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  • Tara Sonin 4:00 pm on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , mary jo putney, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , the madness of love, the marlowe papers, , , , , , , ,   

    25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans 

    Between fairytales, Jane Austen, and revivals of favorite TV shows from yesteryear, retellings of classic stories for today’s readers are all the rage. Shakespeare is no exception! Here are twenty-five books you’ll love if you’re a fan of the Bard.

    Miranda and Caliban, by Jacqueline Carey
    Jacqueline Carey has the unique ability to blend beautiful prose, lush world building, and lots of fascinating character development. This retelling of The Tempest stars Miranda and Caliban: the daughter of the play’s main character Prospero, who has taken them to an island for mysterious reasons…and the slave described as a monster by his master. Carey reimagines them as star-crossed lovers caught in a web of powerful people they can’t escape.

    As I Descended, by Robin Talley
    A gender-flipped, YA version of Macbeth? Sign me up! Meet Maria and Lily; inseparable, in love, and desperate to carve out a future for themselves when they feel it is in jeopardy. Maria wants to win the Cawdor Kingsley prize, but to do so, they have to get Delilah, the star student, out of the way. When Lily comes up with a plan to do so, things get bloody.

    I, Iago, by Nicole Galland
    Why did Iago insert himself into Othello’s life, causing devastation to everyone he loved? To learn the truth, you have to go back. In this clever retelling, Iago’s past is explored—as is his role in the society he exists within, as a co-conspirator in the act of convincing a man to murder the woman he loves.

    A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley
    Larry Cook is retiring, and his land should go to his daughters—but his youngest, Caroline, refuses to accept his offer. King Lear is a story about pride, family, and revenge, and this retelling brings that to life. Buried family secrets are brought to the surface, and in the end, none of its members will be the same.

    The Third Witch, by Rebecca Reisert
    Macbeth begins with three witches, and this novel delves into the story of one of them. Gilly decides to do whatever necessary to ruin Macbeth’s life, including dressing like a boy, sneaking into the castle, and inserting herself into his business. But by putting Macbeth and his wife in her sights, has she unwittingly risked herself?

    Vinegar Girl, by Anne Tyler
    A comedy, for a change of pace! The Taming of The Shrew gets the contemporary treatment when Kate, generally dissatisfied with her life, gets thrown another curveball: her father wants her to marry his assistant, Pytor, without whom his scientific research would be lost, to keep him from being deported. Hilarity ensues.

    Hag-Seed, by Margaret Atwood
    We return to The Tempest with a retelling from the author of The Handmaid’s Tale. A meta-twist on the retelling stars an artistic director of a theater putting on a production of the namesake Shakespeare play itself…but when he is betrayed, Felix winds up alone, missing his lost daughter, wishing for the day vengeance can be his. When an opportunity to teach a theater course in a prison arises, Felix sees his chance to put on his play, and put out the people whom he thought he could trust.

    If We Were Villains, by M.L. Rio
    Sometimes we forget, but Shakespeare’s plays were put on by actors…and this interesting novel combines a narrative fit for the Bard himself with the theatrical backdrop. Oliver Marks has been in jail, but no one knows the real truth of why. He was once an actor surrounded by other talented performers, but something took a turn for the dangerous in their final year at the conservatory. What is the truth? Who is the villain? Only Oliver knows, and you must decide if you believe him.

    Fool, by Christopher Moore
    The court jester always stands on the sidelines, seeing all. In this novel, Lear’s jester is named Pocket, and the story unfolds from his point of view. While their family falls apart, the fool finds a way to make you laugh despite the tragedy that inevitably approaches.

    A Wounded Name, by Dot Hutchinson
    Hamlet is about the titular character, but in this retelling, Ophelia gets the star treatment. At Elsinore Academy, Ophelia sees ghosts that even medicine cannot banish. She finds comfort in the late headmaster’s son, Dane, but together, their connection proves tragic.

    The Queens of Innis Lear, by Tessa Gratton
    This book isn’t even out yet, but I’m so excited about it I had to include it! A magical fantasy inspired by King Lear? Yes, please! Three queens battle for the rights to the throne: one, who sees revenge for her mother’s death, another determined to get an heir to secure her position, and a third who sides with her father, determined to protect him from their war.

    The Princes in the Tower, by Alison Weir
    If you’re a fan of Shakespeare’s Richard III, you will love this historical fiction novel that envisions what occurred when Richard infamously made two young princes disappear since they were a threat to his crown.

    The Marlowe Papers, by Ros Barber
    If you love Shakespeare, you should know his greatest frenemy: Christopher Marlowe. Some call him a competitor, others a collaborator…and in this novel, Marlowe reveals the truth about his death…or rather, the death he faked so he could escape being a convicted heretic. And of course, the greatest forgery of them all: that he continued to write plays in Shakespeare’s name. A rich, imaginative novel about a time mired in mystery.

    The Secret Life of William Shakespeare, by Jude Morgan
    For all of his works and his enduring legacy, William Shakespeare is still something of an enigma. This novel unravels the mystery behind his childhood, his marriage, the death of his son, and much more.

    Shylock is My Name, by Howard Jacobson
    The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare’s slightly more obscure plays (but one of my personal favorites.) About family, betrayal, faith and revenge, this story is re-interpreted for the present day where Simon Strulovitch takes the place of Shylock. His daughter Beatrice has fallen for an athlete with anti-semitic views despite the fact that she is Jewish, and eventually, Strulovich is driven to seek revenge.

    Darling Beast, by Elizabeth Hoyt
    This romance takes place in the theater, so of course Shakespeare would approve! An actress has fallen on difficult times while trying to take care of her young son. When she meets another inhabitant of the theater, a Viscount with a violent past, they both turn to one another to bring themselves out of the darkness of the wings and into the bright light of center stage.

    One Perfect Rose, by Mary Jo Putney
    Stephen has just been diagnosed with a devastating illness. Wanting to waste no time, he decides to leave the responsibilities of his life behind and travel, meeting a theater family and falling for their daughter, Rosalind. But even as they grow to love one another, Stephen knows that his curtain call is approaching…

    Exit, Pursued by a Bear, by E.K. Johnston
    This YA retelling of The Winter’s Tale involves the aftermath of one girl’s rape while at cheerleading camp. Hermione feels that she’s doomed to fulfill the legacy of every senior class in her school: a girl ends up pregnant before graduation. But instead, with her family, friends, and the community rallying around her, she defies expectations and makes the best choices for her future.

    Saving Juliet, by Suzanne Selfors
    Traveling back to Shakespeare’s time thanks to an accident of magic, Mimi and her acting partner on Broadway, Troy Summer, find themselves in the time of the Montagues and Capulets. There, she meets the real Juliet, and finds herself tempted to intervene and save the star-crossed lovers before tragedy strikes.

    New Boy, by Tracy Chevalier
    Othello takes a trip to the 1970’s in this gripping retelling. Osei is a diplomat’s son, used to traveling and never fitting in. But here, he fits with Dee, a popular girl in school…to Ian’s dismay. Many things remain the same, such as the investigation of racism, pride, and revenge. The twist? All of the characters are eleven years old, and what happens during school will change their lives forever.

    Wiliam Shakespeare’s Star Wars, by Ian Doescher
    See the story of Star Wars through a Shakespearean lens, with the Jedis, Sith Lords, and captive princesses all told through a re-imagining of Shakespeare’s play format as though it were being performed for Queen Elizabeth herself.

    Juliet Immortal, by Stacey Jay
    Here’s the truth: Juliet didn’t kill herself. Romeo murdered her to get something for himself: immortality. But in this re-imagining of the classic tragedy, Juliet may get the last word. Granted eternal life, she spends her centuries fighting back against Romeo—and that fight will become even more dangerous when she meets someone else she loves.

    Daughter of Time, by Josephine Tey
    Was Richard III as evil and cunning as history remembers him? Or was he misunderstood, forced into a difficult position by the circumstances of the time? This novel stars a Scotland Yard detective determined to find out the truth behind one of history’s most enigmatic and infamous figures.

    The Madness of Love, by Katharine Davies
    Twelfth Night is part comedy, part drama, and so is this novel about a girl named Valentina who misses her twin brother after he’s abandoned her to go traveling. She decides to disguise herself as a boy and travel after him, even if it means having to help a man she may have feelings for in his plan to find happiness with the girl he’s loved since he was young. Unrequited love, mistaken identity, and more collide.

    When You Were Mine, by Rebecca Serle
    Ah! Another character gets their turn in the spotlight. Serle’s When You Were Mine is a modern take on Romeo & Juliet, but focuses on the character of Rosaline. Remember her? She’s the girl Romeo was smitten with before meeting Juliet. In Serle’s reimagining, Juliet and Rosaline (or Rose), are former BFFs, and Rob (Romeo) and Rose have finally, finally shared a kiss. But when Juliet moves back into town, she steals Rob away from Rose, who is absolutely crushed. You get to watch literature’s most famous love story through the eyes of Rosaline, the broken-hearted, jilted former flame…and then the downward spiral Juliet sets herself on.

    What are your favorite Shakespearean retellings?

    The post 25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Tara Sonin 4:00 pm on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , mary jo putney, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , the madness of love, the marlowe papers, , , , , , , ,   

    25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans 

    Between fairytales, Jane Austen, and revivals of favorite TV shows from yesteryear, retellings of classic stories for today’s readers are all the rage. Shakespeare is no exception! Here are twenty-five books you’ll love if you’re a fan of the Bard.

    Miranda and Caliban, by Jacqueline Carey
    Jacqueline Carey has the unique ability to blend beautiful prose, lush world building, and lots of fascinating character development. This retelling of The Tempest stars Miranda and Caliban: the daughter of the play’s main character Prospero, who has taken them to an island for mysterious reasons…and the slave described as a monster by his master. Carey reimagines them as star-crossed lovers caught in a web of powerful people they can’t escape.

    As I Descended, by Robin Talley
    A gender-flipped, YA version of Macbeth? Sign me up! Meet Maria and Lily; inseparable, in love, and desperate to carve out a future for themselves when they feel it is in jeopardy. Maria wants to win the Cawdor Kingsley prize, but to do so, they have to get Delilah, the star student, out of the way. When Lily comes up with a plan to do so, things get bloody.

    I, Iago, by Nicole Galland
    Why did Iago insert himself into Othello’s life, causing devastation to everyone he loved? To learn the truth, you have to go back. In this clever retelling, Iago’s past is explored—as is his role in the society he exists within, as a co-conspirator in the act of convincing a man to murder the woman he loves.

    A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley
    Larry Cook is retiring, and his land should go to his daughters—but his youngest, Caroline, refuses to accept his offer. King Lear is a story about pride, family, and revenge, and this retelling brings that to life. Buried family secrets are brought to the surface, and in the end, none of its members will be the same.

    The Third Witch, by Rebecca Reisert
    Macbeth begins with three witches, and this novel delves into the story of one of them. Gilly decides to do whatever necessary to ruin Macbeth’s life, including dressing like a boy, sneaking into the castle, and inserting herself into his business. But by putting Macbeth and his wife in her sights, has she unwittingly risked herself?

    Vinegar Girl, by Anne Tyler
    A comedy, for a change of pace! The Taming of The Shrew gets the contemporary treatment when Kate, generally dissatisfied with her life, gets thrown another curveball: her father wants her to marry his assistant, Pytor, without whom his scientific research would be lost, to keep him from being deported. Hilarity ensues.

    Hag-Seed, by Margaret Atwood
    We return to The Tempest with a retelling from the author of The Handmaid’s Tale. A meta-twist on the retelling stars an artistic director of a theater putting on a production of the namesake Shakespeare play itself…but when he is betrayed, Felix winds up alone, missing his lost daughter, wishing for the day vengeance can be his. When an opportunity to teach a theater course in a prison arises, Felix sees his chance to put on his play, and put out the people whom he thought he could trust.

    If We Were Villains, by M.L. Rio
    Sometimes we forget, but Shakespeare’s plays were put on by actors…and this interesting novel combines a narrative fit for the Bard himself with the theatrical backdrop. Oliver Marks has been in jail, but no one knows the real truth of why. He was once an actor surrounded by other talented performers, but something took a turn for the dangerous in their final year at the conservatory. What is the truth? Who is the villain? Only Oliver knows, and you must decide if you believe him.

    Fool, by Christopher Moore
    The court jester always stands on the sidelines, seeing all. In this novel, Lear’s jester is named Pocket, and the story unfolds from his point of view. While their family falls apart, the fool finds a way to make you laugh despite the tragedy that inevitably approaches.

    A Wounded Name, by Dot Hutchinson
    Hamlet is about the titular character, but in this retelling, Ophelia gets the star treatment. At Elsinore Academy, Ophelia sees ghosts that even medicine cannot banish. She finds comfort in the late headmaster’s son, Dane, but together, their connection proves tragic.

    The Queens of Innis Lear, by Tessa Gratton
    This book isn’t even out yet, but I’m so excited about it I had to include it! A magical fantasy inspired by King Lear? Yes, please! Three queens battle for the rights to the throne: one, who sees revenge for her mother’s death, another determined to get an heir to secure her position, and a third who sides with her father, determined to protect him from their war.

    The Princes in the Tower, by Alison Weir
    If you’re a fan of Shakespeare’s Richard III, you will love this historical fiction novel that envisions what occurred when Richard infamously made two young princes disappear since they were a threat to his crown.

    The Marlowe Papers, by Ros Barber
    If you love Shakespeare, you should know his greatest frenemy: Christopher Marlowe. Some call him a competitor, others a collaborator…and in this novel, Marlowe reveals the truth about his death…or rather, the death he faked so he could escape being a convicted heretic. And of course, the greatest forgery of them all: that he continued to write plays in Shakespeare’s name. A rich, imaginative novel about a time mired in mystery.

    The Secret Life of William Shakespeare, by Jude Morgan
    For all of his works and his enduring legacy, William Shakespeare is still something of an enigma. This novel unravels the mystery behind his childhood, his marriage, the death of his son, and much more.

    Shylock is My Name, by Howard Jacobson
    The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare’s slightly more obscure plays (but one of my personal favorites.) About family, betrayal, faith and revenge, this story is re-interpreted for the present day where Simon Strulovitch takes the place of Shylock. His daughter Beatrice has fallen for an athlete with anti-semitic views despite the fact that she is Jewish, and eventually, Strulovich is driven to seek revenge.

    Darling Beast, by Elizabeth Hoyt
    This romance takes place in the theater, so of course Shakespeare would approve! An actress has fallen on difficult times while trying to take care of her young son. When she meets another inhabitant of the theater, a Viscount with a violent past, they both turn to one another to bring themselves out of the darkness of the wings and into the bright light of center stage.

    One Perfect Rose, by Mary Jo Putney
    Stephen has just been diagnosed with a devastating illness. Wanting to waste no time, he decides to leave the responsibilities of his life behind and travel, meeting a theater family and falling for their daughter, Rosalind. But even as they grow to love one another, Stephen knows that his curtain call is approaching…

    Exit, Pursued by a Bear, by E.K. Johnston
    This YA retelling of The Winter’s Tale involves the aftermath of one girl’s rape while at cheerleading camp. Hermione feels that she’s doomed to fulfill the legacy of every senior class in her school: a girl ends up pregnant before graduation. But instead, with her family, friends, and the community rallying around her, she defies expectations and makes the best choices for her future.

    Saving Juliet, by Suzanne Selfors
    Traveling back to Shakespeare’s time thanks to an accident of magic, Mimi and her acting partner on Broadway, Troy Summer, find themselves in the time of the Montagues and Capulets. There, she meets the real Juliet, and finds herself tempted to intervene and save the star-crossed lovers before tragedy strikes.

    New Boy, by Tracy Chevalier
    Othello takes a trip to the 1970’s in this gripping retelling. Osei is a diplomat’s son, used to traveling and never fitting in. But here, he fits with Dee, a popular girl in school…to Ian’s dismay. Many things remain the same, such as the investigation of racism, pride, and revenge. The twist? All of the characters are eleven years old, and what happens during school will change their lives forever.

    Wiliam Shakespeare’s Star Wars, by Ian Doescher
    See the story of Star Wars through a Shakespearean lens, with the Jedis, Sith Lords, and captive princesses all told through a re-imagining of Shakespeare’s play format as though it were being performed for Queen Elizabeth herself.

    Juliet Immortal, by Stacey Jay
    Here’s the truth: Juliet didn’t kill herself. Romeo murdered her to get something for himself: immortality. But in this re-imagining of the classic tragedy, Juliet may get the last word. Granted eternal life, she spends her centuries fighting back against Romeo—and that fight will become even more dangerous when she meets someone else she loves.

    Daughter of Time, by Josephine Tey
    Was Richard III as evil and cunning as history remembers him? Or was he misunderstood, forced into a difficult position by the circumstances of the time? This novel stars a Scotland Yard detective determined to find out the truth behind one of history’s most enigmatic and infamous figures.

    The Madness of Love, by Katharine Davies
    Twelfth Night is part comedy, part drama, and so is this novel about a girl named Valentina who misses her twin brother after he’s abandoned her to go traveling. She decides to disguise herself as a boy and travel after him, even if it means having to help a man she may have feelings for in his plan to find happiness with the girl he’s loved since he was young. Unrequited love, mistaken identity, and more collide.

    When You Were Mine, by Rebecca Serle
    Ah! Another character gets their turn in the spotlight. Serle’s When You Were Mine is a modern take on Romeo & Juliet, but focuses on the character of Rosaline. Remember her? She’s the girl Romeo was smitten with before meeting Juliet. In Serle’s reimagining, Juliet and Rosaline (or Rose), are former BFFs, and Rob (Romeo) and Rose have finally, finally shared a kiss. But when Juliet moves back into town, she steals Rob away from Rose, who is absolutely crushed. You get to watch literature’s most famous love story through the eyes of Rosaline, the broken-hearted, jilted former flame…and then the downward spiral Juliet sets herself on.

    What are your favorite Shakespearean retellings?

    The post 25 Romances for Shakespeare Fans appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Tara Sonin 11:00 am on 2017/08/29 Permalink
    Tags: a christmas to remember, an unwilling conquest, , , , , , , , , fall for romance, , , immortally yours: an argeneau novel, , , , , , mary jo putney, megan frampton, , , , , once a rebel, , , , , , , vivienne loret, , wilde in love: the wildes of lindow castle   

    Romance Fall Preview Guide: 16 Books to Get You Through the Season 

    I know, we all wish summer could last forever…but with fall fast approaching, we wanted to give you everything you need so that as the warm days dwindle, your books still have some sizzle! Here are sixteen fall romances you don’t want to miss:

    Once a Rebel, by Mary Jo Putney, August 29th
    If you love rogues who find romance, you’ll love this romance about the war of 1812. Lord Audley is tasked with finding widow Callista Brooke and bringing her back to England from where she currently is: stuck in the center of the conflict in Washington. But when Gordon arrives, he gets more than he bargained for: Callie is more than just a mission, she was his first love—and her father was the reason Gordon was convicted of a crime he did not commit.

    The Summer That Made Us, by Robyn Carr, September 5th
    Every summer ends, but none like the summer on Lake Waseka that destroyed the Hempstead sisters. Their lives are perfect: two sisters married to two brothers, all with kids of their own…until tragedy strikes, and the perfection of their summer world is drowned by death and regret. They don’t talk about what happened, until one sister decides that she will bring her family back together one last time.

    Secrets in Death, J.D. Robb, September 5th
    Lt. Eve Dallas is back in the 45th installment in this bestselling series, and this time she realizes there’s something even more deadly than a knife or a gun…secrets. When Larinda Mars, a notable professional blackmailer, is murdered, anyone with something to hide becomes a suspect.

    Wicked Deeds (Krewe of Hunters), by Heather Graham, September 19th
    Just when Vickie Preston, historian extraordinaire, and her former protector (now lover) Special Agent Griffin Pryce think they’ve outsmarted all the villains and outrun all the danger…an author is murdered, bringing their new beginning to a swift halt. Because the murder isn’t cut and dry, which means the paranormal Krewe of Hunters is needed once more, and Vickie and Griffin can’t tear themselves away from one another, or a good case.

    Archangel’s Viper, by Nalini Singh, September 26th
    Holly Chang is running from her past, struggling to accept a power she never asked for after a brutal attack. And when it becomes clear someone will take her dead—but preferably alive, for a hefty sum—she has to rely on a stalwart, strong, and seductive vampire to protect her. And he is too close to the people who hurt her for comfort.

    Chasing Christmas Eve, by Jill Shalvis, September 26th
    It’s never too early for holiday cheer…but Colbie Albright is feeling anything but cheery when she show up in the Bay Area after escaping New York and her fame as a renowned YA author. And when she ends up literally underwater and is saved by Spencer Baldwin, she wants what she knows she shouldn’t have…and come Christmas, she’ll have to go back to her old life.

    Immortally Yours: An Argeneau Novel, by Lynsay Sands, September 26th
    Eternity is inherently sexy…except when you’ve spent it in unrequited love. Beth has been in love with Scotty, a Scottish vampire, for over a century—ever since he saved her from certain devastation. But he’s never felt the same way about her…or so she thought. The truth could be more devastating than the rogue he saved her from all those years ago…that they are fated lovers, and Scotty has stayed away on purpose. The tension between them scorches the pages as Beth realizes she has to fight for what she wants.

    A Christmas to Remember, by Lisa Kleypas, Lorraine Heath, Megan Frampton, and Vivienne Loret, September 26th
    This anthology, featuring some veritable stars of the romance world, is not to be missed! The four stories include “I Will”, in which a Lord must marry a woman of worth or lose his inheritance; “Deck the Halls with Love” by Lorraine Heath, which introduces readers to the Marquess of Chetwyn, who broke Lady Meredith’s heart by proposing to someone else…and now that she’s betrothed, he wants her back; “No Groom at the Inn” by Megan Frampton, in which a bachelor tries to outsmart his own mother by pretending to have a woman in his life; and “The Duke’s Christmas Wish” by Vivienne Lorret, in which the science-minded Duke of Vale falls for a reckless and beautiful woman.

    Merry and Bright, by Debbie Macomber, October 8th
    Debbie Macomber returns with a Christmas story just hot enough to lift your spirits as the weather grows colder. She tells the story of Merry Smith, who is living the life she wants—family, career, and holiday cheer. But her mother decides to meddle and give her the gift she won’t give herself: a social life, with prospective matches galore! And while what Merry finds in the online dating world makes her happy indeed, will the fantasy come crashing down when reality sets in?

    Fairytale, by Danielle Steele, October 10th
    Camille is not living a modern fairytale, that’s for sure. Well, she was once: when her parents were in love and happy, in their family vineyard…until her mother died, and her father was swept up in the clutches of a woman who has snatched him from his wife’s memory. A wicked stepmother, two wicked stepbrothers…and a friend in the most unlikely of places make this sweet romance worthy of the title.

    Pride and Prejudice and Mistletoe, by Melissa de la Cruz, October 17th
    A gender-flipped classic is made modern in this hilarious and romantic novel by bestselling author Melissa de la Cruz. Meet Darcy, a relentless beauty who wants for nothing—not even love. She barely tolerates her family, but when her mom gets sick, she goes home to Pemberley (Ohio, lol) and meets Luke Bennet, the neighbor’s son. As relentlessly ambitious as Darcy is, Luke is her total opposite…and yet they find themselves in bed, and in a great deal of trouble.

    Duke of Desire, by Elizabeth Hoyt, October 17th
    When the infamous Lords of Chaos kidnap Lady Iris Jordan, she does whatever she can to escape…including shooting the masked man who intended to rescue her! The Duke of Dyemore wants to destroy the Lords, but by rescuing this damsel in distress, he has doomed them both to a fate they want to avoid: marriage. At least at first, until they both realize nothing can rescue them from the love they feel for each other.

    The Beautiful Ones, by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, October 24th
    Antonia is meant to find a husband during her first season in Losail, but she is harboring a secret: her telekinetic ability makes her a target for gossip, and not exactly marriageable material. Until she meets Hector Auvray, a performer who teaches her to control her magic before it consumes her. However, Antonia has no idea that the attraction she feels for Hector may be more dangerous than her own power…

    Wilde in Love: The Wildes of Lindow Castle, by Eloisa James, October 31st
    Alaric Wilde is the son of a Duke, which means he can go on and be as much of a rake as he pleases. After years abroad with a reputation that precedes itself, he returns home and meets the one woman intent on not pleasing him: Willa. But Willa keeps her true self hidden from society, and she has no intention of letting a man with no morals like Alaric into her bed, or her heart.

    An Unwilling Conquest, by Stephanie Laurens, November 1st
    Harry Lester will never love a woman, but he certainly enjoys them. That is, until he meets a widow, Lucinda, and decides that she’s the one for him. The problem? Lucinda has no interest in Harry, or his help, and can get by just fine on her own. But Harry is determined, and sooner or later, he knows Lucinda will open her heart to him.

    No Other Duke Will Do, by Grace Burrowes, November 7th
    Debt has brought down the great Julian St. David, Duke of Haverford. When his sister decides to find him a wealthy bride, he doesn’t have much choice but to abide. Elizabeth Windham is recovering from a scandal, and knows finding a husband will put the rumor mill to rest. Sparks fly between the unexpected couple, but can they overcome their respective problems to find happiness?

    The post Romance Fall Preview Guide: 16 Books to Get You Through the Season appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 8:40 pm on 2014/09/02 Permalink
    Tags: , dark blood, , mary jo putney, , , , son of no one, ultimate sins   

    Romance Roundup: An Ex-Marine, a Long-Lost Husband, and a Lovesick Demon 

    Son of No OneThis week’s romance roundup brings us a paranormal photographer, a beautiful half-mage healer, and a lonely warrior who needs some healing.

    Ultimate Sins, by Lora Leigh
    I’ll admit it, I have a soft spot for star-crossed lovers. And when one of them is an ex-marine? Miss Leigh, you are not playing fair here. The 4th book in the sultry Callahan series finds Crowe Callahan (said ex-marine) struggling with his lustful feelings for one Amelia Sorenson, who also happens to be the daughter of his family’s sworn enemy. When Amelia’s allegiances shift and she and Crowe join forces (in a manner of speaking), they know it’s only a matter of time before her father seeks revenge for her betrayal. And while Crowe’s determination to protect Amelia is as strong as his feelings for her, how will he keep her safe from her own family? (Available in paperback and NOOK on August 26)

    Son of No One, by Sherrilyn Kenyon
    When down and out Josette Landry takes a job as a photographer and camerawoman for a local paranormal group, she’s deeply skeptical of her new employers at best—but she does take something of a shine to the enigmatic, sardonic, and inarguably attractive Cadegan. Little does she know that he’s actually a demon who is doing everything he can to avoid becoming involved with her, because to do so would put whatever is left of his soul at risk. (From now on, whenever a blind date doesn’t call, I’m going to assume these are his circumstances as well.) Still, despite the danger, it takes everything in Cadegan’s power to stay away. Kenyon’s vivid imagination runs wild once again in the 18th novel in the Dark-Hunter series. (Available in Hardcover and NOOK on September 2)

    Dark Blood, by Christine Feehan
    Nothing has ever fazed Zev Hunter…until the ruthlessly efficient warrior awakes, weakened and confused, in the sacred cave of warriors and under the care of Dragonseeker clan member Branislava. Zev soon discovers that the beautiful half-mage is his lifemate, and the bond between the two grows as they work together to defeat old enemies and face new threats. The 26th novel in Feehan’s Dark series is full of satisfying twists and turns—although those new to the books should consider starting with Dark Prince. (Available in Hardcover and NOOK on September 2)

    Not Quite a Wife, by Mary Jo Putney
    Years ago, James and Laurel’s perhaps too-hasty marriage ended in disaster. Now reunited, they find themselves compelled to reconcile after a passionate encounter leads to unforeseen consequences. Although the two cared deeply for each other once, the path back to true love never did run smooth—and it will take a great deal of soul-searching and self-discovery before they’re able to embrace the people they have become, and learn to trust each other again. The 6th book in the lively and clever Lost Lords series, Not Quite a Wife features two likable characters whose pragmatic attitudes toward romance are challenged in an unexpected way. (Available in paperback and NOOK on August 26)

    What new romances are you enjoying this week?

     
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