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  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2018/05/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , new releases   

    May’s Best New Fiction 

    Beach Read Queens, assemble! May brings us fresh fare from Dorothea Benton Frank, Mary Kay Andrews, and Mary Alice Monroe, aka your go-to authors for sand, surf, love, and family drama. Danielle Steel’s newest depicts a work-based family behind the scenes at a TV show, Michael Ondaatje offers up a coming-of-age mystery, and Christopher Buckley provides unexpected laughs from 1664.

    Love and Ruin, by Paula McLain
    After depicting the life of Hadley Richardson in her bestselling The Paris Wife, McLain sets her sights on Hemingway’s third wife, acclaimed war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. Her connection to Hemingway begins in Key West, Florida, in the late 1930s and ramps up against the invigorating, terrible backdrop of the Spanish Civil War. Two stars are on the rise—journalist and novelist, equal in skill—but one must eclipse the other. 

    By Invitation Only, by Dorothea Benton Frank
    Wedding season is upon us, and who better to enjoy it with than Dorothea Benton Frank, the queen of Lowcountry beach reads? Meet the Stiftels, peach farmers in South Carolina. They’re in for some serious culture shock when their beloved only son, Fred, becomes engaged to Shelby Cambria, the wealthy daughter of a Chicago-based private equity master of the universe.  When the two families are thrown together, first in Lowcountry and then in the Windy City, their disparate backgrounds clash, and multiple secrets come tumbling out.

    The High Tide Club, by Mary Kay Andrews
    New York Times bestseller Andrews delivers a tale of Southern romance and suspense that kicks off when Josephine, an eccentric, almost century-old heiress living in a Grey Gardens-esque crumbling mansion by the sea, hires lawyer Brooke to complete a mysterious task. Brooke must gather together the descendants of Josephine’s best friends for a reunion that may prove either profitable or deadly.

    The Cast, by Danielle Steel
    Kate Whittier, a twice-divorced magazine columnist with a robust fan base, powers through her fears of intimacy after she finds the support she needs to create a TV show based on the life of her extraordinary grandmother. And when Kait’s own life implodes unexpectedly, it’s the tightknit cast of the show she turns to for the strength to carry on.

    Beach House Reunion, by Mary Alice Monroe
    In the fifth book of her popular, heartwarming Beach House series, which concerns several generations of the Rutledge family living in Lowcountry, we meet Cara’s niece Linnea, a recent college grad who feels uncertain about her future and burdened by her parents’ expectations. Perhaps a summer at the Isle of Palms, rife with dolphins and loggerhead sea turtles, is in order? At Primrose Cottage, she and Cara help one another put the past to rights. Although it can be read as a standalone, series readers will be delighted by the cameos from previous characters.

    The Judge Hunter, by Christopher Buckley
    In this comedic, historical mystery-thriller (how often do you see that genre?), expert satirist Buckley (Thank You For Smoking) scatters real-life figures amid his own creations. A young, utterly useless layabout, Balty St. Michael, sets off for the New World in 1664, commissioned by his cousin Samuel Pepys to locate two judges who disappeared after assisting in the murder of Charles I. Helping Balty is a competent former commander with motives of his own. Adventure and hijinks ensue on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as throughout the newborn colonies.

    Warlight, by Michael Ondaatje
    From the author of The English Patient and The Cat’s Table comes a bildungsroman set in London in the immediate aftermath of World War II, as well as fourteen years later, when protagonist Nathaniel attempts to make sense of his mother’s enigmatic and disturbing behavior. Immediately following the war’s conclusion, teenage Nathan and his sister Rachel were left behind for a year with two mysterious, possibly criminal guardians while their parents traveled to Singapore. (Or did they?) In the decades to come, now working for British intelligence services, Nathan tries to piece together his mother’s secrets. The buildup to the answers he’ll find promises to be exquisitely poetic.

    The High Season, by Judy Blundell
    In her first book for adults (she previously won the National Book Award for her YA noir, What I Saw and How I Lied), Blundell proves once again how skilled she is at peeling back the glossy exteriors of people’s lives. Middle-aged, divorced Ruthie and her fifteen-year-old daughter are forced to abandon their beach house each summer and rent it out in order to afford living there the rest of the year. To their consternation, and despite their location in North Fork, they’re not safe from the wealthy, greedy Hamptons crowd two ferry stops away; in fact, their latest boarder exemplifies that group and seems poised to scoop up and replace Ruthie herself, starting with staking a claim on Ruthie’s ex-husband.

    Adjustment Day, by Chuck Palahniuk
    This dystopian-horror satire flows straight out of 2018 America. Day blends revolution, dirty politics, the worst of the internet, widespread murder (journalists and elites from a publicly voted on list are targeted), and a “Declaration of Interdependence” that results in the country being carved up into sections with names like Blacktopia, Gaysia, and (medieval) Caucasia. Heaven help you if you don’t fit the theme within your new borders: better adjust or flee. Fight Club aficionados will love the allusions to Project Mayhem.

    A Shout in the Ruins, by Kevin Powers
    Moving back and forth in time from the Civil War to the recent past, Shout examines the effects of slavery, segregation, and endemic violence on people from all sides of it. In the 1950s, seventysomething George Seldom decides to retrace the steps of his life, uncovering the threads that bind him to the inhabitants of the Beauvais Plantation in Richmond, Virginia. He’s joined by a young waitress whose own story (and contemplation of the past) take center stage in the 1980s. A Virginia native, Powers is an army veteran whose debut, The Yellow Birds, won the PEN/Hemingway Award.

    The post May’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2018/05/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , new releases   

    May’s Best New Fiction 

    Beach Read Queens, assemble! May brings us fresh fare from Dorothea Benton Frank, Mary Kay Andrews, and Mary Alice Monroe, aka your go-to authors for sand, surf, love, and family drama. Danielle Steel’s newest depicts a work-based family behind the scenes at a TV show, Michael Ondaatje offers up a coming-of-age mystery, and Christopher Buckley provides unexpected laughs from 1664.

    Love and Ruin, by Paula McLain
    After depicting the life of Hadley Richardson in her bestselling The Paris Wife, McLain sets her sights on Hemingway’s third wife, acclaimed war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. Her connection to Hemingway begins in Key West, Florida, in the late 1930s and ramps up against the invigorating, terrible backdrop of the Spanish Civil War. Two stars are on the rise—journalist and novelist, equal in skill—but one must eclipse the other. 

    By Invitation Only, by Dorothea Benton Frank
    Wedding season is upon us, and who better to enjoy it with than Dorothea Benton Frank, the queen of Lowcountry beach reads? Meet the Stiftels, peach farmers in South Carolina. They’re in for some serious culture shock when their beloved only son, Fred, becomes engaged to Shelby Cambria, the wealthy daughter of a Chicago-based private equity master of the universe.  When the two families are thrown together, first in Lowcountry and then in the Windy City, their disparate backgrounds clash, and multiple secrets come tumbling out.

    The High Tide Club, by Mary Kay Andrews
    New York Times bestseller Andrews delivers a tale of Southern romance and suspense that kicks off when Josephine, an eccentric, almost century-old heiress living in a Grey Gardens-esque crumbling mansion by the sea, hires lawyer Brooke to complete a mysterious task. Brooke must gather together the descendants of Josephine’s best friends for a reunion that may prove either profitable or deadly.

    The Cast, by Danielle Steel
    Kate Whittier, a twice-divorced magazine columnist with a robust fan base, powers through her fears of intimacy after she finds the support she needs to create a TV show based on the life of her extraordinary grandmother. And when Kait’s own life implodes unexpectedly, it’s the tightknit cast of the show she turns to for the strength to carry on.

    Beach House Reunion, by Mary Alice Monroe
    In the fifth book of her popular, heartwarming Beach House series, which concerns several generations of the Rutledge family living in Lowcountry, we meet Cara’s niece Linnea, a recent college grad who feels uncertain about her future and burdened by her parents’ expectations. Perhaps a summer at the Isle of Palms, rife with dolphins and loggerhead sea turtles, is in order? At Primrose Cottage, she and Cara help one another put the past to rights. Although it can be read as a standalone, series readers will be delighted by the cameos from previous characters.

    The Judge Hunter, by Christopher Buckley
    In this comedic, historical mystery-thriller (how often do you see that genre?), expert satirist Buckley (Thank You For Smoking) scatters real-life figures amid his own creations. A young, utterly useless layabout, Balty St. Michael, sets off for the New World in 1664, commissioned by his cousin Samuel Pepys to locate two judges who disappeared after assisting in the murder of Charles I. Helping Balty is a competent former commander with motives of his own. Adventure and hijinks ensue on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as throughout the newborn colonies.

    Warlight, by Michael Ondaatje
    From the author of The English Patient and The Cat’s Table comes a bildungsroman set in London in the immediate aftermath of World War II, as well as fourteen years later, when protagonist Nathaniel attempts to make sense of his mother’s enigmatic and disturbing behavior. Immediately following the war’s conclusion, teenage Nathan and his sister Rachel were left behind for a year with two mysterious, possibly criminal guardians while their parents traveled to Singapore. (Or did they?) In the decades to come, now working for British intelligence services, Nathan tries to piece together his mother’s secrets. The buildup to the answers he’ll find promises to be exquisitely poetic.

    The High Season, by Judy Blundell
    In her first book for adults (she previously won the National Book Award for her YA noir, What I Saw and How I Lied), Blundell proves once again how skilled she is at peeling back the glossy exteriors of people’s lives. Middle-aged, divorced Ruthie and her fifteen-year-old daughter are forced to abandon their beach house each summer and rent it out in order to afford living there the rest of the year. To their consternation, and despite their location in North Fork, they’re not safe from the wealthy, greedy Hamptons crowd two ferry stops away; in fact, their latest boarder exemplifies that group and seems poised to scoop up and replace Ruthie herself, starting with staking a claim on Ruthie’s ex-husband.

    Adjustment Day, by Chuck Palahniuk
    This dystopian-horror satire flows straight out of 2018 America. Day blends revolution, dirty politics, the worst of the internet, widespread murder (journalists and elites from a publicly voted on list are targeted), and a “Declaration of Interdependence” that results in the country being carved up into sections with names like Blacktopia, Gaysia, and (medieval) Caucasia. Heaven help you if you don’t fit the theme within your new borders: better adjust or flee. Fight Club aficionados will love the allusions to Project Mayhem.

    A Shout in the Ruins, by Kevin Powers
    Moving back and forth in time from the Civil War to the recent past, Shout examines the effects of slavery, segregation, and endemic violence on people from all sides of it. In the 1950s, seventysomething George Seldom decides to retrace the steps of his life, uncovering the threads that bind him to the inhabitants of the Beauvais Plantation in Richmond, Virginia. He’s joined by a young waitress whose own story (and contemplation of the past) take center stage in the 1980s. A Virginia native, Powers is an army veteran whose debut, The Yellow Birds, won the PEN/Hemingway Award.

    The post May’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 1:30 pm on 2018/04/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , new releases   

    April’s Best New Fiction 

    This month’s best fiction brings us new works from powerhouse writers including Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Julian Barnes, and Christopher Moore. It’s a literary feast of nostalgic love stories, satirical noir, lighthearted mysteries, and historical fiction, with Curtis Sittenfeld’s (PrepAmerican Wife) delectable collection of short stories providing the appetizers.

    Circe, by Madeline Miller
    Miller’s much buzzed-about followup to 2011’s The Song of Achilles is narrated by the dazzling, captivating, vengeful Circe, daughter of Helios, who is banished by Zeus after turning her ex’s new love into a sea monster. Dismissed as useless when she was a girl (when your dad is the sun god, there’s a lot to live up to), Circe’s true skills are her penchant for herbs and spellcasting. Circe’s infatuation with mortals is her biggest strength and greatest weakness, and you’ll breathlessly follow her witchy, thousands-of-years-in-the-making adventures.

    The Female Persuasion, by Meg Wolitzer
    Wolitzer’s fascinating, timely new book combines elements of her previous bestsellers The Interestings (with its theme of youthful expectation versus the realities of middle age) and The Wife (a dark tale of subverted female ambition). The central relationship of Persuasion is that of Greer Kadetsky, a young, shy, liberal arts–educated woman and her mentor, Faith Frank, a 60-something pioneering member of the feminist movement. Greer’s childhood sweetheart and best friend have their own compelling narratives as well. The quartet of fully realized characters will pull you in to their lives even as their respective connections with each other are potentially torn asunder.

    Varina, by Charlies Frazier
    As with his stunning, National Book Award–winning Cold Mountain (also a film starring Nicole Kidman and Jude Law), Varina is set during the Civil War. The novel is narrated as an oral memoir by the titular heroine, Jefferson Davis’s much-younger wife, whose views of the conflict did not necessarily match those of the Confederate President. Little has been written about the First Lady of the Confederacy, and the story depicted here is full of rich and often unexpected details about the antebellum south as well as Varina’s post–Civil War life in New York.

    Nantucket Wedding, by Nancy Thayer
    Widowed Alison didn’t expect to remarry, especially now that she’s a grandmother to toddlers, but when she meets David, sparks fly, and the two soon find themselves engaged. How will their adult children handle the news? Will the four new siblings find common ground with each other, or become common enemies? Most importantly, will the Nantucket wedding itself go off without a hitch or fall apart before the newly blended family has a chance to bond? Fun and fast-paced with plenty of location envy to make you drool, Wedding promises to be a perfect spring break/early summer read.

    You Think It, I’ll Say It: Stories, by Curtis Sittenfeld
    In her first collection of short stories, bestselling novelist Sittenfeld’s talent for lifting the curtain on the apparent successes of others is on full display. Protagonists irritated by social media perfection and chipper volunteers (not to mention the politics of the day) are fully relatable and lovable in their snarkiness. If you enjoyed “The Prairie Wife” (first published in the New Yorker last year), in which a wife and mother considers upending the perfect social media empire of a former love, you’ll adore the nine additional stories waiting for you here.

    Noir, by Christopher Moore
    Part satire and part homage to Raymond Chandler– and Dashiell Hammett–style gumshoe fiction, Moore’s novel sends his readers to the hardboiled, foggy mean streets of 1940s San Francisco, where bartender Sammy Tiffin falls fast for a dame whose disappearance seems to involve all manner of conspiracy. Whether he’s being interrogated or chased, Sammy keeps the wisecracks flowing. And then there’s the mysterious, possibly extraterrestrial Roswell connection…

    The Only Story, by Julian Barnes
    Nineteen-year-old Paul falls in love with forty-eight-year-old Susan at a tennis club outside London in 1963. Despite (or perhaps because of) societal and parental censure, they move in together and embark on an eventually public affair. Five decades later, older but not necessarily wiser, Paul looks back on their exhilarating and painful story, parsing it for meaning and pushing on the bruise of the “the only story” of his life he has deemed worth telling. This looks to be a heartbreaking, transformative read from the acclaimed author of The Sense of an Ending, for which he won the Man Booker Prize.

    First Person, by Richard Flanagan
    Kif, a young writer frantic for cash to support his family, accepts an assignment that will test his writing chops and his sanity. If he succeeds in finishing the criminal memoir of Siegfried Heidl in six agonizing weeks, only then will he see a payday. But Heidl, an embezzler who’s been convicted of stealing $700 million from the Australian banking industry, doesn’t wish to be known, so he refuses to provide pertinent information to his ghost writer. Instead, Heidl has a penchant for turning the spotlight around and infiltrating Kif’s life. Readers are in excellent meta-fictional hands: Flanagan won the Man Booker for The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

    Paris by the Book, by Liam Callanan
    When her troubled husband Robert, who writes book for young people, disappears, left-behind Leah becomes the protagonist of her own mystery (and perhaps a romance). With her two daughters beside her, Leah follows the clues Robert left in his wake, which include plane tickets to Paris and a half-written manuscript. The manuscript, in turn, leads them to a bookshop in dire need of new owners. But will Leah’s unexpected, charmed new life in France fill the spaces where Robert used to be?

    Miss Julia Raises the Roof, by Ann B. Ross
    In Miss Julia’s nineteenth adventure, a light mystery set in small-town North Carolina, the outspoken, warm-hearted heroine is in top form as she seeks to uncover the truth about a planned group home for teenage boys, to be situated next door to her friend Hazel’s place. In theory, the project sounds good, but Julia’s hunch that something is seriously amiss proves well-founded. (“They Lord!” indeed.)

    The post April’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 3:00 pm on 2018/03/21 Permalink
    Tags: , , , new releases,   

    The First Barnes & Noble Book Club Selection Read It Now and Join Us in Stores on May 2 

    People think of reading as a solitary activity—curling up with a book in a lonesome spot, a cup of tea nearby, a cat or two napping in your lap. But one of the great joys of reading books is talking about them: getting insights, arguing over characters and plot twists, swapping recommendations for another half-dozen you just have to read. Despite our tendency to get lost in a good book, readers are a deceptively chatty and social bunch.

    We have long been proud to serve as unofficial host to readers’ book clubs around the country. And now, to celebrate our readers and the power of shared book love, we’re announcing the launch of the Barnes & Noble Book Club.

    The first meeting will be held on May 2, 6–7 p.m., with local discussions hosted at all 630 stores in 50 states and led by our expert booksellers. The book club is free to all, and participants will be treated to a free tall, hot or iced coffee and cookie from the café. The first selection is in a special Barnes & Noble Book Club edition, which includes a Reading Group Guide and an essay by the author. One signed copy of the book will be given away at the book club.

    Our first B&N Book Club pick? The Female Persuasion, by Meg Wolitzer. The author of books including The Wife and The Interestings, Wolitzer packs her books with provocative ideas and unique views of the world. The Female Persuasion centers on idealistic but painfully shy college freshman Greer Kadetsky, who, after attending a lecture by feminist icon Faith Frank, is both electrified and intimidated by Frank’s intelligence, ferocity, and commitment to the cause. After graduation, Greer is thrilled to land a job with Frank’s foundation—but when her new life begins to crumble around her, Greer finds herself reevaluating her entire worldview, including her understanding of Frank and of what it means to be a feminist in the modern age.

    In other words, this is the sort of book you can talk about for days. Like all the best book club picks, it’s both a must-read and a “must talk about over coffee and cookies.”

    You can preorder your B&N Book Club Edition of The Female Persuasion in advance of its April 3 release, and sign up for the club at your local B&N. (If your local happens to be our location on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, get ready for author Wolitzer herself to join in the conversation!)

    We’ll be hosting book club meetings four times a year, so watch out for details on our next pick. And don’t forget to join us May 2 for an exciting evening of book nerdery, new friends, and Wolitzer’s fantastic new novel.

    The post The First Barnes & Noble Book Club Selection Read It Now and Join Us in Stores on May 2 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2018/02/28 Permalink
    Tags: , alternate side, , auntie poldi and the sicilian lions, christina lynch, , , i'll be your blue sky, italian teacher, , john brownjohn, kristin harmel, leah stewart, mario giordano, marisa de los santos, new releases, not that i could tell, speak no evil, the italian party, the room on rue amelie, , uzodinma iweala, what you don't know about charlie outlaw   

    The Best New Fiction of March 2018 

    This month brings us several poignant family dramas and plenty of neighborhood intrigue, from a wealthy New York City enclave to a scandal-plagued Ohioan suburb. A heart-pounding thriller aboard an airplane; a TV star’s abduction; and three books set in Italy will have you staying up late turning pages and practicing your grazies and pregos! Lastly, a long-awaited second novel from Beasts of No Nation author Uzodinma Iweala promises to leave you gasping.

    Accidental Heroes, by Danielle Steel
    This thriller set in the not-so-friendly skies finds a Homeland Security agent racing against the clock to prevent tragedy aboard a flight from New York to San Francisco. Assisting him in his tense mission are a group of “everyday people” whose fates have converged. Some of them work for the airport or the airline, and some of them are strangers thrown together from across the country. None of them expected to be heroes. Now boarding: A character study wrapped around an action-packed drama.

    Alternate Side, by Anna Quindlen
    A bestselling novelist (Miller’s ValleyObject Lessons) and advice-giver (A Short Guide to a Happy LifeBeing Perfect), Quindlen centers her latest novel on an elite neighborhood in Manhattan. Nora and Charlie Nolan, and the rest of their secluded, close-knit community, are thrown into chaos when an act of violence with racial undertones forces them to take stock of who and what they really are.

    The Italian Teacher, by Tom Rachman
    As with his first, critically lauded book The Imperfectionists, Rachman’s latest takes place in Rome, this time in the 1950s art world. Charles “Pinch” Bavinsky is one of seventeen kids produced by a philandering, impossible-to-pin-down father, Bear Bavinsky, who also happens to be a genius painter. At first, Pinch yearns to follow in his father’s footsteps, or at least become his biographer. Will Pinch’s job as a language instructor in London bring him the fulfillment he hopes for, or will his complicated relationship with his father be the only legacy available to him?

    Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions, by Mario Giordano (translated by John Brownjohn)
    Determined to spend her twilight years drinking wine and enjoying the beauty of Sicily, 60-year-old Auntie Poldi, a former costume designer with a wide variety of wigs, quickly discovers that a relaxing retirement is not in the cards. Eager to solve the mystery of her handyman’s disappearance, she throws herself into the official search, despite her lack of investigative credentials. It doesn’t hurt that the lead detective, Vito Montana, is dashingly handsome. The first in a decidedly cozy series, Lions is filled with humor, heart, and stunning locales.

    The Room on Rue Amelie, by Kristin Harmel
    Harmel’s poignant novels always tug at the heartstrings, whether they concern the past (When We Meet Again), the present (The Life Intended), or both (The Sweetness of Forgetting). With Amelie, she whisks readers to occupied Paris in 1939, where three people’s lives converge: an American newlywed unsure if her marriage can last, a Jewish child fearful of deportation, and a British RAF pilot who has lost his mother to the Blitz and now finds himself cut off behind enemy lines.

    The Italian Party, by Christina Lynch
    A sumptuous, detail-rich debut packed with secrets, it’s part spy novel, part political thriller, part mystery, and part relationship drama. Oh, and there’s satirical humor, too! Party takes place in Siena, Italy, in 1956, where just-married “American innocents,” Scottie and Michael Messina, have arrived for Michael’s job with Ford tractors. There are many problems with this scenario: Scottie is protecting a troubling personal secret, Michael is hiding an explosive professional one; and he also wouldn’t mind being reunited with his former (male) lover while they’re in town. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg…

    Speak No Evil, by Uzodinma Iweala
    A stunning, powerful follow-up to Iweala’s 2005 debut Beasts of No NationSpeak takes place in an America where immigrants continue to struggle with cultural integration. A Nigerian-American senior in high school living in Washington, DC, Niru has a bright future ahead of him, including a slot at Harvard in the fall. His homosexuality is a secret he must keep from his strict Nigerian parents, whose “cure” for his “corruption” includes physical abuse and a forced visit to Nigeria, a country Niru has never considered home. His white best friend, Meredith, in an attempt to help him, makes the situation exponentially worse. Their two stories will undoubtedly stick with readers for months to come.

    I’ll be Your Blue Sky, by Marisa de los Santos
    The compelling friendship between Cornelia Brown and her surrogate daughter Clare (first explored in the bestselling, warmhearted Love Walked In and Belong to Me) continues, alternating between the present and the past. Now a grown woman, Clare is engaged to a man whose temperament swings between charming and controlling. When an elderly acquaintance, Edith, helps Clare realize the situation’s inherent danger, Clare gets a new lease on life. The two women’s stories are further connected when Clare inherits Edith’s Delaware beach house, which served as a shelter for abused women in the 1950s.

    What You Don’t Know About Charlie Outlaw, by Leah Stewart
    Charlie Outlaw, a TV actor overwhelmed by his recent fame, seeks refuge at a secluded island, where he’s kidnapped for ransom. Josie Lamar, the woman who dumped him, struggles with her own life in the spotlight—or, rather, out of it; the superhero she played on a cult TV show twenty years ago remains her defining role, and she’d love to move on with a new character. Despite their break-up, their love story isn’t over by a long shot, and readers will eagerly devour this showbiz-filled adventure.

    Not That I Could Tell, by Jessica Strawser
    Think Desperate Housewives meets Big Little Lies, with a dash of Where’d You Go, Bernadette thrown in for good measure. A thriller set in small-town Ohio, the mystery kicks off when Kristin, a soon-to-be-divorced mother of twins, disappears. The neighborhood moms can’t fathom what caused her to flee, and their curiosity about their friend’s secret forces them to examine their own home lives in greater detail.

    What new fiction are you excited to read in March?

    The post The Best New Fiction of March 2018 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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