Tagged: elin hilderbrand Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Jen Harper 3:00 pm on 2019/07/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , , book club readalikes, , , , , , elin hilderbrand, , emily giffin commonwealth, , , , little fires everythwere, , , , , swing time, the female persuasion, , ,   

    9 Books to Read If You Loved Mrs. Everything, June’s B&N Book Club Selection 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/do/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    The Barnes & Noble Book Club selection for June, Jennifer Weiner’s Mrs. Everything, opens in 1950s Detroit with the Kaufman family living in a house that could have been pulled from the pages of sisters Jo and Bethie’s Dick and Jane books. But life for rebellious tomboy Jo and traditional good girl Bethie turns out to be far from storybook perfect as they endure loss, trauma, and tragedy.

    In an engrossing story that unfurls against the backdrop of the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and women’s liberation, Weiner beautifully explores the complicated relationship between these two sisters, who are on very different paths, and how they ultimately find common ground. But what is a reader to do after finishing Mrs. Everything and discussing it at your local B&N Book Club meeting on July 16 at 7 p.m.? Well, we’ve rounded up your next nine reads to keep you busy until next month. Check out our readalike picks for Mrs. Everything.

    The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo
    Like Weiner’s Mrs. Everything, Lombardo’s stunning debut novel spans the decades, following one family through the many seasons of their complicated lives and loves. David and Marilyn fell in love in the 1970s and had what their daughters—Violet, Wendy, Liza, and Grace—saw as a perfect partnership filled with passion and affection. But in 2016, the four Sorrenson offspring are all struggling to replicate the relationship their parents had as they find their lives filled with tumultuous complications—addiction, an unwanted pregnancy, lies, self-doubt, and more. As the sisters uncover secrets about each other, they also begin to learn that perhaps their parents’ union wasn’t as perfect as it seemed. In the same spirit of Mrs. Everything, The Most Fun We Ever Had navigates the complexity of family dynamics in a rich page-turner that Weiner’s fans won’t be able to put down.

    Summer of ’69, by Elin Hilderbrand
    For readers who loved taking a step back in time with the Kaufman sisters in Weiner’s latest, Hilderbrand delivers a perfect warm-weather read with her new novel set against the backdrop of an iconic American summer in 1969 Nantucket. The four Levin siblings have always looked forward to spending summers at their grandmother’s house, but like everything else going on around them in America, the only constant for the family seems to be change. Blair, the oldest sister, is pregnant with twins and stuck in Boston; civil rights activist Kirby has taken a summer job elsewhere; the family’s only son, Tiger, has been drafted and sent to Vietnam; and 13-year-old Jessie is the only one at the Nantucket home with her disconnected grandmother and worried mother, who’s taken to drinking. Like Weiner, Hilderbrand weaves an intriguing tale of finding strength in siblinghood.

    City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert
    “At some point in a woman’s life, she just gets tired of being ashamed all the time,” muses Gilbert’s City of Girls protagonist Vivian Morris. “After that, she is free to become whoever she truly is.” The same sentiment could well have come from either of Weiner’s strong female leads in Mrs. Everything, and readers will be similarly drawn into Vivian’s tale, which begins in 1940 when she’s just 19 years old and follows her all the way to 89 years old, now reflecting on her life. When Vivian is expelled from Vassar in 1940, her parents send her to live in New York with her Aunt Peg, who owns a rundown theater. It’s against this backdrop that free-spirited Vivian begins to explore her own independence and sexuality, eventually becoming embroiled in a professional scandal that will impact her for years to come in Gilbert’s striking new work.

    The Female Persuasion, by Meg Wolitzer
    Writing about female power and the exploration of women’s role in society is nothing new for Wolitzer, but her latest read is especially timely and incredibly compelling. Like Mrs. Everything, The Female Persuasion deftly takes on some difficult topics like sexual assault and how these horrific events shape her heroine. Greer Kadetsky is a college freshman when she is groped at a party by a repeat offender, and in the aftermath, a friend takes Greer to see a speech by famed feminist magazine editor Faith Frank, who alters the course of Greer’s life in unimaginable ways. Wolitzer’s book about ambition, power, and what it means to be a woman in an ever-changing world is filled with complex female characters that will have readers quickly turning the pages, yet not wanting the book to end.

    First Comes Love, by Emily Giffin
    Giffin is a master when it comes to crafting tales of romance, family, and friendship, and the case is no different with First Comes Love. Much like Weiner’s Kaufman sisters, Josie and Meredith Garland had a loving relationship growing up, but following a family tragedy, their bond fractures. Now 15 years later, the anniversary of their shared loss looms, and the two women, now both in their 30s, are on very different paths. Single Josie feels like she’s done with dating but desperately wants a child. Meredith has a picture-perfect life on the outside—successful career, husband, and a 4-year-old daughter—but inside she feels restless and dissatisfied. As secrets begin to surface and the women are forced to confront the issues that pulled them apart, they also find the courage to listen to their own hearts about what’s really important.

    Commonwealth, by Ann Patchett
    Drawing on her own life story, Patchett has crafted a memorable tale of the aftermath of a drunken kiss that ultimately destroys two marriages. After Bert Cousins and Beverly Keating leave their spouses to be with each other, the six Cousins and Keatings children form a lasting bond over their shared disillusionment with their parents while spending summers together in Virginia. In her 20s, one of the siblings, Franny, shares the family’s story with a prominent author, and suddenly, the Cousins’ and Keatings’ story—including a tragic shared loss—is no longer their own. Patchet’s nonlinear timeline and rotating cast of characters show how the differing points of view affect how events both major and everyday are remembered, lending even more depth to a story sure to be loved by fans of Mrs. Everything.

    Swing Time, by Zadie Smith
    Smith expertly weaves together moments of the present day and of memories from the past in her extraordinary book about two girls who dream of being dancers—but only one has the skills to make it. Tracey, who has a white mother and a black father, is an incredible tap dancer, while her good friend—the unnamed narrator—is hampered by her flat feet. The two have a close but complicated childhood friendship, which comes to a sudden end in their early 20s, the effects of which continue to reverberate for many years to come. Readers who were enthralled with the complex relationship between the sisters in Weiner’s Mrs. Everything will love Smith’s Swing Time.

    Little Fires Everywhere, by Celeste Ng
    Those who couldn’t put Mrs. Everything down will likely find themselves staying up into the wee hours to finish Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere. In the compelling drama, free-spirited artist Mia moves with her teenage daughter, Pearl, to a home owned by the Richardson family in Shaker Heights, an affluent Cleveland suburb where everyone is expected to follow the town’s social status quo. Mia quickly befriends Elena Richardson and her family, who are all drawn to the enigmatic single mom. So when Mia opposes the Richardson’s family friends’ controversial custody battle for a Chinese-American baby, Elena Richardson turns against her, determined to uncover Mia’s closely held secrets at all costs.

    The Nest, by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney
    Lots of families have dysfunction, but the Plumb family in The Nest really kicks it up a notch. The author expertly infuses dark humor into the tale of the now-middle-aged Plumb siblings—Leo, Beatrice, Jack, and Melody—who are awaiting the division of their trust fund, or “the nest” as the foursome call it, that their father left them following his untimely death when the kids were adolescents. The nest has been growing ever since, to be divvied up when the youngest turns 40. All of the siblings are desperate to get their hands on their share of the money, only to learn that it’s now in jeopardy thanks to the medical bills of a young woman who was badly injured when a drunk and high Leo crashed his car with her as the passenger. Beatrice, Jack, and Melody all prepare to confront their brother, fresh out of rehab, in this intoxicating story of how family has the power to both let you down and pull you back up, which will surely appeal to those who have just finished Weiner’s latest read.

    What books would you recommend for readers who loved Mrs. Everything?

    The post 9 Books to Read If You Loved <i>Mrs. Everything</i>, June’s B&N Book Club Selection appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2019/05/30 Permalink
    Tags: big sky, , , , elin hilderbrand, , , , , , , mary alice monroe, , , the friends we keep, , the summer guests,   

    June’s Best New Fiction 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/do/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    This month is packed with new releases from fan favorites Jennifer Weiner, Elin Hilderbrand, Elizabeth Gilbert, Kate Atkinson and more. Let the decades fall away as you immerse yourself in historical fiction set in Manhattan in the 1940s, Detroit in the 1950s, a beachside town in the summer of 1969, and a suburb in the 1970s. If you’re headed to a college or high school reunion this year, you’ll want to pack The Friends We Keep for the trip, all about a trio of former besties who attended University together and must now sift through the wreckage of the intervening years.

    Summer of ’69, by Elin Hilderbrand
    You’ll be forgiven if you didn’t know this was Hilderbrand’s first historical; in her expert hands, the titular summer comes to life in vivid colors. The story centers on 13-year-old Jessie, who spends her summer vacation at grandma’s house in Nantucket. With her three older siblings forging their own paths, unwilling or unable to join Jessie at the annual getaway, the teen feels out of sorts, and that feeling only increases as the country around her undergoes massive change, all set against the backdrop of Civil Rights protests, space travel, and political scandals.

    Mrs. Everything, by Jennifer Weiner
    Older sister Josette (Jo) and younger sister Elisabeth (Bethie) Kaufman grew up in Detroit in the 1950s, but that’s only the beginning this story, which spans the totality of their lives, interspersed with the growth of feminism during the past 60 years. Through adolescence, college, travel, marriage and motherhood (or not), through a great many changes and upheavals happening all around them, the siblings strive to find their place in a world that often doesn’t know what to do with women—especially women who question their roles in society. Though Jo and Bethie are specific in their experiences and viewpoints, they are also stand-ins for all women—their struggles are eminently relatable, and Weiner’s writing is exquisite.

    City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert
    After her warmhearted artist-advice book, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, Gilbert returns to the loving arms of fiction with a look at the New York theatre world of the 1940s. Our octogenarian narrator, Vivian Morris, recounts the era that meant the most to her with gusto, good humor, and occasional regret. Having been kicked out of Vassar at 19, young Vivian moves in with her Aunt Peg in Manhattan and joins the eccentric family of misfits that make up the Lily Playhouse in midtown. Full of showgirls, first experiences, wartime heartache, true love, and hard-won acceptance, Girls looks to be a triumphant and moving story about finding one’s true self.

    Lost and Found, by Danielle Steel
    A single mom whose three children are now grown, photographer Maddie Allen finds her world thrown out of alignment when she suffers an accident that causes her to look back on her life and wonder: what if she’d made different choices, particularly regarding the men who came and went in her life? Determined to revisit the past with an eye toward her future, Maddie sets off on a cross-country road trip. From the east coast to the midwest and beyond, she reconnects with lost loves and attempts to figure out whether her decisions brought her and her family to the right place.

    Big Sky, by Kate Atkinson
    It’s been nine years since the previous Jackson Brodie mystery, but at long last the former military policeman turned P.I. is back with a new case that tests his personal and professional relationships like never before. What starts off as a routine “cheating spouse” case spreads like a disease into a broader murder-and-human trafficking case in the small coastal town where Brodie and his teenage son Nathan have been spending time together. The grim subject matter is balanced by Atkinson’s trademark wit and sympathetic, life-affirming characters.

    The Summer Guests, by Mary Alice Monroe
    Summer wouldn’t be summer without a new Monroe book to take to the beach. This year, however, her characters won’t be spending much time relaxing in the sand; it’s hurricane season along the South Carolina and Florida coasts, and a group of strangers find themselves seeking shelter at Grace and Charles Phillips’ horse farm in the mountains of North Carolina. The only thing the evacuees have in common is their relationship with their hosts. Whether bonding over their difficult circumstances or clashing over the personal issues they’ve all brought with them, working together to survive the storm will prove to be life-changing for each guest.

    The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo
    A remarkably rich debut set in the Chicago suburbs from the 1970s to present-day, Fun chronicles the lives of the four adult Sorenson sisters (widowed Wendy, “perfect” Violet, neurotic Liza, and secretive Grace) and their parents, David and Marilyn, whose seemingly perfect marriage is perceived by their daughters as impossible to live up to (and they may be right). By the time you finish this unputdownable family saga, you’ll believe you’re a member of the Sorenson’s Illinois clan.

    The Friends We Keep, by Jane Green            
    A reunion among three college friends forms the heart of this novel about the plans we make when we’re young versus the life we’re living a few decades on. When supermodel Evvie, actor Topher, and “perfect wife” and PR guru Maggie were roommates in the mid-1980s at West Country University in England, the world was their collective oyster. Thirty years later, career destruction, relationship burnout, and marital heartache have broken them. Having lost touch with each other (as well as their previous hopes for the future), the trio re-connect, only to realize that secrets from their past are about to resurface as well.

    The post June’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 3:47 pm on 2019/02/26 Permalink
    Tags: , charles belfoure, , elin hilderbrand, eowyn ivey, , julia kelly, , , , , winter eascapes   

    Escape Your Everyday with These Book Haul Adventures from Around the Globe 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/do/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Whether you’re bundling up against a chill wind or experiencing a flicker of spring, these books offer a perfect escape—and you can nab them for 50 percent off during Barnes & Noble’s Book Haul Blowout, from February 27 to March 4. Consider this your passport to Nigeria, France, Great Britain, China, the Caribbean, or the Alaskan wilderness, where you’ll lose yourself in the vivid stories of characters striving to make the most of their lives regardless of circumstance.

    The Leavers, by Lisa Ko 
    Lisa Ko’s debut novel The Leavers, a National Book Award finalist and winner of Barbara Kingsolver’s PEN/Bellweather Prize, presents a view of immigration that’s only grown more vital since the novel’s release in 2016. One day, 11-year-old Deming Guo’s mother, an undocumented Chinese immigrant, heads to her job at a nail salon in the Bronx and never comes back. Two white college professors eventually adopt Deming, move him to upstate New York, and rename him Daniel Wilkinson. But Deming never forgets his heritage or his mother as he searches for answers about the mystery of her disappearance.

    Purple Hibiscus, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
    In this multiple-award-winning first novel by the author of Americanah, Nigerian teenagers Kambili and her brother Jaja are pulled in two directions by their family members. At home in Enugu, they live under the thumb of their wealthy, domineering, religiously strict father, whose fierce domestic temperament belies the vital services he provides for the community. When the siblings are sent to visit their aunt in Nsukka, they learn there are other ways to live—ways that may offer fewer material comforts but don’t include bodily punishment and inconsistent messages. An immersive and emotional story that provides rich glimpses of Nigerian culture.

    The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, by Lisa See
    The bestselling, critically acclaimed author of Snow Flower and the Secret FanShanghai Girls, and China Dolls, See is beloved by readers for her depictions of female friendships and family relationships as seen through a Chinese American lens. Her latest novel is about an Akha ethnic minority girl, Li-yan, who lives in a small mountain village where tea is grown and harvested. She has a daughter out of wedlock whom she is pressured to abandon. The child is adopted by a Southern California family, but the bond between mother and daughter is never completely severed. Fans of historical fiction will appreciate the richly rendered characters, who must navigate different cultures and customs—not just east and west, but urban and rural. Bonus: keep an eye out for See’s forthcoming The Island of Sea Women in March.

    The Paris Architect, by Charles Belfoure
    To paraphrase Rick in Casablanca, Lucien Barnard “sticks his neck out for nobody,” so when he’s asked to use his considerable architecture skills to create a “priest hole” (secret hiding spot) for a Jewish businessman in 1942 France, he’s reluctant to comply. After all, if he’s caught, the punishment could be death. Soon, however, the challenge of outsmarting the Nazis who have taken over Paris, not to mention the promise of a large payday, motivate him to do his best work. When that’s not enough to keep a child safe, Lucien’s long-dormant sense of responsibility to his fellow man rises to the surface in this compelling historical written by a real architect.

    The Room on Rue Amelie, by Kristin Harmel
    Harmel’s poignant novels always tug at the heartstrings, whether they concern the past (When We Meet Again), the present (The Life Intended), or both (The Sweetness of Forgetting). With Amelie, she whisks readers to occupied Paris in 1939, where three people’s lives converge: an American newlywed unsure if her marriage can last, a Jewish child fearful of deportation, and a British RAF pilot who has lost his mother to the Blitz and now finds himself cut off behind enemy lines.

    Light Over London, by Julia Kelly
    Set in London during two timelines—present day and the 1940s—this romantic and heartbreaking story connects two women during pivotal moments in their lives. Recently divorced, modern-day Cara Hargraves is instantly intrigued by the photograph and diary she finds while working at an antique shop. The diary’s author is Louise Keene, a small-town Cornish villager who became a “gunner girl” in World War II in an attempt to serve her country while staying close to Paul Bolton, the RAF pilot she loves (but whom her family dislikes). With her neighbor Liam’s help, Cara inches closer and closer to discovering what became of Louise and the enigmatic Paul, who harbors secrets of his own.

    Winter in Paradise, by Elin Hilderbrand
    Book one of the Paradise trilogy opens with a most un-relaxing phone call to ring in the new year: 50-something Irene is horrified to learn that her affectionate, jet-setting husband Russ’s body has washed ashore on the Caribbean island of St. John after a helicopter crash. Unbeknownst to Irene, who works as a magazine editor in the Midwest, Russ has been hiding a double life from her that includes a beachfront home and an apparent mistress. Driven to uncover the truth about her duplicitous spouse, Irene flies to St. John’s with her competitive adult sons, Baker and Dash. Fans of Hilderbrand’s Nantucket-set family dramas will feel right at home in this sun-kissed new locale.

    Snow Child, by Eowyn Ivey
    “She had imagined that in the Alaska wilderness silence would be peaceful, like snow falling at night, air filled with promise but no sound, but that was not what she found.” Jack and Mabel, homesteaders in the 1920s, originally moved to Alaska to escape their heartache over not being able to bear children. Despite their sadness, the couple’s relationship remains loving and strong, and after building a snow child on a whim, they’re stunned when a seemingly magical child enters their lives soon after. But the girl, Faina, who hunts with a fox by her side, may not be who or what she seems in this exquisite debut.

    The post Escape Your Everyday with These Book Haul Adventures from Around the Globe appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Cristina Merrill 4:00 pm on 2018/06/13 Permalink
    Tags: , by invitation only, calypso, , , , , , elin hilderbrand, , , , , , , , rainy day friends, , , the cast, , the perfect couple   

    10 Beach Reads to Get You into That Summer State of Mind 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/do/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Summer is nearly here! That means plenty of time for lounging about in the great outdoors. Here are 10 page-turning stories to enjoy as you soak up the sun. Some are light and breezy, and others are a bit darker—covering everything from murders to social media scandals. There are fresh starts and betrayals and secrets. They all have one thing in common, though: They’re each filled with beautiful, colorful characters who will make you want to keep turning the pages, even when the going gets rough. (Especially when the going gets rough, actually.)

    So put on your biggest shades, slather on the SPF-whatever-you-need, and enjoy! Just don’t forget to turn over once in a while.

    The Cast, by Danielle Steel
    Hoping to dip your toes into a glamorous, Hollywood-esque story? Seek no further! Steel’s yarn is about a woman, Kait Whittier, who has a respectable magazine writing career. After meeting Zack Winter, a television producer, Kait becomes inspired to write a TV series based on her grandmother’s life. She soon finds herself in the middle of a major production filled with all kinds of people. All is going quite well, until she is confronted with a major maternal-related issue. Will she be able to get through it? And will her new inner circle help her?

    The Perfect Couple, by Elin Hilderbrand
    Fans of The Castaways and A Summer Affair will have a chance to revisit some of their favorite characters in this novel! It’s wedding season on Nantucket, which doesn’t exactly thrill the locals. (So. Many. Tourists.) Then a bride-to-be is found dead just a few hours before the ceremony was supposed to begin, and many of those who were close to her are prime suspects. Chief of Police Ed Kapenash is on the case, and he soon realizes that no lovey-dovey couple—or family, for that matter—is perfect. He’s going to have to ask some difficult questions in order to solve this case and bring the bride’s loved ones closure.

    All We Ever Wanted, by Emily Giffin
    Giffin’s latest tale is about a major incident that goes viral on social media. Nina Browning is living the good life in Nashville. Her wealthy husband just sold his tech company for a major profit, and their son got accepted to Princeton. Living a very different life is Tom Volpe, a single dad working multiple jobs to raise his daughter, Lyla, while making sure she doesn’t screw things up at her new prep school. One night, at a wild party, a scandalous photo is taken that can shake up everything these two families have worked for. Can they manage to survive the scandal and pick up the pieces of their lives?

    Calypso, by David Sedaris
    Humor book alert! Funnyman David Sedaris’s latest book is about his purchase of a beach house. This may seem like The Dream for just about anyone, but, as Sedaris learns, it’s not all fun and games. He thought it would be a relaxing retreat, but he still can’t escape the facts of life, such as middle age and mortality. There are plenty of his patented and hilarious ruminations on both in this volume, so be prepared for lots of belly laughs in spite of yourself—and maybe some stares from the people sitting nearby.

    Shelter in Place, by Nora Roberts
    Roberts’ latest book deals with a mass shooting at a mall, and how it affects the lives of the survivors for years to come. One man decides to go into law enforcement, while one woman finds a much-needed outlet in her art. Years have passed since that horrible night, but the pain still lingers, and it may not even be over yet. Let’s just say that someone bad is waiting to cause more chaos. Fans know that Roberts (and her alter writing ego, J.D. Robb) consistently delivers thrillers filled with the most wonderful human characters.   

    The High Tide Club, by Mary Kay Andrews
    Attorney Brooke Trappnell has been summoned by 99-year-old heiress Josephine Bettendorf Warrick to the old lady’s beach home. Josephine wants to make things right with the descendants of her old girl gang. They called themselves The High Tide Club back in the day, and let’s just say they used to have oodles of fun together. (Case in point: They went skinny dipping. A lot.) Of course, many things have happened since those days. Oh, and Josephine also wants Brooke to help her protect her land from greedy hands. Brooke soon finds herself in the middle of decades-old drama as she reunites everyone at Josephine’s home.

    Love and Ruin, by Paula McLain
    McLain is at it again! After the success of The Paris Wife, a fictional account of Ernest Hemingway’s marriage to Hadley Richardson, his first of multiple marriages, this new tome delves into Hemingway’s marriage with journalist Martha Gellhorn. Martha travels to Madrid to report on the Spanish Civil War and ends up crossing paths with the soon-to-be-super-famous writer. Throughout their relationship, one of her main struggles is to make sure she remains her own person, which many a modern reader can appreciate. Hemingway scholars know how this particular love story ends, but it’s still fun to read about a romance between two interesting and intelligent people with lots of inner turmoil.

    By Invitation Only, by Dorothea Benton Frank
    A wedding is about to take place, and let’s just say the bride and groom come from very different backgrounds. Fred’s family are Southern peach farmers, while Shelby comes from a wealthy Chicago family. One side is very hardworking, while the other side—or certain folks on it—have a bit of a sense of entitlement. Everyone is feeling a little bit out of their element, especially the two mothers. Will Fred and Shelby’s relationship survive class differences? And will everyone be feeling the love when Fred and Shelby say “I do?” (That is, IF they do?)

    Cottage by the Sea, by Debbie Macomber
    Annie Marlow has been through some pretty painful experiences, so she decides to hightail it to the Pacific Northwest. There she meets a colorful cast of characters, including Keaton, who helps her fix up her seaside rental cottage. He’s a very nice, zen kind of guy, which Annie really needs right now. Life is going smoothly, and then Annie gets a major opportunity thrown her way. Add to that a landlady with some major emotional walls around her and a teenager who might be in desperate need of Annie’s help, and you’ve got a page turner you won’t be able to put down.

    Rainy Day Friends, by Jill Shalvis
    Lanie Jacobs’ husband recently passed away, and she’s still getting over her grief when she discovers that she wasn’t his only wife. She’s devastated, to say the least, and she decides to make a fresh start for herself by working at the Capriotti Winery. It’s a family-run venture, and Lanie gets plenty of distraction from the noisy Capriotti family. There’s also the matter of Mark Capriotti, an Air Force veteran who is now the deputy sheriff. He and Lanie soon realize that they really like each other. Then a 21-year-old newcomer with some dark secrets shows up, which just might ruin everything that Lanie has worked for.

    The post 10 Beach Reads to Get You into That Summer State of Mind appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Tara Sonin 6:00 pm on 2018/02/27 Permalink
    Tags: a court of frost and starlight, , , a rogue of her own, , , , , ashes on the moor, , , , devil in tertan, elin hilderbrand, ella quin, , , , , his wicked charm, , hurts to love you, , , , , , , , , , , , natural blonde instincts, , , , , , the designs of lord randolph cavanaugh, , the identicals, , , the sins of lord lockwood, , the world of all souls, too wilde to wed, , we can't wait!,   

    Romance Spring Preview: 24 of Our Most Anticipated Novels 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/do/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Valentine’s Day may have come and gone, but Spring will soon be here! There is no better time for romance to bloom than when the frost thaws and our world starts to become sunnier, hotter…you get the idea. Here are 25 of our most anticipated romances coming this season.

    February

    The Identicals, by Elin Hilderbrand (February 20)
    It’s a tale as old as time: twins who couldn’t be more different, find themselves living a life where the grass is always greener, and learning something in the process. Harper is low-key, relaxed…and a complete romantic disaster. Tabitha is dignified, with a high standard for taste (and the debt to match)…not to mention a teenage daughter she can’t reign in. By switching islands and living the other sister’s life, they find a way to bury the resentments of the past, and both find hope for the future.

    Hello Stranger, by Lisa Kleypas (February 20)
    Garrett Gibson has never taken no for an answer—that’s how she became a doctor in an age and a society where women were discouraged from doing anything of the sort. She may be daring, but she’s never taken a risk in matters of the heart…until she meets Ethan Ransom, a detective for Scotland Yard, and gives into the throes of passion. But when she is pulled into a dangerous case, the stakes are raised, and she could lose more than her heart.

    A Princess in Theory, by Alyssa Cole (February 27)
    We’ve all gotten strange emails claiming we’re betrothed to an overseas prince, right? Naledi Smith knows they’re a scam, and one she doesn’t have time for. But in this case, they’re true: Prince Thabiso has been looking for the missing girl he was supposed to marry—and when he meets Naledi, she thinks he’s nothing but a regular person like her. And so he decides to play along, believing he can convince her to love the man behind the crown.

    The Marquis and I, by Ella Quin (February 27)
    Charlotte has been kidnapped, thanks to her brother-in-law’s recklessness (and the enemies he made as a result). But then she is rescued by a man even more unscrupulous, and her reputation is in tatters. She wants nothing to do with Constantine, the Marquis who rescued her…but he is determined to win her heart.

    The Sins of Lord Lockwood, by Meredith Duran (February 27)
    Liam is on a quest for revenge after his wedding to Anna was taken from him thanks to a conspiracy. But Anna has not given up on the man she loves, despite his pleas to leave him to his life of vengeance.

    March

    A Rogue of Her Own, by Grace Burrowes (March 6)
    Miss Charlotte Windham has no intention of ever marrying, and the best way to ensure that no one would ever want to marry her is a simple scandal. Lucas Sherborne is the perfect man to rope into her plan—but instead, thanks to his own desires to marry a woman of influence and wealth, they end up at the altar instead. A marriage neither one of them truly wanted turns into a love they never knew they needed.

    Ashes on the Moor, by Sarah M. Eden (March 6)
    It is 1871, and Evangeline has been sent by her grandfather to a small mill town to teach—and if she fails, she will never see her inheritance or her younger sister, the last family she has left, again. She keeps her upper-class status a secret as she finds a community in the town, bonding with Dermot, an Irish brick mason and his son…but when her secret is revealed, she must piece together the unraveling threads of her life to find a happy ending.

    High Voltage, by Karen Marie Moning (March 6)
    The Fever series continues with Dani protecting the people of Dublin against the forces of evil gathering strength beneath the surface. Her bond with Ryodan is stronger than ever, but even the immortal cannot protect her from the horrors from her past.

    With This Man, by Jodi Ellen Malpas (March 20)
    Jesse Ward is back in the new installment in this erotic romance series, and his entire world is rocked thanks to a tragic accident. Jesse and Ava were happy. But then she ends up in the hospital, and they aren’t sure she’s going to make it. Which would be bad enough…except that when she does pull through, she cannot remember him. Or anything about the last sixteen years. So Jesse is once again given a problem he might not be able to conquer: seducing his wife, and proving to her that the last sixteen years are worth remembering.

    Accidental Heroes, by Danielle Steele (March 20)
    Someone on plane A321 is going to do something terrible, and only Homeland Security agent Ben Waterman can figure out who, and how to stop them in time. In this thriller, a TSA agent informs him of a suspicious postcard with a mysterious message, and together they must rise to the occasion and become heroes to save the day.

