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  • Corrina Lawson 5:00 pm on 2018/04/19 Permalink
    Tags: A Bollywood Affair, , , , barbara ferrer, , , , farrah rochon, i'll catch you, , Romance, something like love, Sonali Dev, , tonight and forever   

    The Great RITA Read: The Lost Voices 

    As someone who did not grow up reading romance, I’ve been more than impressed at the quality of the books that have won the Romance Writers of America’s RITA Award for excellence in Romance fiction. Out of over 65 books, I would say only three were subpar, and those suffered from not aging well.

    I intended to make this next article in my Great RITA Read series about how romance handles trauma, particularly female trauma, but I can’t do that until I talk about the elephant in the room with the RITA Awards: The authors it has failed to honor.

    Since 1982, no black author has won a Golden Medallion/Rita Award. This is particularly frustrating since one of the co-founders of RWA was a black woman, Vivian Stephens, a Dell and Harlequin editor who was committed to excellence in romance and to shepherding the success of romance authors.

    There are things RWA as an organization and RWA members can do to solve this problem, with the first being admitting the scope of the problem and listening to authors of color.

    But what I can do is recommend books by authors of color that you may not have heard about because they have not been marketed widely.

    I’m not recommending these books so readers can educate themselves. I’m recommending them because they’re damn fine books and they contain stories that deserve to be enjoyed by all readers. I believe firmly in the power of story, that stories can change the world, and that racism is causing so many of these brilliant voices to be lost.

    My list is by no means a definitive list of wonderful romances by authors of color; only a place to get started. To find more, I would urge you to look at the “Customers Who Also Bought” section at barnesandnoble.com under each of these books, which will bring you down a delightful rabbit hole to more wonderful stories.

    Pick these up, read them, enjoy them. And let them lead you to other great stories and voices.

    A Princess in Theory, by Alyssa Cole 
    This lovely book is about a former foster child who finds out that she is betrothed to an African prince. He’s determined to find his missing bride, she mistakes him for a pauper, and a terrific romance ensues. I received an advance copy of this book and my eldest daughter (24) grabbed it and promptly disappeared with it for days, to read it several times. I can think of no greater recommendation than that.

    A Bollywood Affair, by Sonali Dev
    I met Sonali Dev at an RWA event for readers and was thoroughly charmed by her, carrying my signed copy of her book home to read on the plane. I almost wished that plane ride had been long enough to finish the book because it was hard to tear myself away when we landed. It’s the story of a young woman from India who comes to the United States for an education, aware that she must be the best person she can be to appease the prospective in-laws who have taken care of her ever since she was proposed to by their son as a child. It’s the story of a young man, a Bollywood star, who wants to break away from family traditions. The book is lush and emotional and intense and real and I loved it.

    Something Like Love, by Beverly Jenkins
    I must confess I was unaware of the enormous body of Jenkins’ work until watching Love Between the Covers, a documentary about romance writers and readers. (I also highly recommend it.) That is my loss because the power of Jenkins’ voice comes through in her fiction. Her acceptance speech when receiving the RWA’s Nora Roberts Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017 is not to be missed. I picked this book to represent her because it’s one of my favorite romance genres, a Western, and the hero and heroine have a fraught first meeting when he robs her train, a train she’s taking to escape an arranged marriage in Chicago. The hero can’t get the heroine out of his mind, but his lawlessness and the bounty hunters on his trail are a serious impediment to romance, especially as the heroine is the town’s newly elected mayor. Of course, love wins out, beautifully.

    I’ll Catch You, by Farrah Rochon 
    This one is a sports romance, more specifically, a fun NFL romance, in which a pro football player and his agent get closer than Tom Cruise and Cuba Gooding Jr. ever did in Jerry Maguire. This book is part of Harlequin’s now-canceled Kimani line for black authors. Other fantastic former Kimani authors include Reese Ryan, whose new book, Savannah’s Secrets, is just out from Harlequin Desire, and you can find a long list of Kimani books listed here at Barnes & Noble.

    Tonight and Forever, by Brenda Jackson
    This is the prolific and talented Jackson’s own favorite book and it’s one of those stories that romance does so well: tales of people who are healed by love. The heroines goes home to Texas after a bitter divorce, only to become involved with a doctor who is still mourning his late wife. It’s intense and emotional and sweet and heartbreaking and it will make you want to binge all of Jackson’s books.

    I’ve listed these books to get everyone started but rest assured, there are hundreds of wonderful stories from talented authors who have not nearly gotten enough notice. You can also look for books by Barbara Ferrer (possibly the only Cuban-American author to win a Rita), Alisha Rai, and Jamie Pope/Sugar Jamison.

    Please, make your own recommendations below in the comments!

    The post The Great RITA Read: The Lost Voices appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Cristina Merrill 2:00 pm on 2018/04/17 Permalink
    Tags: a match made in bed, , delores fossen, lone star blues, , Romance, , secrets of the tulip sisters, , , the family gathering, welcome to moonlight harbor   

    Romance Roundup: Veterans, Single Moms, and Bookworms 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a military guy seeking some R&R, a single mom starting a new chapter of her life, and a bookish lady who is about to engage is some very sexy, non-book-related activities.

    The Family Gathering, by Robyn Carr
    Dakota Jones has just left the military, and he’s seeking a bit of R&R as he decides what to do next with his life. (Oh, Dakota, we’d all be MORE than happy to give you some ideas as we sip wine on a bearskin rug in front of a fireplace wearing nothing but perfume!) He decides to have a mini reunion with his siblings, who live in Sullivan’s Crossing. He also just wants to lay low in general. No one fails to notice Dakota and his biceps, though, and he soon becomes the object of affection for many a lady in town. (Sorry, Dakota, but this was inevitable!) There’s one lady, though, who thinks she is immune to his very sexy charms, but she’s really not because that is literally impossible with a guy like Dakota. (Nice try, though!) Can he make her see reason? This is the third book in Carr’s Sullivan’s Crossing series. (Available in hardcover and NOOK.)

    Secrets of the Tulip Sisters, by Susan Mallery
    Two sisters are reluctantly reunited in Mallery’s latest! Kelly Murphy has her own thing going on as a tulip farmer. Then her small town gets two comebacks in the form of Griffith Burnett, who takes one look at Kelly and immediately gets all “Hey, girl” on her, and Kelly’s estranged sister, Olivia. Kelly and Olivia haven’t exactly been on Christmas-card terms for the past ten years, so life is about to get way more dramatic for both of them. They’d each rather get a root canal than hug and make up. (See, ladies? You have more in common than you think!) Secrets upon secrets are about to be spilled, which might put a damper on this delicate sisterhood. Oh, come on, you two! Just get over yourselves, go out for margaritas and nachos, and focus on the good times ahead! (Available in paperback on April 17.)

    Welcome to Moonlight Harbor, by Sheila Roberts
    Jenna Jones isn’t having the easiest time right now. She’s getting divorced, is facing financial hardship with a daughter to raise, and isn’t exactly jumping for joy at the prospect of turning forty. (Um, excuse us, Jenna, but you are still a fabulous woman with nothing BUT fabulous years ahead of you!) Oh, and her loafer ex-husband wants spousal support so he can go live the high life with his new flame. (Jenna, we can take care of this particular problem and make it look like an accident! Oh, you want to keep things legal? Well, the offer stands!) Jenna’s great-aunt Edie begs her to join her at a small Washington coastal town and help her restore the Driftwood Inn. The inn is badly in need of some TLC—okay, fine, a LOT of TLC—but Jenna is determined to make things better for herself and her teenage daughter and maybe, just maybe, get another chance at romance! This is the first book in Roberts’ Moonlight Harbor series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, audiobook, and NOOK on April 17.)

    A Match Made in Bed, by Cathy Maxwell
    Miss Cassandra Holwell isn’t considered a conventionally beautiful woman by society’s standards. She’s considered too tall, for one, and WAY too well-read. (Cassandra, to the rest of us, you sound like a highly-educated supermodel!) She does, however, have a large fortune, and she’s thinking she wants to marry the Duke of Camberly. Then fate steps in, and it takes the form of the garter-loosening hunk that is Soren York, Earl of Dewsberry. (Let’s just say he makes women think “Duke of who?”) Cassandra and Soren’s families are enemies—her family miiiiiight have screwed his over back in the day—but it doesn’t change the fact that he’s wanted her for a very, very long time. Here’s hoping they manage to overcome their differences and realize they could have a really fun life together, both in and out of the sack! This is the second book in Maxwell’s Spinster Heiresses series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, audiobook, and NOOK on April 17.)

    Lone Star Blues, by Delores Fossen
    Dylan Granger may be a Hot Cowboy, but his wife, Jordan, still left him to join the military. (Many cheers for lady veterans!) It turns out that Dylan had a wild night one night with Jordan’s cousin and got said cousin pregnant. (Oh, Dylan, you just HAD to go in THAT direction, didn’t you?!) Now Jordan is back in town to help raise the resulting baby, because she’s an awesome lady who doesn’t shy away from tough times. She and Dylan haven’t seen each other in a while, but the love and the feelings and Dylan’s abs are all still in place. Can they overcome their past obstacles and build a new life together? And will Dylan find sexy new ways to show Jordan that she belongs in his heart and bed forever? This is the eighth book in Fossen’s Wrangler’s Creek series. (Available in paperback and NOOK on April 17.)

    What romances are on your nightstand this week?

    The post Romance Roundup: Veterans, Single Moms, and Bookworms appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Tara Sonin 4:00 pm on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Romance, , , , , , , the madness of love, the marlowe papers, , , , , , , ,   

    25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans 

    Between fairytales, Jane Austen, and revivals of favorite TV shows from yesteryear, retellings of classic stories for today’s readers are all the rage. Shakespeare is no exception! Here are twenty-five books you’ll love if you’re a fan of the Bard.

    Miranda and Caliban, by Jacqueline Carey
    Jacqueline Carey has the unique ability to blend beautiful prose, lush world building, and lots of fascinating character development. This retelling of The Tempest stars Miranda and Caliban: the daughter of the play’s main character Prospero, who has taken them to an island for mysterious reasons…and the slave described as a monster by his master. Carey reimagines them as star-crossed lovers caught in a web of powerful people they can’t escape.

    As I Descended, by Robin Talley
    A gender-flipped, YA version of Macbeth? Sign me up! Meet Maria and Lily; inseparable, in love, and desperate to carve out a future for themselves when they feel it is in jeopardy. Maria wants to win the Cawdor Kingsley prize, but to do so, they have to get Delilah, the star student, out of the way. When Lily comes up with a plan to do so, things get bloody.

    I, Iago, by Nicole Galland
    Why did Iago insert himself into Othello’s life, causing devastation to everyone he loved? To learn the truth, you have to go back. In this clever retelling, Iago’s past is explored—as is his role in the society he exists within, as a co-conspirator in the act of convincing a man to murder the woman he loves.

    A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley
    Larry Cook is retiring, and his land should go to his daughters—but his youngest, Caroline, refuses to accept his offer. King Lear is a story about pride, family, and revenge, and this retelling brings that to life. Buried family secrets are brought to the surface, and in the end, none of its members will be the same.

    The Third Witch, by Rebecca Reisert
    Macbeth begins with three witches, and this novel delves into the story of one of them. Gilly decides to do whatever necessary to ruin Macbeth’s life, including dressing like a boy, sneaking into the castle, and inserting herself into his business. But by putting Macbeth and his wife in her sights, has she unwittingly risked herself?

    Vinegar Girl, by Anne Tyler
    A comedy, for a change of pace! The Taming of The Shrew gets the contemporary treatment when Kate, generally dissatisfied with her life, gets thrown another curveball: her father wants her to marry his assistant, Pytor, without whom his scientific research would be lost, to keep him from being deported. Hilarity ensues.

    Hag-Seed, by Margaret Atwood
    We return to The Tempest with a retelling from the author of The Handmaid’s Tale. A meta-twist on the retelling stars an artistic director of a theater putting on a production of the namesake Shakespeare play itself…but when he is betrayed, Felix winds up alone, missing his lost daughter, wishing for the day vengeance can be his. When an opportunity to teach a theater course in a prison arises, Felix sees his chance to put on his play, and put out the people whom he thought he could trust.

    If We Were Villains, by M.L. Rio
    Sometimes we forget, but Shakespeare’s plays were put on by actors…and this interesting novel combines a narrative fit for the Bard himself with the theatrical backdrop. Oliver Marks has been in jail, but no one knows the real truth of why. He was once an actor surrounded by other talented performers, but something took a turn for the dangerous in their final year at the conservatory. What is the truth? Who is the villain? Only Oliver knows, and you must decide if you believe him.

    Fool, by Christopher Moore
    The court jester always stands on the sidelines, seeing all. In this novel, Lear’s jester is named Pocket, and the story unfolds from his point of view. While their family falls apart, the fool finds a way to make you laugh despite the tragedy that inevitably approaches.

    A Wounded Name, by Dot Hutchinson
    Hamlet is about the titular character, but in this retelling, Ophelia gets the star treatment. At Elsinore Academy, Ophelia sees ghosts that even medicine cannot banish. She finds comfort in the late headmaster’s son, Dane, but together, their connection proves tragic.

    The Queens of Innis Lear, by Tessa Gratton
    This book isn’t even out yet, but I’m so excited about it I had to include it! A magical fantasy inspired by King Lear? Yes, please! Three queens battle for the rights to the throne: one, who sees revenge for her mother’s death, another determined to get an heir to secure her position, and a third who sides with her father, determined to protect him from their war.

    The Princes in the Tower, by Alison Weir
    If you’re a fan of Shakespeare’s Richard III, you will love this historical fiction novel that envisions what occurred when Richard infamously made two young princes disappear since they were a threat to his crown.

    The Marlowe Papers, by Ros Barber
    If you love Shakespeare, you should know his greatest frenemy: Christopher Marlowe. Some call him a competitor, others a collaborator…and in this novel, Marlowe reveals the truth about his death…or rather, the death he faked so he could escape being a convicted heretic. And of course, the greatest forgery of them all: that he continued to write plays in Shakespeare’s name. A rich, imaginative novel about a time mired in mystery.

    The Secret Life of William Shakespeare, by Jude Morgan
    For all of his works and his enduring legacy, William Shakespeare is still something of an enigma. This novel unravels the mystery behind his childhood, his marriage, the death of his son, and much more.

    Shylock is My Name, by Howard Jacobson
    The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare’s slightly more obscure plays (but one of my personal favorites.) About family, betrayal, faith and revenge, this story is re-interpreted for the present day where Simon Strulovitch takes the place of Shylock. His daughter Beatrice has fallen for an athlete with anti-semitic views despite the fact that she is Jewish, and eventually, Strulovich is driven to seek revenge.

    Darling Beast, by Elizabeth Hoyt
    This romance takes place in the theater, so of course Shakespeare would approve! An actress has fallen on difficult times while trying to take care of her young son. When she meets another inhabitant of the theater, a Viscount with a violent past, they both turn to one another to bring themselves out of the darkness of the wings and into the bright light of center stage.

    One Perfect Rose, by Mary Jo Putney
    Stephen has just been diagnosed with a devastating illness. Wanting to waste no time, he decides to leave the responsibilities of his life behind and travel, meeting a theater family and falling for their daughter, Rosalind. But even as they grow to love one another, Stephen knows that his curtain call is approaching…

    Exit, Pursued by a Bear, by E.K. Johnston
    This YA retelling of The Winter’s Tale involves the aftermath of one girl’s rape while at cheerleading camp. Hermione feels that she’s doomed to fulfill the legacy of every senior class in her school: a girl ends up pregnant before graduation. But instead, with her family, friends, and the community rallying around her, she defies expectations and makes the best choices for her future.

    Saving Juliet, by Suzanne Selfors
    Traveling back to Shakespeare’s time thanks to an accident of magic, Mimi and her acting partner on Broadway, Troy Summer, find themselves in the time of the Montagues and Capulets. There, she meets the real Juliet, and finds herself tempted to intervene and save the star-crossed lovers before tragedy strikes.

    New Boy, by Tracy Chevalier
    Othello takes a trip to the 1970’s in this gripping retelling. Osei is a diplomat’s son, used to traveling and never fitting in. But here, he fits with Dee, a popular girl in school…to Ian’s dismay. Many things remain the same, such as the investigation of racism, pride, and revenge. The twist? All of the characters are eleven years old, and what happens during school will change their lives forever.

    Wiliam Shakespeare’s Star Wars, by Ian Doescher
    See the story of Star Wars through a Shakespearean lens, with the Jedis, Sith Lords, and captive princesses all told through a re-imagining of Shakespeare’s play format as though it were being performed for Queen Elizabeth herself.

    Juliet Immortal, by Stacey Jay
    Here’s the truth: Juliet didn’t kill herself. Romeo murdered her to get something for himself: immortality. But in this re-imagining of the classic tragedy, Juliet may get the last word. Granted eternal life, she spends her centuries fighting back against Romeo—and that fight will become even more dangerous when she meets someone else she loves.

    Daughter of Time, by Josephine Tey
    Was Richard III as evil and cunning as history remembers him? Or was he misunderstood, forced into a difficult position by the circumstances of the time? This novel stars a Scotland Yard detective determined to find out the truth behind one of history’s most enigmatic and infamous figures.

    The Madness of Love, by Katharine Davies
    Twelfth Night is part comedy, part drama, and so is this novel about a girl named Valentina who misses her twin brother after he’s abandoned her to go traveling. She decides to disguise herself as a boy and travel after him, even if it means having to help a man she may have feelings for in his plan to find happiness with the girl he’s loved since he was young. Unrequited love, mistaken identity, and more collide.

    When You Were Mine, by Rebecca Serle
    Ah! Another character gets their turn in the spotlight. Serle’s When You Were Mine is a modern take on Romeo & Juliet, but focuses on the character of Rosaline. Remember her? She’s the girl Romeo was smitten with before meeting Juliet. In Serle’s reimagining, Juliet and Rosaline (or Rose), are former BFFs, and Rob (Romeo) and Rose have finally, finally shared a kiss. But when Juliet moves back into town, she steals Rob away from Rose, who is absolutely crushed. You get to watch literature’s most famous love story through the eyes of Rosaline, the broken-hearted, jilted former flame…and then the downward spiral Juliet sets herself on.

    What are your favorite Shakespearean retellings?

    The post 25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Tara Sonin 4:00 pm on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Romance, , , , , , , the madness of love, the marlowe papers, , , , , , , ,   

    25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans 

    Between fairytales, Jane Austen, and revivals of favorite TV shows from yesteryear, retellings of classic stories for today’s readers are all the rage. Shakespeare is no exception! Here are twenty-five books you’ll love if you’re a fan of the Bard.

    Miranda and Caliban, by Jacqueline Carey
    Jacqueline Carey has the unique ability to blend beautiful prose, lush world building, and lots of fascinating character development. This retelling of The Tempest stars Miranda and Caliban: the daughter of the play’s main character Prospero, who has taken them to an island for mysterious reasons…and the slave described as a monster by his master. Carey reimagines them as star-crossed lovers caught in a web of powerful people they can’t escape.

    As I Descended, by Robin Talley
    A gender-flipped, YA version of Macbeth? Sign me up! Meet Maria and Lily; inseparable, in love, and desperate to carve out a future for themselves when they feel it is in jeopardy. Maria wants to win the Cawdor Kingsley prize, but to do so, they have to get Delilah, the star student, out of the way. When Lily comes up with a plan to do so, things get bloody.

    I, Iago, by Nicole Galland
    Why did Iago insert himself into Othello’s life, causing devastation to everyone he loved? To learn the truth, you have to go back. In this clever retelling, Iago’s past is explored—as is his role in the society he exists within, as a co-conspirator in the act of convincing a man to murder the woman he loves.

    A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley
    Larry Cook is retiring, and his land should go to his daughters—but his youngest, Caroline, refuses to accept his offer. King Lear is a story about pride, family, and revenge, and this retelling brings that to life. Buried family secrets are brought to the surface, and in the end, none of its members will be the same.

    The Third Witch, by Rebecca Reisert
    Macbeth begins with three witches, and this novel delves into the story of one of them. Gilly decides to do whatever necessary to ruin Macbeth’s life, including dressing like a boy, sneaking into the castle, and inserting herself into his business. But by putting Macbeth and his wife in her sights, has she unwittingly risked herself?

    Vinegar Girl, by Anne Tyler
    A comedy, for a change of pace! The Taming of The Shrew gets the contemporary treatment when Kate, generally dissatisfied with her life, gets thrown another curveball: her father wants her to marry his assistant, Pytor, without whom his scientific research would be lost, to keep him from being deported. Hilarity ensues.

    Hag-Seed, by Margaret Atwood
    We return to The Tempest with a retelling from the author of The Handmaid’s Tale. A meta-twist on the retelling stars an artistic director of a theater putting on a production of the namesake Shakespeare play itself…but when he is betrayed, Felix winds up alone, missing his lost daughter, wishing for the day vengeance can be his. When an opportunity to teach a theater course in a prison arises, Felix sees his chance to put on his play, and put out the people whom he thought he could trust.

    If We Were Villains, by M.L. Rio
    Sometimes we forget, but Shakespeare’s plays were put on by actors…and this interesting novel combines a narrative fit for the Bard himself with the theatrical backdrop. Oliver Marks has been in jail, but no one knows the real truth of why. He was once an actor surrounded by other talented performers, but something took a turn for the dangerous in their final year at the conservatory. What is the truth? Who is the villain? Only Oliver knows, and you must decide if you believe him.

    Fool, by Christopher Moore
    The court jester always stands on the sidelines, seeing all. In this novel, Lear’s jester is named Pocket, and the story unfolds from his point of view. While their family falls apart, the fool finds a way to make you laugh despite the tragedy that inevitably approaches.

    A Wounded Name, by Dot Hutchinson
    Hamlet is about the titular character, but in this retelling, Ophelia gets the star treatment. At Elsinore Academy, Ophelia sees ghosts that even medicine cannot banish. She finds comfort in the late headmaster’s son, Dane, but together, their connection proves tragic.

    The Queens of Innis Lear, by Tessa Gratton
    This book isn’t even out yet, but I’m so excited about it I had to include it! A magical fantasy inspired by King Lear? Yes, please! Three queens battle for the rights to the throne: one, who sees revenge for her mother’s death, another determined to get an heir to secure her position, and a third who sides with her father, determined to protect him from their war.

    The Princes in the Tower, by Alison Weir
    If you’re a fan of Shakespeare’s Richard III, you will love this historical fiction novel that envisions what occurred when Richard infamously made two young princes disappear since they were a threat to his crown.

    The Marlowe Papers, by Ros Barber
    If you love Shakespeare, you should know his greatest frenemy: Christopher Marlowe. Some call him a competitor, others a collaborator…and in this novel, Marlowe reveals the truth about his death…or rather, the death he faked so he could escape being a convicted heretic. And of course, the greatest forgery of them all: that he continued to write plays in Shakespeare’s name. A rich, imaginative novel about a time mired in mystery.

    The Secret Life of William Shakespeare, by Jude Morgan
    For all of his works and his enduring legacy, William Shakespeare is still something of an enigma. This novel unravels the mystery behind his childhood, his marriage, the death of his son, and much more.

    Shylock is My Name, by Howard Jacobson
    The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare’s slightly more obscure plays (but one of my personal favorites.) About family, betrayal, faith and revenge, this story is re-interpreted for the present day where Simon Strulovitch takes the place of Shylock. His daughter Beatrice has fallen for an athlete with anti-semitic views despite the fact that she is Jewish, and eventually, Strulovich is driven to seek revenge.

    Darling Beast, by Elizabeth Hoyt
    This romance takes place in the theater, so of course Shakespeare would approve! An actress has fallen on difficult times while trying to take care of her young son. When she meets another inhabitant of the theater, a Viscount with a violent past, they both turn to one another to bring themselves out of the darkness of the wings and into the bright light of center stage.

    One Perfect Rose, by Mary Jo Putney
    Stephen has just been diagnosed with a devastating illness. Wanting to waste no time, he decides to leave the responsibilities of his life behind and travel, meeting a theater family and falling for their daughter, Rosalind. But even as they grow to love one another, Stephen knows that his curtain call is approaching…

    Exit, Pursued by a Bear, by E.K. Johnston
    This YA retelling of The Winter’s Tale involves the aftermath of one girl’s rape while at cheerleading camp. Hermione feels that she’s doomed to fulfill the legacy of every senior class in her school: a girl ends up pregnant before graduation. But instead, with her family, friends, and the community rallying around her, she defies expectations and makes the best choices for her future.

    Saving Juliet, by Suzanne Selfors
    Traveling back to Shakespeare’s time thanks to an accident of magic, Mimi and her acting partner on Broadway, Troy Summer, find themselves in the time of the Montagues and Capulets. There, she meets the real Juliet, and finds herself tempted to intervene and save the star-crossed lovers before tragedy strikes.

    New Boy, by Tracy Chevalier
    Othello takes a trip to the 1970’s in this gripping retelling. Osei is a diplomat’s son, used to traveling and never fitting in. But here, he fits with Dee, a popular girl in school…to Ian’s dismay. Many things remain the same, such as the investigation of racism, pride, and revenge. The twist? All of the characters are eleven years old, and what happens during school will change their lives forever.

    Wiliam Shakespeare’s Star Wars, by Ian Doescher
    See the story of Star Wars through a Shakespearean lens, with the Jedis, Sith Lords, and captive princesses all told through a re-imagining of Shakespeare’s play format as though it were being performed for Queen Elizabeth herself.

    Juliet Immortal, by Stacey Jay
    Here’s the truth: Juliet didn’t kill herself. Romeo murdered her to get something for himself: immortality. But in this re-imagining of the classic tragedy, Juliet may get the last word. Granted eternal life, she spends her centuries fighting back against Romeo—and that fight will become even more dangerous when she meets someone else she loves.

    Daughter of Time, by Josephine Tey
    Was Richard III as evil and cunning as history remembers him? Or was he misunderstood, forced into a difficult position by the circumstances of the time? This novel stars a Scotland Yard detective determined to find out the truth behind one of history’s most enigmatic and infamous figures.

    The Madness of Love, by Katharine Davies
    Twelfth Night is part comedy, part drama, and so is this novel about a girl named Valentina who misses her twin brother after he’s abandoned her to go traveling. She decides to disguise herself as a boy and travel after him, even if it means having to help a man she may have feelings for in his plan to find happiness with the girl he’s loved since he was young. Unrequited love, mistaken identity, and more collide.

    When You Were Mine, by Rebecca Serle
    Ah! Another character gets their turn in the spotlight. Serle’s When You Were Mine is a modern take on Romeo & Juliet, but focuses on the character of Rosaline. Remember her? She’s the girl Romeo was smitten with before meeting Juliet. In Serle’s reimagining, Juliet and Rosaline (or Rose), are former BFFs, and Rob (Romeo) and Rose have finally, finally shared a kiss. But when Juliet moves back into town, she steals Rob away from Rose, who is absolutely crushed. You get to watch literature’s most famous love story through the eyes of Rosaline, the broken-hearted, jilted former flame…and then the downward spiral Juliet sets herself on.

    What are your favorite Shakespearean retellings?

    The post 25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Cristina Merrill 2:00 pm on 2018/04/10 Permalink
    Tags: fearless in texas, hold back the dark, it must be love, , kari lynn dell, , kitty curran, larissa zageris, , my lady's choosing: an interactive romance novel, , play for keeps, Romance, ,   

    Romance Roundup: Rodeo Bullfighters, Heiresses, and Basketball Scandals 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a human woman with the hots for a sexy vampire, a chief deputy lady with some nasty killings to investigate, and an immersive romance novel that makes YOU the heroine!

    Hold Back the Dark, by Kay Hooper
    Residents of Prosperity, North Carolina are killing each other off and waking up with zero memories of what they did. (Yeah, everyone’s pretty much in crisis mode.) Enter our gal, Chief Deputy Katie Cole. She knows she can’t handle all of this on her own, and so she’s working with Sheriff Jackson Archer. They’re also getting some much-needed help in the form of the Special Crimes Unit. Everyone’s getting deeper and deeper into a giant murder mystery mess, so they’re going to have to think fast and work together in order to solve it—and stay alive. This is the latest book in Hooper’s Bishop Special Crimes Unit series. (Available in hardcover, audiobook, and NOOK.)

    My Lady’s Choosing: An Interactive Romance Novel, by Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris
    Romance readers who want a more immersive reading experience will get a kick out of this yarn! Let’s put it this way: YOU are the protagonist in your very own historical romance. Imagine you’re a 19th century heroine, and you’re flat broke BUT you’re also really cute and smart AND the courtship season has begun. This means there are games to be played, villains to defeat, bad relations to ditch, and hearts to be won. You’ve got this. You passed high school algebra. You can find true love AND a secure future. You can choose Sir Benedict Granville, Lord Garraway Craven, or Captain Angus McTaggart (who sounds Scottish, so there’s MY path), to name three possibilities. So tighten your garter, practice your curtsy, adjust your bonnet, swish open your most elegant fan, and get ready for some adventure! (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Fearless in Texas, by Kari Lynn Dell
    Wyatt Darrington is a rodeo bullfighter, and let’s just say he’s got that whole protective streak down pat. (Wyatt, we’d lend you a helping hand out of the bullpen any day of the week!) He’s tough and strong, but he’s always had a soft spot for Melanie Brookman. She’s a tough Texas lady, and she doesn’t have time to mess around. (Show us all your confident ways, Melanie!) She’s going through a rough time, though, so as much as it pains her, she’ll need to accept some help from Wyatt. (Oh, Melanie, don’t fight it! You are one lucky woman.) Here’s hoping Melanie realizes that Wyatt will make sure she stays safe no matter what. And that Wyatt puts all of that rodeo experience into some very practical and, ahem, sexy practice. This is the fourth book in Dell’s Texas Rodeo series. (Available in paperback, audiobook, and NOOK.)

    It Must be Love, by Nicki Night
    Heiress Jewel Chandler has a very specific set of requirements when it comes to having a boyfriend. (Good for you, Jewel! Never settle!) Sadly, Sterling Bishop does not meet all of her requirements, mainly because he has a kid and an ex-wife. This is a tad confusing, because Sterling is an exceptionally great guy with a body any woman would want to slather with warm caramel sauce and go to town on. He also has major feelings for Jewel, and he’s going to work his magic every day—and night, especially night—to make her realize that they would be perfect together. (Go for it, buddy!) Can Sterling convince Jewel? And will she realize that he’s completely, totally the guy for her? This is the third book in Night’s Chandler Legacy series. (Available in paperback and NOOK on April 17.)

    Play for Keeps, by Maggie Wells
    Tyrell Ransom just landed a gig as a men’s head basketball coach, but scandal threatens to darken his prospects. Photos of his ex-wife and one of his players have gone viral, and not in a good way. (Tyrell, who do you need/want us to troll? Just point us in the right direction, because we’ve got your back!) Enter Millie Jenkins, a public relations wizard who has GOT to put the magic spin on things, pronto. (The media is all over the story, and poor Tyrell’s every move is being dogged.) Tyrell and Millie will need to work very closely together if they are going to weather this Very Bad PR Situation. (To start, they can draft press releases together in bed. Nekkid. Talk about making the best out of a bad situation!) This is the second book in Wells’ Love Games series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    The Thief, by J.R. Ward
    Sola Morte used to be on the wrong side of the law (think cat burglary and safecracking) but now she’s gone clean and is focused on taking care of her granny. She hasn’t forgotten Assail, though. He’s a vampire, and let’s just say that futures between vampires and human women are NOT looking too bright. She needs to stay away from him. Then Assail ends up in a coma, and his cousins ask Sola to chill by his bedside and give him a reason to keep going. (Oh, that we all had that chance!) Then she finds herself in the middle of a war that involves vampires and vampire enemies and lots and lots of fangs and teeth. Here’s hoping she manages to survive this vampire war—and that she and Assail figure out their future together ASAP! This is the latest book in Ward’s extensive Black Dagger Brotherhood series. (Available in hardcover, audiobook, and NOOK on April 10.)

    What romance novels are you reading this week?

    The post Romance Roundup: Rodeo Bullfighters, Heiresses, and Basketball Scandals appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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