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  • Cristina Merrill 8:38 pm on 2018/11/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , carly bloom, , , , Fiction, , , , , katee robert, , , , , , , , ,   

    Romance Roundup: Master Vampires, Wyoming and Texas Ranchers, and Naughty Widows 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a desperate heiress who needs to pay off a blackmailer, a Wyoming rancher and single dad who gets some much-needed help, and a high-society widow who falls for the deliciously wrong kind of man. Plus: lots of vampires.

    Wyoming Legend, by Diana Palmer
    Micah Torrance may be a handsome, rugged man built to run a Wyoming ranch, but underneath that chiseled exterior is a guy who needs a bit of help. He’s got his energetic little daughter, for one, and, well, running a big Wyoming ranch is tougher than it sounds. Fortunately, he gets help from Karina Carter, a champion ice skater who is having a bit of R&R after an accident. She is eager to get back to the ice, but then she gets to know Micah and his kid and realizes that everything she truly, madly, deeply wants is much closer than she thinks. Will Micah find, ahem, enthusiastic ways to express his budding love for Karina? And will Karina realize that Micah is WAY better than any gold medal? This is the eighth book in Palmer’s Wyoming Men series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, and NOOK.)

    Unhinged, by Helen Hardt
    The love saga between ER nurse Erin Hamilton and vampire Dante Gabriel continues! Long story short: Dante bit Erin and became addicted to her blood and they now have a crazy-hot chemistry that would resuscitate a maiden aunt’s long-lost libido. The thing is, Erin isn’t sure she wants to buy into the whole vampire thing, even if Dante constantly makes her want to ditch her scrubs and bare herself to him body and soul. (Oh, Erin, please don’t fight the feelings that Dante makes you feel!) Still, they can’t stay away from each other, so now they’re going to decipher the Vampyre Texts and dodge a gang of vampire thugs. Dante also needs to deal with some major dark energy. Here’s hoping they manage to defeat all of the negative forces in their lives and just focus on each other! This is the second book in Hardt’s Blood Bond Saga series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    First Snow, by Nora Roberts
    Two stories in one! In “A Will and a Way,” Pandora McVie ends up having to spend Christmas in the Catskills with the very hunky Michael Donahue. He is the co-beneficiary of her late uncle’s will, who clearly wanted to hook these two youngsters up. Pandora is NOT a happy camper. (Um, Pandora, no offense, but Michael is gorgeous and I just did a Google image search of the Catskills and WOW they’re beautiful—so open your eyes!) In “Local Hero,” single mom Hester Wallace is working hard to make ends meet while raising her son in a Manhattan apartment. (Totally feel you, Hester! Keeping oneself alive in a Manhattan apartment is no easy feat.) Her neighbor Mitch Dempsey offers to help her out, which melts our gal’s heart. (Mitch, would you please walk my dog while you’re at it?) Will this be the last holiday season they spend unattached? (Available in paperback.)

    Love in Catalina Cove, by Brenda Jackson
    Vashti Alcindor faced a major teen pregnancy-related crisis when she was younger, so she left her hometown of Catalina Cove determined to never return. Fast forward ten-plus years, and our gal has inherited a bed and breakfast from her aunt. The establishment is in major need of some HGTV-level renovation, and Vashti decides to fix it up and give life in Catalina Cove another whirl. (Vashti, you are our inspiration!) Oh, she also meets and falls for Sawyer Grisham, the new sheriff who recently pulled her over for speeding, proving that romance can flower in the most inconvenient of circumstances. Things are going quite well until some painful secrets start to come out. Vashti, stay strong and don’t let anyone ruin your new life! And Sawyer, make sure to stick by her side throughout all of the drama – and forgive her for speeding! This is the first book in Jackson’s Catalina Cove series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Shades of Wicked, by Jeaniene Frost
    New series alert! Master vampire Ian makes no apologies for his controversial but smoldering, sexy existence. (Yep, we’re all totally fine with this.) And as for our vampire law-abiding gal, Veritas, her job is to make sure that guys like Ian, who live by their own set of rules and don’t really listen to vampire society, doesn’t get TOO out of line. (Oh, but Veritas, Ian can be so good when he’s bad!) Still, both Veritas and Ian have a bone to pick with a demon named Dagon. (We’ll put it this way: Dagon is so bad that even Veritas is willing to get a bit dirty if it means his downfall.) Ian and Veritas will need to join forces if they’re going to defeat Dagon. And if it means that she’ll occasionally get to put her hands all over Ian’s body then, well, good for you, Veritas! This is the first book in Frost’s Night Rebel series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, and NOOK.)

    The Thief, by J.R. Ward
    Sola Morte used to be on the wrong side of the law (think cat burglary and safecracking), but now she’s gone clean and is focused on taking care of her granny. She hasn’t forgotten Assail, though. He’s a vampire, and let’s just say that futures between vampires and human women are NOT looking too bright. She needs to stay away from him. Then Assail ends up in a coma, and his cousins ask Sola to chill by his bedside and give him a reason to keep going. (Oh, that we all had that chance!) Then she finds herself in the middle of a war that involves vampires and vampire enemies and lots and lots of fangs and teeth. Here’s hoping she manages to survive this vampire war—and that she and Assail figure out their future together ASAP! This is the latest book in Ward’s extensive Black Dagger Brotherhood series. (Available in paperback.)

    Archangel’s Prophecy, by Nalini Singh
    Elena Deveraux was a mortal who was turned immortal and became the consort of Archangel Raphael, and because of this she has a pretty sweet pair of wings that, ya know, allow her to live up in the clouds with him. (The ability to fly AND a hunky man to boot? Elena, you are one very lucky lady!) A major problem is brewing, though, which is that Elena is regressing and becoming more human again. She and Raphael need to figure out what the problem is ASAP before their future together becomes truly doomed. Oh, and major catastrophes are taking place around the world, and Elena and Raphael need to deal with them, too. Elena and Raphael, you can do this! We have faith in you! And when the drama is over, you should seriously consider booking a couples’ massage! This is the latest book in Singh’s Guild Hunter series. (Available in paperback, audiobook, and NOOK.)

    Barbarous, by Minerva Spencer
    Lady Daphne Davenport is a respectable widow, which means she should NOT be falling hard for the steaming hot privateer, Hugh Redvers. She’s a lady and he’s just not the kind of man she should be courting in public. She also needs to keep her distance because she miiiiight have cheated him out of lands and a title and so forth—not that Hugh knows it. (Daphne, you bad girl! We can’t wait to hear all of your juicy secrets!) Still, Daphne wouldn’t mind being pillaged and plundered by Hugh, because he puts all of those high-society dandies to shame. As for Hugh, he can’t resist our tough, beautiful gal. Here’s hoping that Daphne comes clean about everything, and that Hugh isn’t too upset with her. (Just take it inside, you two! And by “inside” we mean “to the bedroom!”) This is the second book in Spencer’s Outcasts series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Too Far Gone, by Allison Brennan
    Special Agent and total badass Lucy Kincaid is eager to enjoy some quality time this summer with her hunky husband, Sean, and her husband’s son, Jesse. Trouble is, a respected scientist whose personal and professional life was in tatters just went haywire, kept a bunch of innocent people hostage, and then died in a shootout with the FBI. Lucy needs to get to the bottom of this, but soon it seems as if someone might be out to get her. She and Jesse get into a major car accident, and other things just start to unravel from there. Will our gal be able to crack this case? Will she and her loved ones make it out safely? And when the drama is over, will she and her husband and stepson finally be able to relax and enjoy their summer? This is the latest book in Brennan’s Lucy Kincaid series. (Available in paperback, audiobook, and NOOK.)

    American Drifter, by Heather Graham and Chad Michael Murray
    Yup, you read those author names correctly! The romance writer and actor have teamed up to create a story about River, a U.S. Army veteran with PTSD. River has some major demons, so he decides to get lost in Brazil and just drift around with no end in sight. (Oh, River, we’d love nothing more than to find you and provide, ahem, comfort!) He meets a very special lady by the name of Natal, and instantly feels attracted to her, but she is the mistress of a gangster, and so he needs to tread carefully. They escape the area together, with the drug lord and his gang in pursuit. Oh, and the Brazilian government might also be involved. River and Natal, you two lovebirds just focus on escaping to a safe place, and then maybe also focus on making sweet, sweet love in a beautiful and remote mountain cabin! (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Beautiful Sinner, by Sophie Jordan
    Cruz Walsh was recently released from prison. He was accused of a crime he didn’t commit, so now he’s quite intent on making sure he only surrounds himself with people he trusts. (Good for you, buddy!) Then he gets stuck in a supply closet with Gabriella, an old high school acquaintance who looks WAY different from the days when people called her “Flabby Gabby.” (Gabriella, as far as we’re concerned, you are—and have always been—Ms. Fabulous McFabulous!) She is trying to land a major scoop that will help her career get wings—and help her get the heck out of her teeny, tiny town. But being stuck in a supply closet can be a surprisingly sexy situation that makes you want to slow things down and reevaluate your life, especially with a guy like Cruz. Here’s hoping they both get the fresh start they’re looking for! This is the fifth book in Jordan’s Devil’s Rock series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    The Runaway Princess, by Christina Dodd
    Miss Evangeline Scoffield is a sophisticated, mysterious woman—or so she would have everyone believe. She is really an orphan who recently inherited some money, so she’s intent on having a fun summer filled with expensive gowns and travel, all while pretending to be a beautiful, mysterious lady. A Very Sexy Man who is also A Crown Prince sees her and immediately realizes that she’s actually the Princess of Serephina. Oh, and she’s also supposed to be his fiancee, which didn’t totally fit in with her plans at first. (Evangeline—or is it Your Highness?—we’re all for you having a bit of fun and freedom, but have you had a chance to see this guy nekkid?) He is eager to win her over, and he’s willing to do whatever it takes. (Yes, yes, and yes!) Will he manage to win her over? And will they be able to rule together in harmony? This is the first book in Dodd’s Princess series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    The Bastard’s Bargain, by Katee Robert
    Keira O’Malley always fantasized about her wedding day, but she never imagined said wedding day would involve marriage to Dmitri Romanov. He’s a major power player in New York City who is known for his ruthless focus when it comes to taking care of business. As for Keira, she agrees to marry him only because her family is in danger. (Keira, call us delusional, but we’re actually feeling optimistic about this situation!) She doesn’t want to make marriage easy for him, but even she can’t deny that she wouldn’t mind licking a happy trail of chocolate off of his body every night. (Totally understandable, Keira. Totally understandable.) They’ll need to work together if they’re going to defeat their enemies. And when it’s over, they just might realize they actually like each other and want to stay married. Let the games begin! This is the sixth book in Robert’s O’Malley’s series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Big Bad Cowboy, by Carly Bloom
    Travis Blake experienced a lot of heartbreak in his hometown of Big Verde, Texas, so he escaped to Austin, intending to never return. Then his nephew calls him, and he’s very much in need of Travis’ help. Travis goes back, and figures he’ll sell the family ranch while he’s at it. But a very special lady by the name of Maggie is in his way. Maggie is so NOT falling for any of Travis’ charms, mainly because he is playing a role in the demise of her business. (Oh, Maggie, let’s be fair and give a shirtless Travis five minutes to explain himself! Actually, make that 10 minutes. Plus 20. A whole half hour of Travis explaining himself shirtless. Yes, that will work!) Then Maggie starts to see that Travis is actually A Good Guy and falls for him. Here’s hoping they work out a beautiful life together! This is the first book in Bloom’s Once Upon a Time in Texas series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    First Earl I See Tonight, by Anna Bennett
    David Gray, Earl of Ravenport was just jilted by his fiancee, so he’s pretty sure he’s over the whole marriage thing. Then he gets a marriage proposal from heiress and artist Miss Fiona Hartley. She wants to get married pronto because she needs her dowry to pay off a blackmailer. That blackmailer wants to destroy her sister’s reputation, and Fiona is a nice sister who does NOT want to see that happen. (Fiona, we admire your bravery and determination to protect your family!) Fiona ends up spending a week at David’s estate, which is in need of some major TLC. David is positive being in a rundown place will drive Fiona away, but she’s no delicate miss. Oh, and they both soon realize that they can’t ignore the hot chemistry between them. David and Fiona, please open your eyes to the possibilities! And get rid of that blackmailer! This is the first book in Bennett’s Debutante series. (Available in paperback and NOOK.)

    Wolf Rising, by Paige Tyler
    SWAT officer Jayden Brooks doesn’t believe in soulmates or The One or true love or any of that stuff THAT REALLY DOES EXIST! (Seriously, Jayden, open up that heart that lies beneath your chiseled pecs!) Then he rescues high school teacher Selena Rosa. She was being held hostage, and one whiff of this beautiful, sweet-smelling lady has Jayden rethinking his priorities. (Excuse me, Selena? What perfume were you wearing when you met Jayden? Please let us all know. Thanks!) As for Selena, one look at Jayden reminds her that she may be super duper buttoned up, but she is still a natural woman. They end up making out and Selena bites him, which unleashes her wolf gene. (That’s right, Selena! You unleash your inner wolf!) She starts to transform, and her wilder, more uncontrollable tendencies start coming out. Will the strong, devoted Jayden be able to keep her on track? This is the eighth book in Tyler’s SWAT series. (Available in paperback, audiobook, and NOOK.)

    The post Romance Roundup: Master Vampires, Wyoming and Texas Ranchers, and Naughty Widows appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 7:05 pm on 2018/11/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , Fiction,   

    November’s Best New Fiction 

    November is full of drama and suspense, with new offerings from fan favorites Liane Moriarty, Danielle Steel, Jeffrey Archer, and Barbara Taylor Bradford. A holiday farce and a serial-killing sister provide light and dark laughs for every mood, and Jonathan Lethem returns with his first detective story since 2000’s Motherless Brooklyn.

    Nine Perfect Strangers, by Liane Moriarty
    The Big Little Lies author is back with an addictive thriller set at a health retreat. Tranquillum House promises a total mind and body transformation for its well-to-do guests over an intense ten days. Among the group hoping for a mental and physical rebirth are a romance writer and a young woman whose troubled family is along for the ride. None of the nine have any idea what they’re in for, though some of them can’t help but wonder if they’d be better off running from the secluded resort as fast as they can.

    Beauchamp Hall, by Danielle Steel
    If you’ve ever dreamed of trading the real world for Downton Abbey, you have something in common with Winnie Farmington. Unlucky in love and career, Winnie’s love for the British television show Beauchamp Hall keeps her going when everything else feels hopeless. An impulsive trip to England to visit the town where the series is filmed leads to a magical new chapter in her life.

    Heads You Win, by Jeffrey Archer
    Archer is in excellent form with his latest book, a thrilling, surprising double storyline featuring one character with two fates. As a boy growing up in the late 1960s, Alex Karpenko flees Russia with his mother after his father is murdered by the KGB. Will the two of them emigrate to Great Britain or America? Why not both, and watch the chips fall? The tale spans thirty years and follows Alex’s opposing paths, each of which requires a return to Mother Russia and a confrontation with his past.

    Tony’s Wife, by Adriana Trigiani
    Chi Chi Donatelli’s fierce independence is incongruous with the era in which she lives: the Jersey Shore in the 1940s. She has no interest in becoming a wife or mother until she has lived out her dream of singing with her favorite orchestras, and dreamy big-band entertainer Saverio Armandonada is just the man to make that happen. Their partnership spans radio, TV, and the nightclub circuit, and their inevitable marriage is upended by World War II. But stick around, because their passionate love story is just getting started.

    Fox 8, by George Saunders (illustrated by Chelsea Cardinal)
    Fox lovers will adore this novella-length story by the award-winning Saunders, whose melancholic Lincoln in the Bardo won the 2017 Man Booker Prize. Fox 8 is considered by his pack to have his furry head in the clouds, but his curiosity about people (and his penchant for learning children’s bedtime stories by eavesdropping underneath windows) may ultimately save his brethren when it comes time to seek out food in a neighborhood beset by danger.

    Night of Miracles, by Elizabeth Berg
    An uplifting, standalone sequel to The Story of Arthur Truluv, this delicious companion novel centers on Arthur’s friend Lucille, now living in Arthur’s home and newly inspired to teach baking classes there as a means of keeping busy. Familiar faces sign up for lessons, and when a new family moves in next door, they’re folded into the group of friends and loved ones while coming to grips with a difficult health crisis.

    The Feral Detective, by Jonathan Lethem
    A Motherless Brooklyn for the west coast, Feral Detective marks Jonathan Lethem’s first detective story in nearly twenty years. The inland empire of California’s desert is the perfect locale for his brand of off-the-grid noir, in which Manhattanite Phoebe Siegler hires the detective of the title, animal-loving vagabond Charles Heist, to find her friend’s missing teenage daughter, last seen near Mount Baldy. Up-to-the-minute commentary on today’s political atmosphere, conspiracies, and cultlike thinking inject an urgency into the hallucinatory, miragelike setting.

    The Splendor Before the Dark, by Margaret George
    In 2017’s The Confessions of Young Nero, our narrator proved to be an idealistic cultivator of artistry, beauty, and athleticism. In this second and final installment, and contrary to popular belief, Nero doesn’t fiddle while Rome burns, but he does take advantage of its destruction to mold a new society from the ashes, one that’s worthy of his self-perceived glory. Though his marriage to Poppaea seems perfect, the adoration of his people constant, not everyone is pleased with the power he wields and the decisions he makes (ahem, Golden House…). A traitor in his midst is about to make this anger known, and readers will feel completely absorbed by this sensitive, complex character study.

    Master of His Fate, by Barbara Taylor Bradford
    Kicking off a new Victorian-era saga, master of historical fiction Bradford introduces us to self-made James Lionel Falconer, a charming, would-be merchant prince enjoying a secret dalliance with an older woman, and Alexis Malvern, an aristocratic but charitable-minded young woman who has no desire to wed—until she meets Sebastian Trevelyan, fifteen years her senior, and romantic yearnings sweep her away. With their parallel lives and headstrong ambitions, it’s only a matter of time before the Falconer and Merchant families collide in this detail-rich series opener.

    Come With Me, by Helen Schulman
    In this modern, tech-soaked family drama, a virtual reality “choose your own adventure” program allows users to contemplate the alternate paths their lives might have taken if multiple universes were accessible. For employee and test subject Amy, a wife and mother who fears her husband Dan is unfaithful, that means bringing her own fantasies into the mix. Dan just wishes he could have a second chance at a jet-setting journalism career, and his decisions in that regard throws his relationship with Amy and their three children into chaos and heartbreak that may or may not be fixable.

    The Adults, by Caroline Hulse
    A comedic farce that sears all the goo out of Christmas fables, The Adults centers on Matt and Claire, former spouses who share a seven-year-old daughter, Scarlett. The alleged grown-ups decide to put aside their differences and spend Christmas together at a forced-fun theme park called Happy Forest—along with their new love interests, Patrick and Alex. Scarlett also brings a plus one in the form of her imaginary and opinionated bunny, Posey. Tension escalates with hilarious and unexpected results.

    My Sister, the Serial Killer, by Oyinkan Braithwaite
    This suspenseful, mordant, and clever debut finds sisters Ayoola and Korede, who live in Lagos, Nigeria, perfecting the art of murder. Whenever beautiful, favored sibling Ayoola kills a boyfriend (three thus far), Korede, a shy, empathetic nurse, hides the crime and disposes the evidence. But when Ayoola sets her sights on Tade, a physician colleague of Korede’s whom Korede adores, the sisters’ latent sibling rivalry threatens to consume them.

    The post November’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Melissa Albert 2:00 pm on 2018/10/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , Fiction,   

    October’s Best New Fiction 

    October brings chill winds and warm comfort food, with books to match. Stephen King and Anne Rice provide the chills, with new tales of Castle Rock and the vampire Lestat, respectively; and Nicholas Sparks, Kate Morton, and Mitch Albom provide the comfort with heartfelt dramas. Jodie Picoult’s ensemble about a women’s health clinic under attack is perfect for book groups, and Jan Karon’s collection of Father Tim’s advice makes a beautiful gift for Mitford fans.

    The Clockmaker’s Daughter, by Kate Morton
    An artist’s retreat in the summer of 1862 along the banks of the Thames ends in murder, thievery, and ruination for its host and guests. A century and a half later, archivist Elodie Winslow comes across some tantalizing clues about the events of that pivotal season, which she believes may connect with her own family history. Fans of The Lake House and The Secret Keeper know Morton excels at dual timelines and complex emotions.

    Every Breath, by Nicholas Sparks
    Sparks’s twentieth book is a breathtakingly romantic story about two strangers who meet at a North Carolina beach town and change each other’s lives in unexpected ways. Lonely-hearted Hope—whose boyfriend of six years still won’t commit—has returned to her family’s cottage to sell the property in light of her father’s failing health. Tru is a safari leader from Zimbabwe who’s compelled to seek out his biological dad. Over a fateful five days, they’re brought together for something grander and more heart-wrenching than either is prepared for. Keep your Kleenex handy! 

    The Next Person You  Meet in Heaven, by Mitch Albom
    Speaking of tearjerkers, the long-anticipated sequel to Albom’s 2003 smash hit, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, will have readers alternating between smiling and sobbing, and we wouldn’t have it any other way. As a child, Annie survived a Coney Island–esque roller-coaster accident in which maintenance engineer Eddie sacrificed himself to save her. Now grown up, Annie seemingly succumbs to tragedy on her wedding day, but she still has many lessons to learn about life, loss, and love. The B&N exclusive edition contains a bonus chapter you won’t want to miss.

    A Spark of Light, by Jodi Picoult
    A thoughtful and harrowing ensemble drama set at a Mississippi women’s health clinic under attack from a gunman, Light’s timeline travels backward as we get to know the hostages and law enforcement members involved. Multiple viewpoints invite readers to empathize with each character, from the nurses, doctors, protestors, and patients trapped inside, to the hostage negotiator trying to save his injured sister and fifteen-year-old daughter. The B&N exclusive edition provides an author interview and reading group guide. 

    Elevation, by Stephen King
    Just in time for Halloween, take a trip to Castle Rock, King’s favorite spooky locale, in a novella about what it means to be a member of a community. A man with a mysterious, possibly supernatural health problem dislikes the couple next door because their dog is a nuisance to him, but when he learns their restaurant is failing due solely to the homophobia of his fellow townspeople (the restauranteurs are lesbians), he makes it his mission to stand by them and shine a light on prejudice. 

    Killing Commendatore, by Haruki Murakami (translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen)
    A lonely portrait painter going through a domestic crisis holes up in the mountain home of a famous, dementia-afflicted artist. There, the unnamed narrator teaches classes and discovers a never-before-seen, disturbing painting in the attic. The titular image has a story all its own, and a mystical, fever-dream journey ensues, denoted by the nightly ringing bells that torment our hero. Additional elements (cats, an homage to The Great Gatsby) make this an imaginative, vintage Murakami novel. 

    Blood Communion: A Tale of Prince Lestat, by Anne Rice
    Packed with appearances by Rice’s most beloved vampire creations, Communion feels like a reunion. Book thirteen in the Vampire Chronicles finds Lestat the Vampire Prince revealing how he came to rule the vampire world and how he intends to keep a peaceful court. However, Rhoshamandes has different plans for Lestat’s “Children of the Universe,” and you can bet they will involve a glorious and bloody battle.

    Bathed in Prayer: Father Tim’s Prayers, Sermons, and Reflections from the Mitford Series, by Jan Karon
    When the internationally bestselling Mitford Series began in 1989, the stories were published in the Blowing Rocket newspaper of Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Fourteen books and countless fans later, lead character Father Tim Kavanaugh, the town’s Episcopal rector, has earned a collection dedicated to his words of comfort and wisdom as explored throughout the series. Included in the compilation are inspirational essays and personal anecdotes from Karon, a former advertising executive going strong in her eighties. 

    Virgil Wander, by Leif Enger
    Greenstone, Minnesota, is a mining town in decline, but its residents are worth rooting for. When middle-aged Virgil, the town clerk, drives his car into Lake Superior, he emerges a changed man. No longer will he shy away from confrontation or accept the apparently doomed fate of the classic movie theatre he has poured his heart into. Virgil’s new roommate is a quirky Norwegian whose missing son abandoned the woman Virgil loves. As their stories twist and twine together, readers will be utterly charmed by the town’s unusual, lovable inhabitants.

    The Kennedy Debutante, by Kerri Maher
    This well-researched, compelling debut historical puts the spotlight on Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, a lesser-known figure from the famous family, as she navigates London society in the late 1930s. Her love for Billy Hartington, the future Duke of Devonshire, proves complicated because of his family’s religion (Hartington is Protestant, and the Kennedys are Catholic) but those problems pale in comparison to the war that swiftly engulfs both sides of the Atlantic. Kick throws herself into the conflict as a journalist and Red Cross volunteer, hoping beyond hope that her path will cross again with Billy’s. Readers will hope so, too.

    The post October’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 2:00 pm on 2018/09/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , Fiction,   

    September’s Best New Fiction 

    As summer bids us farewell and vacation time winds down, what could be better than curling up with a transportive book? Whether you’re in the mood for 1940s Britain, 1970s Argentina, 1990s Paris, or current-day America with all its rapid-fire twists and turns, September’s best new novels will enthrall you. Fascinating love stories, daring tales of espionage, and a new, female-driven perspective of Homer’s Iliad await.

    Hippie, by Paulo Coelho (translated by M.B. Becker)
    Anti-authoritarian protestors of 2018 will enjoy this look at a previous generation of freedom seekers and demonstrators. Brazilian author Coelho—whose groundbreaking work The Alchemist celebrated its 30th anniversary this year—draws from his real-life experiences to present an authentic journey of self-discovery set in South America and Europe in the early 1970s. From Peru, Chile, and Argentina through Amsterdam and Kathmandu, young Paulo, an aspiring writer, and his Dutch lover Karla travel via the Magic Bus, learning about themselves and their fellow passengers in what promises to be an immersive examination of original hippie culture.

    Sea Prayer, by Khaled Hosseini
    This timely, heartfelt illustrated novel, the proceeds of which will go to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), depicts the hopes and fears of a father for his young son. As the duo waits for the boat that will take them on a harrowing escape from war-torn Syria, the father composes a letter to his sleeping child, detailing the lives they once lived in their home village of Homs. Intended for all ages, it’s a good choice for parents who want to explain the refugee crisis to their kids.

    Transcription, by Kate Atkinson
    Historical spy fiction at its finest, Transcription revolves around the mysterious choices made by Juliet, a teenager recruited by MI5 in 1940. Tasked with transcribing the clandestine meetings between a double agent and British Nazi sympathizers, Juliet believes her work is finished once the war ends. But ten years later her past returns, demanding answers about the role she really played serving justice to turncoats. Fans of Atkinson’s Life After Life  (i.e., everyone) will devour this suspenseful story.

    Katerina, by James Frey
    Toggling between Paris in the early ’90s and modern-day L.A., this love story/addiction parable seems to parallel some of the more controversial aspects of Frey’s real life. As a young American living in France, eager to write books that matter, Jay scrounges and scrimps and deals drugs alongside his sexy model muse. Twenty-five years later, now a famous author, he receives a message—possibly from said ex—that throws his world off-kilter. Will revisiting their passionate struggles ignite Jay’s creativity?

    Labyrinth of the Spirits, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    The fourth and final installment of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series (which began with The Shadow of the Wind) centers on Alicia Gris, orphaned by the Spanish Civil War as a child. Now nearly thirty, and working for Madrid’s secret police, she’s entrusted with locating a government official who seems to have vanished. Solving the mystery brings her into contact with friends of her parents and proves Franco’s regime was even more corrupt than previously understood. As with the earlier books in the tetralogy, Zafon continues to lavish love (and plot points) on books, those who love them, those who write them, and those who sell them. A literary feast. 

    Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart
    Combining his trademark slapstick wit with a Greyhound bus road trip through the south and southwest, Shteyngart spins a tale set in right-this-second America, highlighting its surreal beauty and horror. Readers may not expect to root for a timepiece-obsessed hedge fund manager who abandons his American Indian wife and their autistic son for greener pastures, but watching Barry Cohen flail through his decisions in an attempt to outlast and outrun them proves satirical humor may be the best medicine in a society gone mad.

    The Silence of the Girls, by Pat Barker
    Previous Iliad / Odyssey retellings include Ransom, by David Malouf; The Song of Achilles, by Madeline Miller; and, of course Ulysses, by James Joyce. What makes Silence unique is that it focuses on the female prisoners held in Greece during the last days of the Trojan War. Briseis, the former queen of Lyrnessus, becomes Achilles’s concubine after he slaughters her family and lays waste to her city, but her struggles don’t end there; soon, Agamemnon demands that Achilles hand Briseis over to him, which changes the entire direction of the war. Barker is a master of wartime narratives, having won the Booker Prize for The Ghost Road, set during World War I.

    The post September’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 1:30 pm on 2018/08/28 Permalink
    Tags: , book haul, Fiction, summer's best thrillers,   

    Bid Summer’s Heat Farewell with 8 Chilling Thrillers 

    It’s the end of August, and we’ve about had our fill of the heat. Unfortunately, the weather isn’t likely to oblige us with cooler temperatures for at least another month, but in the meantime, we can at least try to bring down our core temperatures by catching up on the most chilling thrillers of the year so far. Note: We understand that you can not actually cool off by reading, but we’re still adding all of these to the TBR pile.

    And for just one week, you can get them all for 50% off as part of Barnes & Noble’s first ever book haul blowout! Today through September 3, shop in stores and online to get half off of 150 select titles, across genres, for all ages, and including bestsellers, new releases, and more. When you shop in stores, you’ll get a free tote with purchase of three books, while supplies last.

    The President Is Missing, by Bill Clinton and James Patterson
    Combining his personal knowledge of the presidency with Patterson’s knowledge of how to write a heart-pounding thriller, Bill Clinton spins a story about President Jonathan Lincoln Duncan, under pressure from all sides, besieged by unhappy and hostile congressional committees, a determined assassin, and an apocalyptic threat only he knows about—a computer virus that could roll the clock back to the stone age overnight. Duncan sees just one way to deal with these combined threats—he walks out of the White House, leaving his security detail behind, and takes matters into his own hands.

    The Fallen, by David Baldacci
    Baldacci’s fourth Amos Decker novel heads to the small rust-belt town of Baronville, where Decker and FBI agent Alex Jamison are visiting with Alex’s family. Baronville’s a town in decline afflicted by an opioid crisis, and dealing with a series of brutal murders marked by mysterious clues that have the local cops stymied. It’s not long before Decker, who has a perfect memory since a head injury he suffered while a pro football player, stumbles onto the next grisly homicide scene—and with his special mental abilities, begins to see a pattern that goes far beyond Baronville. When the pattern touches on people Decker cares about, the mystery becomes a personal one—just as Decker discovers reasons to doubt his perfect memory.

    Spymaster, by Brad Thor
    The 17th Scot Harvath book finds the skilled agent finally feeling his age—though he’s still the most dangerous and effective employee at private security and espionage endeavor The Carlton Group. Across Europe, someone is assassinating diplomats, and Harvath is ordered to find out who—and why. When it’s revealed to be part of a plot by Russia to leverage the NATO alliance to draw the United States into a war, Harvath is tasked with stopping the Russian plan, and he goes on the offensive, identifying and hunting down the assassins themselves. Meanwhile, the founder of the Carlton Group battles a declining mental state that means the secrets of his long career are at risk—and the new head, former CIA chief Lydia Ryan, must scramble to protect those secrets—as well as her agents in the field.

    The 17th Suspect, by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
    Patterson and Paetro return to the Women’s Murder Club for the 17th go-round in a book that focuses on Sergeant Lindsay Boxer and ADA Yuki Castellano. Boxer is approached by a homeless woman who tells her the city’s homeless population is being hunted by a killer and the police are slow-walking the investigation. When Lindsay’s initial inquiries seem to confirm this, she’s outraged and goes on the warpath—with unexpected consequences that are serious enough for her friends in the Club to urge her to step back. Meanwhile, Yuki catches a rape case involving a man accusing his female superior of assault, and she thinks she can make the charges stick. But as she moves forward, the case seems to dissolve under her, and her opponent in the courtroom finds ways of getting under her skin. As Yuki struggles, Lindsay finds herself targeted by the killer she was hunting, as both women deal with personal problems that complicate their professional lives to the breaking point.

    Cutting Edge, by Ward Larsen
    Trey DeBolt is a rescue swimmer for the Coast Guard in Alaska. During a difficult rescue, his helicopter goes down—and he wakes up in cabin by the sea in Maine. He’s got a nasty scar on the back of his head and no memory of how he got there; his nurse informs him that he’s been declared dead even as a Coast Guard investigator in Alaska finds evidence he’s still alive. His nurse tells him that he’s undergone surgery that has gifted him with incredible abilities. Just as he’s figuring out he’s part of a secretive government experiment, his nurse is killed by a team of professional assassins—assassins meant for him. A sudden vision showing him information he couldn’t possibly know saves his life—and suddenly, Trey is on the run, trying to figure out just what’s happened to him, and how to control it, before it’s too late.

    Bring Me Back, by B.A. Paris
    In this tense thriller, Finn McQuaid and his fiancée Ellen are settled into a comfortable cottage in the small village of Simonbridge, financially secure thanks to a stroke of luck on Finn’s part. Their relationship is unusual; 12 years earlier Finn was dating Ellen’s sister Layla, until Layla disappeared while driving through France with Finn, with only a Russian nesting doll near the car for a clue. Initially a suspect, Finn was cleared of the crime, and over the years, their mutual loss and desire for comfort led Ellen and Finn to forge a bond. But now, the police are suddenly telling Finn that Layla’s been seen in town, and he and Ellen start receiving strange gifts—Russian nesting dolls. It’s clear Finn hasn’t been entirely forthcoming about the circumstances of Layla’s disappearance, but unraveling the truth of what’s really happening won’t be easy.

    Tailspin, by Sandra Brown
    Rye Mallett is a ‛freight dog,’ flying cargo around the country. He accepts a strange job flying a mysterious black box through bad weather to a remote area of Georgia, where Dr. Nathaniel Lambert will meet him to accept it. As Rye approaches the small airport, someone shines a laser into the cockpit, and Rye is temporarily blinded. He survives the crash, and when he exits the plane with the box he meets Brynn O’Neal, a beautiful doctor who claims Lambert sent her in his place. Although Rye doesn’t trust her, he has no choice but to accept her help when it becomes clear that there are others seeking whatever’s in the mystery box—and that they’re willing to kill for it.

    Red Alert, by James Patterson and Marshall Karp
    The fifth NYPD Red book shows us the 1 percent of Manhattan’s elite behaving badly—and being murdered at an alarming rate. When a filmmaker’s sex games go wrong and a charity function is bombed in the same night, Detectives Zach Jordan and Kylie MacDonald of the NYPD Red division respond, putting aside their own romantic and sexual tension to protect the rich and famous. As their investigation deepens, even they are shocked at the level of depravity and corruption on display—and when their search for the truth puts powerful people in danger, they’ll have no one but each other to rely on.

    What’s the best new thriller you read in 2018?

    The post Bid Summer’s Heat Farewell with 8 Chilling Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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