard for Greer, but he’s also proceeding with caution due to a past filled with greedy women. Trust us, Ford. Greer is an awesome lady who has her own thing going on! This is the second book in Kramer’s Two Love Lane series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Heart of the Wolf, by Terry Spear
    Bella is a female red werewolf who was adopted by grey wolves when she was still a puppy. Now she’s a woman fully grown, as they say, and the grey wolf alpha wants to mate with her. Bella’s like “Nope!” and decides to run away and do the lone wolf thing for a bit. She’s eventually followed and found by her childhood friend, Devlyn, and let’s just say he’s unlike any childhood friend anyone’s ever had. They start to make their way home, and encounter all kinds of creatures and humans who wouldn’t mind seeing them both dead. There’s also the matter of their growing attraction for each other. If they do come together, Devlyn will have to fight that pesky alpha male to the death for her. Fortunately, he realizes that some things are worth fighting for. (We have faith in you, Devlyn!) This is the first book in Spear’s Heart of the Wolf series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    The Rogue is Back in Town, by Anna Bennett
    Sam, a wayward brother from a wealthy family, is back in London. He’s ready to make peace with his brother, and his first step is to take up residence in a ramshackle townhouse. Unfortunately for Sam, the house is occupied by Miss Juliette Lacey. She wants to use the house for her own purposes, namely, to make her weird family seem just a tad more normal in society’s eyes. (Oh, Juliette, just embrace their flaws! It’ll make life easier. ) Sam and Juliette keep trying to kick each other out of the house and claim their territory, and they fall for each other in the process. Who will win this battle of wits and walls? (Hint hint, Sam and Juliette: You can totally get married and share the townhouse, although we’re pretty sure you’ll end up preferring the country life when you expand your family!) This is the third book in Bennett’s Wayward Wallflowers series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Every Dog Has His Day, by Jenn McKinlay
    Brewery owner Zachary Caine is the resident hunk and playboy of Bluff Point, and he has zero plans to change his ways. Then he meets a cute kitten named Chaos, and ends up becoming quite close to the kitten’s owners—single mom Jessie Connelly and her two daughters. Jessie refuses to fall for Zachary, because she’s gotten burned by sexy men in the past. That said, he’s very good with her daughters. (Trust your kids’ instincts, Jessie! They know when someone is good or bad, and Zachary is very, very good!) Then a snowstorm hits, and Jessie and Zachary are forced to get to know each other in all kinds of ways. (Side note: Here’s hoping that SOMEONE got lucky during the Bomb Cyclone!) When dirt from Jessie’s past comes to the surface, Zachary decides that no one is going to get to his woman or their girls without going through him first! This is the third book in McKinlay’s A Bluff Point Romance series. (Available in paperback, NOOK, and audiobook.)

    Blood Fury, by J.R. Ward
    Vampires Novo and Peyton are two of the newest recruits at the Black Dagger Brotherhood training center. (As the name would suggest, it’s a very competitive program, and everyone involved is on a mission to destroy the Lessening Society and make the world a sunny place.) Novo is a tough, scrappy lady with a body that makes the CrossFit people stew in envy, and Peyton has that whole hot, haughty aristocratic thing going for him. (Peyton, you can look down your lordly nose at us any day of the week!) Peyton gives in to his more emotional side, though, and confesses his feelings and attraction to Novo. Sadly, our gal rejects him in favor of a guy who just makes her feel, in a word, meh. There just might be a second chance for these two during training. Novo and Peyton, please don’t blow it! This is the third book in Ward’s Black Dagger Legacy series. (Available in hardcover, NOOK, and audiobook on January 9.)

    What romances are you snuggling up with this week?

    The post Romance Roundup: Breeds, Brewery Owners, and Vampire Warriors appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel