Tagged: nonfiction Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Heidi Fiedler 3:00 pm on 2017/09/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , atlas obscura, , , , , , , , , , , , , , eric meole, ettore pettinaroli, , , , , ireland: a luminous beauty, , james gracie, joel anderson, , , , , , , , , nonfiction, , , , paris in color, , , sebastiao salgado, , , , , , , , , , , the world’s great wonders, this land, , , , , , ,   

    50 Must-Have Coffee Table Books for the Armchair Traveler 

    For those who know exactly what they would do if they won the lottery (buy a gorgeous house, quit working, and travel the world!), this collection of books is a passport to colorful daydreams, exotic foods, and amazing experiences that can only be found far from home. But if your day job is still your job job, take a virtual trip via one of these classic photography books. You’re sure to return, if not rested, at least inspired.

    Atlas Obscura, by Joshua Foer, Ella Morton, and Dylan Thuras
    From the creators of the popular website comes a book with profiles of 700 of the strangest (and most interesting!) places on Earth. Covering everything from a pub inside a baobob tree to a bone museum in Italy, each entry is sure to disgust, intrigue, amuse, delight, or amaze you.

    Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travel, by Lonely Planet
    So many places and so little time to see them…so let the experts at Lonely Planet rank them for you. Never worry about whether you should see Budapest before Birmingham again!

    1000 Places to See Before You Die, by Patricia Schultz
    If for some reason you’ve run out of places to see, consult the ultimate checklist and get back out there. This guide will inspire budget travelers, thrill seekers, and cultural anthropologists alike.

    Humans of New York: Stories, by Brandon Stanton
    Profound, real, and empathetic, Stanton has a talent for turning interviews into heart-to-heart sessions that reveal just how similar we all are, whether we spend our days in New York City, abroad, or in our armchairs.

    Paris in Bloom, by Georgianna Lane
    Take the most beautiful city in the world and add flowers? Ooh la la! This gorgeous collection of photographs celebrates the flower markets, gardens, and other floral focal points of the city. Très belle!

    Wild Beautiful Places, by National Geographic
    Step into the National Geographic archives with this collection of vintage photographs that capture Nature at her best. Including interviews with the photographers, this book will inspire you to improve your own skills.

    Beaches, by Gray Malin
    Photographed by a favorite in the fashion industry, The Hamptons, Capri, the Amalfi Coast, and more are all on display in these masterful aerial shots that show off the easy breezy glam that is life at the beach.

    Drives of a Lifetime, by National Geographic
    Whether you’re flying solo or with someone you love, there’s nothing better than a road trip. As much a collection of gorgeous photographs as it is a travel planner, this book will guide you onto the open road with expert advice, solid maps, and the detours dreams are made of.

    Both Sides of Sunset, by Jane Brown and Marla Hamburg Kennedy
    Photographs from masters like Julian Schulman and Lee Friedlander come together to reveal the many layers of Los Angeles, a city that can be as sinful as it is sunny. This book is the next best thing to landing at LAX.

    Secret Journeys of a Lifetime, by National Geographic
    Top Ten lists, large photographs, maps, and informative sidebars make this a practical guide to deeper travel. With chapters titled “Spiritual Havens,” “Hidden Treasures,” and “The Road Less Travelled,” you’ll step into a world that is missed by many but never forgotten by those who discover it.

    The National Parks, by Dayton Duncan and Ken Burns
    This is a behind-the-scenes look at the PBS special that celebrates Acadia, Denali, the Everglades and more national treasures, as well as a lavish visual history of the parks themselves. With the same democratic spirit as the TV series, this is a book for everyone.

    Paris in Color, by Nichole Robertson
    Bleu, rouge, vert, gris, noir! They’re all found in Paris. Take a colorful tour of artists’ favorite city. Organized by color, this book is sure to have you seeing even your own neighborhood with new eyes!

    Treasured Lands, by Q.T. Luong
    Having logged over 300 trips to the national parks, Luong is an expert on capturing their beauty and majesty. This collection of hundreds of photographs includes captions that explain his process and vision for protecting this magnificent land.

    This Land, by Jack Spencer
    Inspired by the attacks on September 11th, Spencer committed to creating a portrait of America. The project took him to churches, monuments, and the vast landscapes this country is known for. The resulting variety represents the diversity and wonder that is found here.

    Abandoned Places, by Kieron Connolly
    There’s something magnetic about images of ghost towns, rusty amusement parks, and abandoned hospitals. Both haunting and peaceful, they each tell a story, and Connolly’s more than 200 photographs are exceptional examples of the genre.

    Castles from the Air, by Giampiero Gianazza
    Often a favorite on any itinerary, castles represent our ability to create great things: community, architecture, and history. This book presents these ancient buildings with a fresh aerial perspective that will leave you eager to roam the real thing and admire their ingenuity and grace in person.

    Overview, by Benjamin Grant
    Using satellite images to make the astronaut perspective available to Earthbound armchair travelers, this collection of over 200 images reveals our planet in ways we’ve never seen before. Distant views of familiar buildings, landscapes, and more are sure to inspire you to see the world with new eyes, wherever you go.

    Bridges, by David Plowden
    Like a building or a monument, a bridge says something about the people who built it. This tour of American bridges celebrates the beauty, engineering, and spirit of collaboration they embody.

    12 Photographic Journeys: Iran in the 21st Century, by Anahita Ghabaian
    A variety of photographers come together to reveal the people of Iran, who live at the crossroads of traditional and modern life found in malls, cafes, mosques, and more. This is a thoughtful look at a beautiful country that is often misunderstood by outsiders.

    Passage to Israel, by Karen Lehrman
    Inspired by the land, light, and people of Israel, this book captures the deserts, cities, and spirit of this ancient place. Seen from the perspective of over 30 photographers, this collection will have you longing to see the country for yourself.

    London’s Waterfront, by Nicholas Waldemar Reed
    Some coffee-table books are sweeping in scope. Others reveal the intimate details of a hidden world. This book shines a light on a favorite section of London that’s so familiar, it’s easy to take it for granted. Instead learn the history of this area and study detailed drawings, so you’ll never pass by unaware again.

    Africa, by Sebastião Salgado
    With a photojournalist’s eye for truth, this collection of black-and-white photographs reveals the many people, places, animals, and truths that make up Africa. Text by African writer Mia Couto provides a perspective that foreigners must hear.

    The New Paris, by Lindsey Tramuta
    Of course, the traditions we know and love are alive and well in France. But Paris is also home to a vibrant, blossoming culture that welcomes new ideas, cultures, and people. Discover the new Paris with this warm collection of photographs and essays.

    The Japanese Garden, by Sophie Walker
    At over 300 pages, this book handles 800 years of Japanese gardening with the same deft elegance the masters bring to their gardens. Essays examine the meaning, technique, and care that is found in small and large landscapes that are expertly curated. Prepare to be inspired.

    Earth From Above, by Yann Arthus-Bertrand
    Created in partnership with UNESCO, this collection of aerial photographs is designed to evoke wonder and awe for our beautiful planet. And with over 200 images that present the Earth from a new, sometimes tender, other times grand, perspective, mission accomplished.

    The Hidden Himalayas, by Thomas L Kelly
    Travel where few Westerners have been before. The struggles, spirituality, and strength of the people of Humla are all on display in this evocative book that captures a hidden world that only the most intrepid travelers have seen.

    Spectacular Scotland, by James Gracie
    If you can tear yourself away from the Outlander series long enough to contemplate actually visiting Scotland, this book will have you longing to book a ticket straight away. The highlands, lochs, castles, glens, and villages are all captured here with Gracie’s sharp eye.

    New York, by Gabriela Kogan
    This is the New York that feels at once intimidating, inspiring, and utterly familiar all at once. It’s the New York you can only come to know by living in the city. And it’s here for admiring. Or not. New York doesn’t care. It’s just going to keep doing its thing, and Kogan will record it with her camera.

    59 Illustrated National Parks, by Nathan Anderson and Joel Anderson
    Designed in honor of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, this book includes keepsake posters, historic photographs, maps, tips on making the most of a visit to the parks, and a look at the history of these special places that belong to all of us.

    India, by Eric Meole
    India is an epic country, and at nearly 300 pages, this book honors the variety, magic, and history of the country. Meole took nearly 25,000 photographs (and curated them ruthlessly) to capture this place that has inspired people for thousands of years, including the writers who have contributed poems, essays, and more for this book.

    The World’s Great Wonders, by Lonely Planet
    If you’ve ever wondered “How did they do that?” Or “What could cause that?”, read on in this expansive yet informative book that reveals the how and why behind famous sites like the Grand Canyon, Stonehenge, and even the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Then impress your tour mates, or at least whoever you’re sharing the dinner table with.

    Ireland: A Luminous Beauty, by Peter Harbison and Leslie Conron Carola
    The stunning soft light of Ireland is at the center of this book. Everything from castle ruins to vast meadows appears nearly magical in this gorgeous glow. Prepare to sigh with pleasure.

    EarthArt, by Bernhard Edmaier
    Taking a cue from the color wheel, Edmaier has traveled around the world to capture the land from above in all its many hues. The natural beauty of Iceland, New Zealand, Chile, and more are proudly on full display, like a peacock unfolding his feathers.

    California the Beautiful, by Galen Rowell
    If you can’t afford a trip to the west coast, enjoy this road-trip-in-a-book that’s filled with sunsets, beaches, valleys, and that famous Sunshine State sparkle. Words by John Muir, Maya Angelou, Joan Didion and other luminaries add meaning to the experience.

    100 Places to Go Before They Disappear, by Co+Life
    If you don’t already feel excited to take a trip, perhaps a sense of urgency will push you to take action. Tragic but true, many of the world’s most beautiful and interesting places are sinking, being buried, or otherwise destroyed by human activity. Add the Great Barrier Reef, French vineyards, and of course, Venice to your list—quickly. The gorgeous photographs in this book will remind you why.

    Cairo Illustrated, by Michael Haag
    A unique mix of ancient and modern, sacred and commercial, gritty and beautiful, Cairo is a place that deserves a special spot, either abroad or on your bookshelf. This guide includes 150 dazzling photographs and informative introductions to mosques, markets, mosaics, and more.

    Steve McCurry: The Iconic Photographs, by Steve McCurry
    You may not know his name, but legendary photographer Steve McCurry’s images are unforgettable. Taken during his travels around the world, this collection reveals his unique vision of the human condition and what makes us, along with the world, so very beautiful.

    Great Houses of Havana, by Hermes Mallea
    With the travel ban lifted, it’s time to indulge in all things Cuba, including this gorgeous celebration of Havana architecture. Stately, colorful, and stylish, sugar plantations, mansions, and grand houses are on display here, as is a sophisticated look inside Cuba’s culture.

    My Nepenthe, by Romney Steele
    Even more compelling after the recent landslides in the area, this personal take on Big Sur and Nepenthe, the restaurant with the famous lookout, is one to savor. The recipes, family stories, and musings on what makes Big Sur so very special will transport you.

    Bhutan, by Matthieu Richard
    Richard has been invited into some of the world’s most isolated places. Here he reveals the color, courage, and creativity that are part of daily life in Bhutan, the land of the thunder dragon and national happiness.

    One Planet, by Lonely Planet
    You can almost hear Bob Marley singing “Let’s get together and feel alright,” as you flip through the pages of this book. It’s a beautiful gallery of images that makes a simple but important point: Wherever you go, we’re more similar than different.

    Spectacular China, by Nigel Cameron
    The best Chinese photographers have come together to show off their homeland with 180 colorful images, including many that unfold into panoramic posters. From ancient treasures to contemporary cities, you’ll never look at this country the same way again.

    Italy, by Ettore Pettinaroli
    Wander through the hills of Tuscany, the museums of Florence, and the canals of Venice in this stunning ode to Italy. With an insider’s knowledge, you can plan a Roman holiday or simply escape into the gorgeous vistas that Italy is beloved for.

    Tony Hillerman’s Landscape, by Anne Hillerman
    Author Tony Hillerman’s daughter has captured the New Mexico and Arizona deserts that play such a strong role in her father’s detective novels. With quotes from Tony, a history of the region, and insights into traditional Native American ceremonies, this book adds layers to his own writing and invites readers to venture beyond the page.

    Stone Offerings, by Mike Torrey
    Torrey’s admiration for Machu Picchu’s beauty and demanding nature, pour from the pages of this book. With a thoughtful history of the region, 120 photographs, and personal details that can only be learned by making the climb, armchair travelers will be inspired (perhaps simply to take an appreciative oxygen-rich breath, but still).

    Galapagos, by Tui De Roy
    Penguins, volcanos, iguanas, and more are all captured with De Roy’s compelling camera work, while her personal narration encourages urgent conservation. Like the island itself, this book never lacks for drama.

    The Summer Palace of the Romanovs, by Emmanuel Ducamp
    When you’re craving opulence, there’s nothing more glorious than living vicariously through the Romanovs. Step inside the Agate room, admire the gilded mirrors, hail the porcelain. Nothing is too fine for this palace, and Ducamp lavishes attention on every detail.

    The Most Scenic Drives in America, by Reader’s Digest Editors
    The American highways stretch from coast to coast, but it’s the backroads, winding detours, and secret exits that this book will guide you toward. With maps, seasonal advice, itineraries, and more, you’ll be ready to roll the windows down and take the long way home—or simply dream about it from the comfort of your chair!

    By the Sea, by Peter Guttman
    With the ocean as inspiration, Guttman travels to Maine’s granite coast, the floating markets of Southeast Asia, and even the North Pole. The result is a new understanding of the vital water that makes up more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface.

    Chic Stays, by Melinda Stevens
    Learn where celebrities like Kate Winslet prefer to stay as they introduce you to their favorite getaways. Hotels in Lisbon, Scotland, Sri Lanka, and more are featured here. Prepare to experience major room-service envy.

    What coffee table books would you recommend to armchair travelers?

    The post 50 Must-Have Coffee Table Books for the Armchair Traveler appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 3:00 pm on 2017/09/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , abandoned places, , , atlas obscura, beaches, , , , , , , castles from the air, , , , , , , , eric meole, ettore pettinaroli, gabriela logan, , , , , ireland: a luminous beauty, , james gracie, joel anderson, joshua foer, , , , , , , , , nonfiction, , , , paris in color, passage to israel, , , sebastiao salgado, secret journeys of a lifetime, , , spectacular scotland, , , , , , , , , the world’s great wonders, , , , , , ,   

    50 Must-Have Coffee Table Books for the Armchair Traveler 

    For those who know exactly what they would do if they won the lottery (buy a gorgeous house, quit working, and travel the world!), this collection of books is a passport to colorful daydreams, exotic foods, and amazing experiences that can only be found far from home. But if your day job is still your job job, take a virtual trip via one of these classic photography books. You’re sure to return, if not rested, at least inspired.

    Atlas Obscura, by Joshua Foer, Ella Morton, and Dylan Thuras
    From the creators of the popular website comes a book with profiles of 700 of the strangest (and most interesting!) places on Earth. Covering everything from a pub inside a baobob tree to a bone museum in Italy, each entry is sure to disgust, intrigue, amuse, delight, or amaze you.

    Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travel, by Lonely Planet
    So many places and so little time to see them…so let the experts at Lonely Planet rank them for you. Never worry about whether you should see Budapest before Birmingham again!

    1000 Places to See Before You Die, by Patricia Schultz
    If for some reason you’ve run out of places to see, consult the ultimate checklist and get back out there. This guide will inspire budget travelers, thrill seekers, and cultural anthropologists alike.

    Humans of New York: Stories, by Brandon Stanton
    Profound, real, and empathetic, Stanton has a talent for turning interviews into heart-to-heart sessions that reveal just how similar we all are, whether we spend our days in New York City, abroad, or in our armchairs.

    Paris in Bloom, by Georgianna Lane
    Take the most beautiful city in the world and add flowers? Ooh la la! This gorgeous collection of photographs celebrates the flower markets, gardens, and other floral focal points of the city. Très belle!

    Wild Beautiful Places, by National Geographic
    Step into the National Geographic archives with this collection of vintage photographs that capture Nature at her best. Including interviews with the photographers, this book will inspire you to improve your own skills.

    Beaches, by Gray Malin
    Photographed by a favorite in the fashion industry, The Hamptons, Capri, the Amalfi Coast, and more are all on display in these masterful aerial shots that show off the easy breezy glam that is life at the beach.

    Drives of a Lifetime, by National Geographic
    Whether you’re flying solo or with someone you love, there’s nothing better than a road trip. As much a collection of gorgeous photographs as it is a travel planner, this book will guide you onto the open road with expert advice, solid maps, and the detours dreams are made of.

    Both Sides of Sunset, by Jane Brown and Marla Hamburg Kennedy
    Photographs from masters like Julian Schulman and Lee Friedlander come together to reveal the many layers of Los Angeles, a city that can be as sinful as it is sunny. This book is the next best thing to landing at LAX.

    Secret Journeys of a Lifetime, by National Geographic
    Top Ten lists, large photographs, maps, and informative sidebars make this a practical guide to deeper travel. With chapters titled “Spiritual Havens,” “Hidden Treasures,” and “The Road Less Travelled,” you’ll step into a world that is missed by many but never forgotten by those who discover it.

    The National Parks, by Dayton Duncan and Ken Burns
    This is a behind-the-scenes look at the PBS special that celebrates Acadia, Denali, the Everglades and more national treasures, as well as a lavish visual history of the parks themselves. With the same democratic spirit as the TV series, this is a book for everyone.

    Paris in Color, by Nichole Robertson
    Bleu, rouge, vert, gris, noir! They’re all found in Paris. Take a colorful tour of artists’ favorite city. Organized by color, this book is sure to have you seeing even your own neighborhood with new eyes!

    Treasured Lands, by Q.T. Luong
    Having logged over 300 trips to the national parks, Luong is an expert on capturing their beauty and majesty. This collection of hundreds of photographs includes captions that explain his process and vision for protecting this magnificent land.

    This Land, by Jack Spencer
    Inspired by the attacks on September 11th, Spencer committed to creating a portrait of America. The project took him to churches, monuments, and the vast landscapes this country is known for. The resulting variety represents the diversity and wonder that is found here.

    Abandoned Places, by Kieron Connolly
    There’s something magnetic about images of ghost towns, rusty amusement parks, and abandoned hospitals. Both haunting and peaceful, they each tell a story, and Connolly’s more than 200 photographs are exceptional examples of the genre.

    Castles from the Air, by Giampiero Gianazza
    Often a favorite on any itinerary, castles represent our ability to create great things: community, architecture, and history. This book presents these ancient buildings with a fresh aerial perspective that will leave you eager to roam the real thing and admire their ingenuity and grace in person.

    Overview, by Benjamin Grant
    Using satellite images to make the astronaut perspective available to Earthbound armchair travelers, this collection of over 200 images reveals our planet in ways we’ve never seen before. Distant views of familiar buildings, landscapes, and more are sure to inspire you to see the world with new eyes, wherever you go.

    Bridges, by David Plowden
    Like a building or a monument, a bridge says something about the people who built it. This tour of American bridges celebrates the beauty, engineering, and spirit of collaboration they embody.

    12 Photographic Journeys: Iran in the 21st Century, by Anahita Ghabaian
    A variety of photographers come together to reveal the people of Iran, who live at the crossroads of traditional and modern life found in malls, cafes, mosques, and more. This is a thoughtful look at a beautiful country that is often misunderstood by outsiders.

    Passage to Israel, by Karen Lehrman
    Inspired by the land, light, and people of Israel, this book captures the deserts, cities, and spirit of this ancient place. Seen from the perspective of over 30 photographers, this collection will have you longing to see the country for yourself.

    London’s Waterfront, by Nicholas Waldemar Reed
    Some coffee-table books are sweeping in scope. Others reveal the intimate details of a hidden world. This book shines a light on a favorite section of London that’s so familiar, it’s easy to take it for granted. Instead learn the history of this area and study detailed drawings, so you’ll never pass by unaware again.

    Africa, by Sebastião Salgado
    With a photojournalist’s eye for truth, this collection of black-and-white photographs reveals the many people, places, animals, and truths that make up Africa. Text by African writer Mia Couto provides a perspective that foreigners must hear.

    The New Paris, by Lindsey Tramuta
    Of course, the traditions we know and love are alive and well in France. But Paris is also home to a vibrant, blossoming culture that welcomes new ideas, cultures, and people. Discover the new Paris with this warm collection of photographs and essays.

    The Japanese Garden, by Sophie Walker
    At over 300 pages, this book handles 800 years of Japanese gardening with the same deft elegance the masters bring to their gardens. Essays examine the meaning, technique, and care that is found in small and large landscapes that are expertly curated. Prepare to be inspired.

    Earth From Above, by Yann Arthus-Bertrand
    Created in partnership with UNESCO, this collection of aerial photographs is designed to evoke wonder and awe for our beautiful planet. And with over 200 images that present the Earth from a new, sometimes tender, other times grand, perspective, mission accomplished.

    The Hidden Himalayas, by Thomas L Kelly
    Travel where few Westerners have been before. The struggles, spirituality, and strength of the people of Humla are all on display in this evocative book that captures a hidden world that only the most intrepid travelers have seen.

    Spectacular Scotland, by James Gracie
    If you can tear yourself away from the Outlander series long enough to contemplate actually visiting Scotland, this book will have you longing to book a ticket straight away. The highlands, lochs, castles, glens, and villages are all captured here with Gracie’s sharp eye.

    New York, by Gabriela Kogan
    This is the New York that feels at once intimidating, inspiring, and utterly familiar all at once. It’s the New York you can only come to know by living in the city. And it’s here for admiring. Or not. New York doesn’t care. It’s just going to keep doing its thing, and Kogan will record it with her camera.

    59 Illustrated National Parks, by Nathan Anderson and Joel Anderson
    Designed in honor of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, this book includes keepsake posters, historic photographs, maps, tips on making the most of a visit to the parks, and a look at the history of these special places that belong to all of us.

    India, by Eric Meole
    India is an epic country, and at nearly 300 pages, this book honors the variety, magic, and history of the country. Meole took nearly 25,000 photographs (and curated them ruthlessly) to capture this place that has inspired people for thousands of years, including the writers who have contributed poems, essays, and more for this book.

    The World’s Great Wonders, by Lonely Planet
    If you’ve ever wondered “How did they do that?” Or “What could cause that?”, read on in this expansive yet informative book that reveals the how and why behind famous sites like the Grand Canyon, Stonehenge, and even the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Then impress your tour mates, or at least whoever you’re sharing the dinner table with.

    Ireland: A Luminous Beauty, by Peter Harbison and Leslie Conron Carola
    The stunning soft light of Ireland is at the center of this book. Everything from castle ruins to vast meadows appears nearly magical in this gorgeous glow. Prepare to sigh with pleasure.

    EarthArt, by Bernhard Edmaier
    Taking a cue from the color wheel, Edmaier has traveled around the world to capture the land from above in all its many hues. The natural beauty of Iceland, New Zealand, Chile, and more are proudly on full display, like a peacock unfolding his feathers.

    California the Beautiful, by Galen Rowell
    If you can’t afford a trip to the west coast, enjoy this road-trip-in-a-book that’s filled with sunsets, beaches, valleys, and that famous Sunshine State sparkle. Words by John Muir, Maya Angelou, Joan Didion and other luminaries add meaning to the experience.

    100 Places to Go Before They Disappear, by Co+Life
    If you don’t already feel excited to take a trip, perhaps a sense of urgency will push you to take action. Tragic but true, many of the world’s most beautiful and interesting places are sinking, being buried, or otherwise destroyed by human activity. Add the Great Barrier Reef, French vineyards, and of course, Venice to your list—quickly. The gorgeous photographs in this book will remind you why.

    Cairo Illustrated, by Michael Haag
    A unique mix of ancient and modern, sacred and commercial, gritty and beautiful, Cairo is a place that deserves a special spot, either abroad or on your bookshelf. This guide includes 150 dazzling photographs and informative introductions to mosques, markets, mosaics, and more.

    Steve McCurry: The Iconic Photographs, by Steve McCurry
    You may not know his name, but legendary photographer Steve McCurry’s images are unforgettable. Taken during his travels around the world, this collection reveals his unique vision of the human condition and what makes us, along with the world, so very beautiful.

    Great Houses of Havana, by Hermes Mallea
    With the travel ban lifted, it’s time to indulge in all things Cuba, including this gorgeous celebration of Havana architecture. Stately, colorful, and stylish, sugar plantations, mansions, and grand houses are on display here, as is a sophisticated look inside Cuba’s culture.

    My Nepenthe, by Romney Steele
    Even more compelling after the recent landslides in the area, this personal take on Big Sur and Nepenthe, the restaurant with the famous lookout, is one to savor. The recipes, family stories, and musings on what makes Big Sur so very special will transport you.

    Bhutan, by Matthieu Richard
    Richard has been invited into some of the world’s most isolated places. Here he reveals the color, courage, and creativity that are part of daily life in Bhutan, the land of the thunder dragon and national happiness.

    One Planet, by Lonely Planet
    You can almost hear Bob Marley singing “Let’s get together and feel alright,” as you flip through the pages of this book. It’s a beautiful gallery of images that makes a simple but important point: Wherever you go, we’re more similar than different.

    Spectacular China, by Nigel Cameron
    The best Chinese photographers have come together to show off their homeland with 180 colorful images, including many that unfold into panoramic posters. From ancient treasures to contemporary cities, you’ll never look at this country the same way again.

    Italy, by Ettore Pettinaroli
    Wander through the hills of Tuscany, the museums of Florence, and the canals of Venice in this stunning ode to Italy. With an insider’s knowledge, you can plan a Roman holiday or simply escape into the gorgeous vistas that Italy is beloved for.

    Tony Hillerman’s Landscape, by Anne Hillerman
    Author Tony Hillerman’s daughter has captured the New Mexico and Arizona deserts that play such a strong role in her father’s detective novels. With quotes from Tony, a history of the region, and insights into traditional Native American ceremonies, this book adds layers to his own writing and invites readers to venture beyond the page.

    Stone Offerings, by Mike Torrey
    Torrey’s admiration for Machu Picchu’s beauty and demanding nature, pour from the pages of this book. With a thoughtful history of the region, 120 photographs, and personal details that can only be learned by making the climb, armchair travelers will be inspired (perhaps simply to take an appreciative oxygen-rich breath, but still).

    Galapagos, by Tui De Roy
    Penguins, volcanos, iguanas, and more are all captured with De Roy’s compelling camera work, while her personal narration encourages urgent conservation. Like the island itself, this book never lacks for drama.

    The Summer Palace of the Romanovs, by Emmanuel Ducamp
    When you’re craving opulence, there’s nothing more glorious than living vicariously through the Romanovs. Step inside the Agate room, admire the gilded mirrors, hail the porcelain. Nothing is too fine for this palace, and Ducamp lavishes attention on every detail.

    The Most Scenic Drives in America, by Reader’s Digest Editors
    The American highways stretch from coast to coast, but it’s the backroads, winding detours, and secret exits that this book will guide you toward. With maps, seasonal advice, itineraries, and more, you’ll be ready to roll the windows down and take the long way home—or simply dream about it from the comfort of your chair!

    By the Sea, by Peter Guttman
    With the ocean as inspiration, Guttman travels to Maine’s granite coast, the floating markets of Southeast Asia, and even the North Pole. The result is a new understanding of the vital water that makes up more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface.

    Chic Stays, by Melinda Stevens
    Learn where celebrities like Kate Winslet prefer to stay as they introduce you to their favorite getaways. Hotels in Lisbon, Scotland, Sri Lanka, and more are featured here. Prepare to experience major room-service envy.

    What coffee table books would you recommend to armchair travelers?

    The post 50 Must-Have Coffee Table Books for the Armchair Traveler appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Saskia Lacey 3:15 pm on 2017/08/15 Permalink
    Tags: arts and crafts, , , hands on, nonfiction   

    5 Perfect Crafting Books for Etsy Fiends and Creative Kids 

    DIY divas unite! The following collection caters to the crafting inclined. Each book offers simple, step-by-step guides to everything from crepe paper bouquets and psychedelic soaps to lunchbox guitars and popsicle stick purses. Craft on!

    Paper to Petal, by Rebecca Thuss and Patrick Farrell
    Rebecca Thuss and Patrick Farrell are a husband and wife team whose work includes photography, design, and paper crafting. Many of their paper creations are whimsical, quite unlike flowers ordinarily found in nature: one can picture them blooming somewhere in Dorothy’s Oz or Alice’s Wonderland.

    Each flower found in the book has a different inspiration, from cupcake sprinkles to stained glass to flying kites. The book includes a colorful gallery of crepe paper creations, a detailed list of materials and skills needed to create each flower, and templates and tutorials for each of the 75 blooms.

    Soap Crafting, by Anne-Marie Faiola
    In this introduction to the science of soap-making, Faiola walks “soapers” through 31 recipes. A self-professed “soap queen,” she details different soap-making processes, necessary equipment, and the properties of ingredients including essential oils and fragrances. Some of her master creations include color block and stained glass soaps. As newbie soapers make their way through the book, recipes become progressively harder. This allows readers to successfully build on their new skills with each project!

    Martha Stewart’s Favorite Crafts for Kids, by the editors of Martha Stewart Living
    Charming, inventive, and easy to work from, this crafting book is a must have for every parent. Each activity is playful perfection: children will construct unique characters from felt, pipe cleaners, and even rocks! Children will stretch their imaginations creating hand-drawn stuffed animals, miniature worlds, pinecone elves, and more. Each of the 175 projects, from the seasonal to the timeless, includes a list of materials and step-by step guides.

    Maker Dad, by Mark Frauenfelder
    Authored by the editor in chief of Make magazine, this book is aimed toward a very specific audience: dads and their daughters in search of DIY projects to share. The result is a pretty dang adorable book, with projects including giant bubble wands, silkscreened T-shirts, rubber stamps made from scratch, and kite video cameras. Though geared towards dads and daughters, the book is sure to appeal to any parent and to craft-loving sons.

    The Craftster Guide to Nifty, Thrifty, and Kitschy Crafts, by Leah Kramer
    If retro crafts are your thing, Leah Kramer’s book will delight you. It includes fifty projects, forty of which are taken from vintage craft books. Teach your little one to make the same crafts their grandparents may have learned as a child, including Popsicle stick purses, trashcan lamps, egg carton lanterns, and plastic bottle piggy banks. And Kramer’s got cred: she’s the founder of Craftster.com, a crafting community started in 2003.

    The post 5 Perfect Crafting Books for Etsy Fiends and Creative Kids appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 9:00 pm on 2017/05/10 Permalink
    Tags: , build your bookshelf, love and marriage, , , nonfiction,   

    21 Books for the Newlywed’s Bookshelf 

    Here comes the bride, all dressed in white—what books will she read with her new spouse? Okay, maybe the song doesn’t go quite like that, but that doesn’t mean newlyweds can’t add a few books to their registry. If you want to give your newlyweds a gift that’s a little more life-changing than a crystal punch bowl, a book is a welcome way to pass on some wisdom to wide-eyed lovers. And if you’re feeling a little nervous about your own wedding, these books are perfect for building confidence and excitement about all the happiness that lies ahead.

    The Newlywed’s Instruction Manual, by Caroline Tiger
    Are we arguing too much? Where is that wagon wheel coffee table going? What are we going to do about the in-laws? It’s common to have a lot of questions in the first year of marriage. This illustrated instruction manual is filled with answers and—yes!—diagrams. Think of it as your own personal troubleshooting guide to matrimony. Need some urgent advice? Jump to the chapter on trust and communication!

    Becoming Wise, by Krista Tippett
    This book from the host of On Being asks what it means to be human and who we are when we’re our best selves. And if we are ever to be successful, we must bring our best selves to marriage! This is required reading for husbands, wives, and anyone who wants to live their lives with curiosity, joy, and deep authenticity.

    The Four Agreements, by Don Miguel Ruiz
    As tempting as it may be to enter marriage with a plan to improve your better half, it’s probably wiser to start by changing yourself. This classic book urges readers to make four essential agreements with themselves: Be impeccable with your word. Don’t take anything personally. Don’t make assumptions. Always do your best. This is definitely the recipe to a happy marriage, or even a well-lived life.

    The Gifts of Imperfection, by Brené Brown
    Sharing a vocabulary of pet names, inside jokes, and quirky life theories is one of the pleasures of being in a long-term relationship. Take this idea to the next level by sharing the language of Brené Brown, who wisely counsels readers to live a more compassionate, intentional, wholehearted life. Read this with your new husband or wife, and you’re sure to refer back to it in arguments and makeups.

    Help, Thanks, Wow, by Anne Lamott
    There’s something about knowing you’ll be sharing a dinner table with someone for the rest of your life that makes you feel a little more spiritual and inclined to pray for your loved ones. The ever-essential Anne Lamott addresses three types of prayers: asking for helping, giving thanks, and the feeling of awe we may find ourselves longing for at the end of the day, even if we don’t know the traditional verses. Use this book to elevate your meals and lift your spirits.

    The Secrets of Happy Families, by Bruce Feiler
    One of the consequences of being married is appreciating how blissfully efficient things were when you were single. Of course, you would never trade to get those days back, but if you’re looking for strategies that will help you and your spouse align your goals on everything from what to have for dinner to how to raise your kids, this book is filled with business, sports, and military techniques, along with scientifically supported advice that will make your family run smoothly and feel authentic to who you are as a couple.

    The Five Love Languages, by Gary Chapman
    With over 11 million copies sold, they might start handing out this book with marriage certificates. If you haven’t received your copy yet, seek it out. This simple book is based on the powerful idea that we can learn to show our loved ones that we love them in ways that will actually make them feel loved, not just in the ways we think or hope will make them feel loved. Being able to articulate what makes you feel loved and knowing how to show your beloved how much you treasure them? That’s pretty much the key to wedded bliss.

    Marriage and Other Acts of Charity, by Kate Braestrup
    As a minister, a widow, and a wife, Kate Braestrup brings an honest voice to the ups and downs of the ties that bind us together. With advice on how to mend a relationship after a fight, what it really means to share your life with someone, and how we can honor our commitment “for better or for worse,” this is a book you’ll want to read aloud to each other.

    The Automatic Millionaire, by David Bach
    Marriage is more than a commitment of the heart, it’s a financial partnership. As you spend long hours daydreaming about what you’ll name your kids and how you want to stay in love as you travel the world, take time to also talk about what retirement will look like for your family. This book is sure to have you dreaming big and feeling more confident about your plans for the future.

    The Princess Bride, by William Goldman
    This classic story has something for everyone, including romantics, adventure seekers, and nostalgic adults, which means it’s perfect to read with your honey after a long day at the office. Escape into this fantasy, then role play with Westley’s classic “As you wish,” line. You know what they say: The couple that quests together, stays together.

    The Nest Newlywed Handbook, by Carley Roney 
    When you want practical, no-nonsense advice on modern married life, but don’t want to prompt mockery or worried looks from your in-laws and friends, turn to the Nest, a trusted source for millions. With the straightforward tone of an owner’s manual, this book will help you figure out how to merge finances, fight nicely, and navigate the emotional knot that is the holidays. Everything you need to create a marriage that works for you is covered!

    The Happiness Project One-Sentence Journal, by Crown Publishing Group
    Marriage guru Dr. Gottman says if a couple has five positive interactions for every negative interaction, their relationship is healthy, but we all know how easy it can be to focus on that one little annoyance. This journal, inspired by happiness expert Gretchen Rubin, provides a daily prompt to accentuate the positive and remember the moments that made you smile. It’s the kind of scorekeeping that will help you look back on your first five years of marriage with affection. Bonus points if you keep the journal together!

    Love Coupons, by Gregory J.P. Godek
    It’s natural for fledglings to make mistakes, and keeping the lines of communication open and affectionate will go a long way toward making that okay. But sometimes you can’t bring yourself to apologize, or you’re not quite ready to kiss and make up. Having a book of love coupons on hand is the perfect (silent) way to start the I’m Sorry process. And bonus points if you leave a coupon in a lunch bag or briefcase for no good reason. With prompts for cuddling, slipping away for a weekend, and making a home-cooked meal, these coupons are sure to lead to lovely memories.

    One Dish, Two Ways, by Jane Kennedy
    One of the trickiest parts of living with someone is trying to coordinate meals. And when two picky eaters marry each other? Bless them! That’s asking for heartache. But this handy book offers loads of solutions and encourages couples to lay down the knives. It’s filled with recipes for grownups, kids, and grownups who are as picky as kids (no judgments here). Each dish starts with a base meal that can be added to and deconstructed to meet everyone’s tastes, allergies, and food restrictions. Basically it’s a culinary way of saying, “I like you just very much, just as you are.”

    All About Us, by Phillip Keel
    While you’re still in the gooey-eyed honeymoon phase of your relationship, why not spend nights by the fireplace answering the questions in this book. Simple yet meaningful and thought-provoking, these questions are designed to help couples get to know each other better and celebrate their love. What better way to spend a Sunday night than journaling together?

    The Art of Communicating, by Thich Nhat Hanh
    If there’s one secret to marriage, it’s communication. Any happy couple will tell you that, and they’re right. So why not learn the art of communication from a true zen master? This practical guide offers clear steps you can take to listen mindfully and express what you’re really feeling, whether you’re angry about socks in the living room or insecure about a late night at the office.

    Love Poems, by Pablo Neruda
    There will be moments when you look at your better half and feel like your heart is bursting with love. When words fail to describe how very important this person is to you, turn to the masters. Pablo Neruda’s sensual love poems still feel modern and romantic today. And if words of affection is your betrothed’s love language, you will definitely want to have this book on hand.

    How We Love, by Milan Yerkovich
    Before we can vow to love each other completely, we need to understand how we love (and hurt) each other. Use this book to explore attachment theory and your own “intimacy blueprint,” so you can develop a marriage that will last. Understand how your personal history influences your mate, discover how to unlock painful patterns, and find a way forward that works for both of you. This book will give you the tools you need to divorce-proof your love affair.

    The Newlywed Cookbook, by Sarah Copeland
    When a cookbook guides you through the process, sharing a homemade meal with your family can feel splendidly grownup. Cooking can also be a lovely way to spend quality time together. Set yourself up for success (and minimize the spilled milk) with over 130 recipes, including decadent pancakes and pastas, that are expertly chosen to encourage domestic bliss. Soon you’ll be dancing through farmer’s markets and nuzzling in the kitchen together.

    Strengths Based Marriage, by Jimmy Evans
    Based on the same concept as the popular StrengthsFinder book, which encourages readers to spend more time leaning into what makes you amazing and less time worrying about improving areas of weakness, this guide provides helpful tips and a reassuring boost to any marriage. As with any tool that cultivates self-awareness, you’ll come away with a deeper understanding of how your relationship works and how to make it as rich as possible. The authors also walk you through the 5 Ts of marriage. (That’s tone, time, trust, truth, and teamwork for newlyweds.)

    Letters to My Love, by Chronicle Books
    Imagine celebrating your golden anniversary, not just with a party or a dinner with your sweetheart, but by reading letters you wrote to each other as newlyweds. Capture the excitement and passion of this moment with this beautiful keepsake. Twelve prompts encourage you to reveal your heart in love letters you’ll treasure forever. Write one every year on your anniversary, or just whenever the mood strikes, then tuck them away for safekeeping, and swoon when, years later, you open each envelope—together.

     
  • Jeff Somers 5:30 pm on 2017/04/21 Permalink
    Tags: al gore, an inconvenient sequel, botanicum, nonfiction, , the world without fish, think green   

    7 Books to Celebrate Earth Day 

    For nearly 50 years, people all over the world have celebrated Earth Day every April 22, coming together in support of environmental protection. It’s an opportunity to reflect on how we’re doing as stewards of this planet, to educate ourselves about the value of sound environmental policies, and to learn appreciate the beauty of nature. Here’s a starter list of seven books you can read—or read to others—in order to get into the spirit of the day.

    Climate of Hope: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet, by Michael Bloomberg and Carl Pope
    Michael Bloomberg is one of those billionaires who has tried to leverage his wealth to accomplish something of meaning, and he brings his specific expertise—gained as mayor of New York City—to a book focused on how cities and other local authorities can pursue environmentally sane policies. Joining Bloomberg is former Chairman of the Sierra Club Carl Pope. The book is perfectly timed for a moment in American politics when federal budgets are on the chopping block, leaving cities and states to fend for themselves on a wide range of issues. This is a practical book with big small-scale ideas, filled with surprising information, such as the role that large buildings play in climate change (they are responsible for 70% of the greenhouse gases generated in cities). If you’re looking to arm yourself with real data for Earth Day, this is the perfect pick up.

    An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, by Al Gore
    More than a decade ago, former Vice President Al Gore became the public face of climate change with the release of An Inconvenient Truth. In many ways, that film raised the profile of our troubled environment and changed the conversation about climate change and our role in combating it—and yet in so many ways, nothing seems to have actually changed. On Earth Day, in 2017, we argue about the causes of what’s happening to our planet, and Gore’s new book offers data and eye-witness experience that should be compelling to anyone willing to explore the issue. An Inconvenient Sequel builds the case that human beings are the main cause of climate change, then offers concrete steps we can still take to change the future course of our shared history. Fuel up your debate machine with information straight from one of the foremost experts on the subject, then wade into the battle for the planet on April 22—and every day after, too.

    Utterly Amazing Earth, by Dorling Kindersley
    Appreciating our planet and the climate that allows life to exist begins with understanding it. This entry in the Utterly Amazing series is a perfect introduction for curious young minds. Offering an inside-out overview of the planet’s various components and cycles, its brilliant design includes plenty of interactive aspects—pop-ups, wheels, and pull-tabs engage kids and bring the information to vibrant life. The writing is simple but not simplistic, and a focus on visuals over dry recitation of data makes it the sort of science book kids will enjoy reading and playing with, encouraging young environmental warriors to take that curiosity and hands-on approach with them throughout their life’s journey, to the planet’s benefit.

    World Without Fish, by Mark Kurlansky and Frank Stockton
    Discussions about climate change sometimes focus too much on pollution and technology, and Kurlansky’s urgent book is the antidote. In high-energy prose and illustrations by Stockton, the book shines a spotlight on the issue of overfishing and the dire consequences it could have for the world. The author argues current policies could result in the loss of several species of fish within decades, which in turn could cause a total collapse of the carefully-balanced biosphere in our oceans. A comic demonstrates how this could play out; the result is slimy, dead oceans and global disaster. Visually arresting, energetic, and filled with alarming information, it’s a book no kid will read without becoming something of an activist—just in time for Earth Day.

    Where Does the Garbage Go?, by Paul Showers and Randy Chewning
    Many of us fail to think about what happens to the stuff we throw away—for many, garbage just magically disappears overnight, never to trouble us again. For kids, this book represents an ideal way to introduce environmental concepts with an interesting exploration of where our garbage goes, and what happens to it. Linking what we throw away with the direct consequences in terms of recycling, landfill, and energy use gently teaches children the relationship between our lifestyle, our actions, and the state of the environment. The book perfectly balances complexity with fun, making saving the Earth seem like a grand adventure.

    Botanicum, by Kathy Willis and Katie Scott
    Humans don’t exist in a vacuum. We live in a sometimes contentious partnership with other animals—and plants. This visually stunning book offers a deep dive into the secret world of plant life, combining incredibly detailed illustrations with incisive commentary, the end result being a world-class introduction to the science of botany. Detailed cutaways demonstrate how various plants work, and the broad scope of the work (beginning with “first plants”) is awe-inspiring enough to encourage any budding botanist to consider making plants part of their lives going forward. Instilling respect for our environment begins with understanding it, and Botanicum is a fun, beautiful way for kids to begin that process.

    The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss
    No Earth Day feels complete without a visit to Dr. Seuss’ classic cautionary tale of environmental mismanagement. The greedy Once-ler discovers the Truffula trees and enthusiastically cuts them down in order to fuel his factory, ignoring the pleas of the Lorax, who speaks for the trees and the animals who depend on the beautiful, balanced environment they anchor. It isn’t until years after he has logged the last tree and totally destroyed the area—until years after the Lorax itself has left, leaving behind the mysterious monument that reads simply “UNLESS”—that the Once-ler sees the error of his ways, giving the last Truffula seed to a young boy and charging him with recreating what was lost. The Lorax is a powerfully sad lesson that resonates with kids and adults alike, inspiring a more thoughtful approach to our environment.

    The post 7 Books to Celebrate Earth Day appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel