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  • Jeff Somers 3:00 pm on 2018/06/18 Permalink
    Tags: 125 best indoor grill recipes, 66 square feet: a delicious life, 7x7 cooking: the art of cooking in a small kitchen, alex mitchell, amy pennington, apartment gardening, apartment grilling, , fire up the grill!, fresh food from small spaces, george foreman, george foreman's indoor grilling made easy, hope korenstein, ilana simon, indoor! grilling, julie and julia, julie powell, kathryn kellinger, marie viljoen, r.j. ruppenthal, rachel khoo, small space cooking, steven raichlen, the edible balcony, the little paris kitchen   

    10 Books that Make Small Space Summer Cooking Possible 

    When the weather starts heating up, we think of Summery things, like baseball, beaches—and grilling outdoors. But when most of us imagine grilling our meals, we usually picture an expansive backyard, with a deck and maybe a pool. What do you do if instead of a backyard you’ve got a fire escape, and instead of a pool you’ve got…well, nothin’? In other words, what do you do when you’re craving some fresh summer flavors but you’re living in a 300 square foot studio over a bodega?

    You might think you’ll just have to hit up your friends in the ‛burbs and guilt them into grilling for you, but you’re not the first person who’d like to squeeze a backyard experience into a tiny city space. Here are ten books that will get you all the flavor of summer no matter what kind of space you’re working with.

    Ingredients

    Apartment Gardening, by Amy Pennington
    Summer flavors mean lots of fresh vegetables and fruits—but getting really fresh stuff in the city can be a chore. Unless you cut out the middle man and just grow your own. Pennington offers a practical guide to growing your own crops in whatever open space you have at your disposal, from windowboxes in your kitchen to community garden spaces or more creative outdoor space, like growing corn in a parking strip. If you want to have something to work with when you get your indoor grilling station set up, Pennington will get you there in fine style.

    The Edible Balcony, by Alex Mitchell
    People think that to have a functioning garden that can actually put food on your plate you need a ton of open space, but Mitchell shows you otherwise. All you need is some kind of outdoor space—even the smallest balcony can be transformed into a thriving garden providing fresh ingredients for your cooking. Mitchell sets you up with all the knowledge and techniques you need to fill your scrap of fresh air—whether a balcony, terrace, fire escape, or roof garden—with delicious options for creative cooking in a small home.

    Fresh Food from Small Spaces: The Square-Inch Gardener’s Guide to Year-Round Growing, Fermenting, and Sprouting, by R.J. Ruppenthal
    What do you do if your small urban space doesn’t offer much outdoor space? Or space at all? Ruppenthal is a self-taught gardener who offers a wealth of knowledge about how to grow food in literally every scrap of space in your home, under any conditions. This sustainable, eco-friendly approach means your entire apartment, no matter how small, can be transformed into a productive gardening space that will give you the raw materials you need for great summer meals—and winter meals, too, for that matter. With serious, easy-to-follow information regarding light, watering, containers, and soil, this book answers all the questions you might have.

    Basics

    George Foreman’s Indoor Grilling Made Easy, by George Foreman, with Kathryn Kellinger
    Start with the champion of indoor grilling: George Foreman has sold tens of millions of his eponymous indoor grilling appliance, and with this book offers over 100 recipes designed to get the most out of it—grilling up a storm without once going outside. If you want to get grill flavor without setting off the fire alarms, this book is your go-to choice. Not only does it detail plenty of simple meals that can be grilled indoors, but it also offers a ton of great advice on indoor grilling in general, which is also helpful for small-space cooking.

    125 Best Indoor Grill Recipes, by Ilana Simon
    Once you’ve got an indoor grill or a small fire escape grill set up and ready to go, you’ll need ideas. Simon’s collection is specifically designed for indoor grilling, with each recipe tweaked to get the full outdoor grill experience even if you’re working in your small urban cooking space instead of sweating over a gas-powered behemoth in a big backyard. The amazing thing about this recipe book isn’t that it’s designed for indoor grilling, but that the dishes are so diverse and complex, ranging from fried chicken (yes!) to souvlaki with tzaziki sauce—all done indoors.

    Indoor! Grilling, by Steven Raichlen
    Whether you’re working on a Foreman grill, a stovetop, or even a fireplace, cooking writer and host Raichlen offers up a ton of recipes that get the most out of your indoor grilling station. Raichlen offers plenty of outside-the-box ideas, including things like fireplace rotisserie chicken and desserts involving grilled fruits and sauces, all made (and enjoyed, of course) indoors. With nearly 300 recipes, you won’t need to look too hard to find something that you can make right now, today, without ever leaving the house.

    Inspiration

    7×7 Cooking: The Art of Cooking in a Small Kitchen, by Hope Korenstein
    Small space living is the standard in many urban areas, and that means your kitchen might seem like an afterthought, with a tiny scrap of countertop, an oven that seems better suited to be extra shoe storage than a usable cooking device, and a distinct lack of a dishwasher. Korenstein offers up a step-by-step guide to making that tiny kitchen into a humming dynamo of culinary greatness. Organized by course and category, Korenstein predicates every recipe on the assumption that you can’t open your fridge and your oven at the same time, and shows you that no matter how small your space, your cooking can be grand.

    Julie and Julia, by Julie Powell
    For inspiration, look no further than Julie Powell, who famously resolved to cook every recipe in Julia Child’s classic cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking. 524 recipes in the classic French style is daunting enough, but the fact that she undertook this in a tiny apartment kitchen is all the more amazing. Anyone who looks over their own small urban cooking space and thinks they’re doomed to a summer of pizza and Chinese take out should read this and get inspired.

    66 Square Feet: A Delicious Life, by Marie Viljoen
    Viljoen isn’t just offering recipes and guidelines, she’s offering real-life experience making meals using the ingredients she finds in New York City—but mainly the ones she grows on her 66 square-foot terrace in Brooklyn. If you think cooking fresh and summery is going to see you going back and forth to a million stores hunting down ingredients, think again: Viljoen is plucking food right from her own terrace and whipping it up into amazing meals—and this book proves you can, too.

    The Little Paris Kitchen, by Rachel Khoo
    French cooking was once the standard for fine dining around the world, and remains an intimidating prospect for many people—especially people who don’t have a huge space to work in. Khoo, a cooking celebrity living the cook’s dream, breaks down classic French recipes into simple, straightforward instructions designed to mimic the approach of actual French folks who cooked these dishes not in sparkling restaurant kitchens but their own more humble spaces. If you’ve got a kitchen that looks like it was designed for dolls, this book will show you that cooking complex, amazing French-style food is 100% within your grasp.

    What small space cookbooks have helped you make the most out of apartment living?

    The post 10 Books that Make Small Space Summer Cooking Possible appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2017/12/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , julie and julia, , , , , ,   

    5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over 

    Snuggling up with a good book in the cold is one of winter’s foremost delights. Cookbooks aren’t necessarily books readers can get lost in, but food lovers can stick to reading on their favorite subject by enjoying a flavor-packed food memoir. Grab a throw blanket and a cup of tea, and enjoy one of these satiating personal histories.

    Two Towns in Provence: Map of Another Town and a Considerable Town, by M. F. K. Fisher
    Like helpings, the only thing better than one memoir is two, particularly when written by preeminent food writer, M. F. K. Fisher. Having penned 27 fantastic books, Fisher is among the most renowned American food writers. Her culinary travels through California and France provided inspiration for her food anecdotes. Here, her tale of two towns, Map of Another Town and A Considerable Town are paired together, taking the reader to picturesque places like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. These memoirs will have you dreaming of the sights and smells of the south of France, if not booking a plane ticket.

    32 Yolks: From My Mother’s Table to Working the Line, by Eric Ripert and Veronica Chambers
    Foodies flock to NYC to taste Eric Ripert’s Michelin-starred restaurant, Le Bernardin. At the upscale eatery, the Chef Ripert spoils and enchants diners with an array of delectable seafood, every bite a taste of la dolce vita. But Ripert’s life wasn’t always easy, and it was in his at times challenging childhood he found solace in his innate gift: cooking. The story is at once a tale about food and coming of age in the kitchen. And the book is much more accessible (and affordable) than a dinner at Le Bernardin.

    Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, & Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living, by Julie Powell
    Some people are more cinephiles than bibliophiles. But usually those film buffs enjoying reading the book the movie is based off of after having first savored the film. There are not that many food books as fiction books that are turned into movies but as luck would have it, this food blog/memoir was turned into a film: Julie and Julia. Starring Meryl Streep as the unique and charismatic food personality, Julia Child, the story follows a young woman, Julie, as she commits to cooking Child’s dishes daily for a year. Both movie and book are a delight, but we believe the book is best served before the film.

    Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin
    New Orleans is one of those cities that instantly conjures up images of food and fine dining. Just the mention of  “The Big Easy” sends déjà vu taste buds and smells swirling through the mind. And couple that with the surname, “Brennan,” well; brunch is pretty much served. The Brennan family of New Orleans has a long history as restaurateurs, among the most eminent is the inimitable Ella Brennan, leader of Commander’s Palace, first established in 1893. The book, whose colors recall the restaurant with its vibrant blue and white, follows the story of Brennan’s life and career. Brennan co-wrote it with one of her daughters (and restaurant partners), Ti Adelaide Martin.

    Eating Animals, by Jonathan Safran Foer
    If you like your memoir with a slice of investigative journalism, then Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is the book for you. Do not sit down expecting a nostalgic recount of the days of old. Rather, the book dips into the more sour side of eating—the farming and treatment of animals. Foer makes an empathetic storyteller, he himself having attempted (and not always succeeded) to go vegetarian, battling his love of meat against his respect for animals. The book is a lot to digest, but is worth every word.

    What food memoirs have you savored?

    The post 5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2017/12/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , julie and julia, , , , , ,   

    5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over 

    Snuggling up with a good book in the cold is one of winter’s foremost delights. Cookbooks aren’t necessarily books readers can get lost in, but food lovers can stick to reading on their favorite subject by enjoying a flavor-packed food memoir. Grab a throw blanket and a cup of tea, and enjoy one of these satiating personal histories.

    Two Towns in Provence: Map of Another Town and a Considerable Town, by M. F. K. Fisher
    Like helpings, the only thing better than one memoir is two, particularly when written by preeminent food writer, M. F. K. Fisher. Having penned 27 fantastic books, Fisher is among the most renowned American food writers. Her culinary travels through California and France provided inspiration for her food anecdotes. Here, her tale of two towns, Map of Another Town and A Considerable Town are paired together, taking the reader to picturesque places like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. These memoirs will have you dreaming of the sights and smells of the south of France, if not booking a plane ticket.

    32 Yolks: From My Mother’s Table to Working the Line, by Eric Ripert and Veronica Chambers
    Foodies flock to NYC to taste Eric Ripert’s Michelin-starred restaurant, Le Bernardin. At the upscale eatery, the Chef Ripert spoils and enchants diners with an array of delectable seafood, every bite a taste of la dolce vita. But Ripert’s life wasn’t always easy, and it was in his at times challenging childhood he found solace in his innate gift: cooking. The story is at once a tale about food and coming of age in the kitchen. And the book is much more accessible (and affordable) than a dinner at Le Bernardin.

    Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, & Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living, by Julie Powell
    Some people are more cinephiles than bibliophiles. But usually those film buffs enjoying reading the book the movie is based off of after having first savored the film. There are not that many food books as fiction books that are turned into movies but as luck would have it, this food blog/memoir was turned into a film: Julie and Julia. Starring Meryl Streep as the unique and charismatic food personality, Julia Child, the story follows a young woman, Julie, as she commits to cooking Child’s dishes daily for a year. Both movie and book are a delight, but we believe the book is best served before the film.

    Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin
    New Orleans is one of those cities that instantly conjures up images of food and fine dining. Just the mention of  “The Big Easy” sends déjà vu taste buds and smells swirling through the mind. And couple that with the surname, “Brennan,” well; brunch is pretty much served. The Brennan family of New Orleans has a long history as restaurateurs, among the most eminent is the inimitable Ella Brennan, leader of Commander’s Palace, first established in 1893. The book, whose colors recall the restaurant with its vibrant blue and white, follows the story of Brennan’s life and career. Brennan co-wrote it with one of her daughters (and restaurant partners), Ti Adelaide Martin.

    Eating Animals, by Jonathan Safran Foer
    If you like your memoir with a slice of investigative journalism, then Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is the book for you. Do not sit down expecting a nostalgic recount of the days of old. Rather, the book dips into the more sour side of eating—the farming and treatment of animals. Foer makes an empathetic storyteller, he himself having attempted (and not always succeeded) to go vegetarian, battling his love of meat against his respect for animals. The book is a lot to digest, but is worth every word.

    What food memoirs have you savored?

    The post 5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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