    His Wicked Charm, by Candace Camp (March 27)
    Lilah hates Constantine Moreland. To make things worse, his twin brother married her best friend. But when his sisters are kidnapped, she helps him on the case and discovers there is more to him than meets the eye.

    Hurts to Love You, by Alisha Rai (March 27)
    Evangeline Chandler is an heiress, which means she knows the rules: don’t embarrass the family, don’t reveal your true feelings, and don’t hook up with the help. But she can’t help the attraction she feels for Gabriel, even if they can never be together. That is, until they find themselves unable to stop being together.

    Twice Bitten, by Lynsay Sands (March 27)
    Elspeth Argeneau has been alive for almost two centuries, but it’s only after getting away from her very controlling mother that she feels like she can start to experience life. Between hunting vampires, she can certainly find time for a fling. Especially with a guy who has no idea what she is.

    April

    The Thief, by J.R. Ward (April 10)
    The Black Dagger Brotherhood saga continues with the story of Sola Morte, a human woman—and former criminal—who is trying to reform herself and live the life she needs to in order to keep her grandmother safe. What she doesn’t need is a distraction, especially from Assail, the only man she’s ever truly felt something for…though she doesn’t know the truth that he is a vampire, and deals in arms with the Black Dagger Brotherhood. But when his life is in danger, Sola must risk it all to bring them together again.

    Natural Blonde Instincts, by Jill Shalvis (April 16)
    After trying to do her own thing, Kenna has decided it’s time to join the family business and prove herself capable of taking the reigns. The problem? Her boss is hot, powerful, and not falling for her feminine wiles.

    The Designs of Lord Randolph Cavanaugh, by Stephanie Laurens (April 24)
    The titular character of this historical romance is loyal only to those closest to him—for everyone else, his top priority has always been his finances. But when an investment falls through, he is torn between seeking restitution for his losses…and seeking the heart of a brilliant woman.

    A Devil of a Duke, by Madeline Hunter (April 24)
    Gabriel is a rake of the first order, used to getting everything he wants from the world, and from women. Which is why it’s incredibly frustrating to be falling for—and bedding—a woman who will give him her body, but not her name or her heart.

    May

    A Court of Frost and Starlight, by Sarah J. Maas (May 1)
    A continuation of the Court of Thorns and Roses series, this story bridges the initial three novels with the latter tales in the series. Feyre and Rhysand are rebuilding their world following a devastating conflict: love, war, loyalty, and friendship collide for another adventure in the world of the High Fae.

    Someone to Care, by Mary Balogh (May 1)
    Viola has not been able to move on from the shame and trauma of being stripped of her title after the death of her Earl husband. Not the young debutante she once was, but not ready for the grave, either, Viola isn’t sure where she fits…until she finds herself falling for the Marquess of Dorchester, a notorious rake…and a man worth risking her limited standing in society for.

    The World of All Souls, by Deborah Harkness (May 8)
    There is much more to the story of Oxford historian and witch Diana Bishop and time-traveling vampire Matthew Clairmont…and this guide to the world in which they met and fell in love reveals all!

    The High Tide Club, by Mary Kay Andrews (May 8)
    In this perfect early-spring beach read, a woman is given an arduous task by an aging heiress: find the descendants of her long-deceased friends, with whom she was not able to make amends before they died, and bring them together.

    The Other Lady Vanishes, by Amanda Quick (May 8)
    1930’s California is a place of beauty and danger when a woman escapes from a sanitarium and starts a new life, only to be tempted by a widowed businessman and drawn into a murder mystery.

    Devil in Tartan, by Julia London (May 16)
    Lottie is willing to do whatever it takes to keep her home safe, including taking her Highland clan to the ocean for illegal whiskey sales and holding a captain from a rival clan captive after an attack on her vessel. Aulay never thought he’d let himself get bound by a woman’s heart, and yet he can’t help but want to possess Lottie as much as he wants her ship.

    Too Wilde to Wed, by Eloisa James (May 29)
    Since being jilted, North went to war and cultivated a reputation for being ill-suited to marriage. But he doesn’t know that his almost-bride, Diana, never intended to hurt him, and her reputation has paid a price as well.

    The post Romance Spring Preview: 24 of Our Most Anticipated Novels appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel