Tagged: cookbooks Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Madina Papadopoulos 8:00 pm on 2018/02/28 Permalink
    Tags: beth archer brombert, beyond turkey legs, cookbooks, cooking and dining in medieval england, edward schneider, francoise sabban, greg jenkins, maggie black, massimo montanari, medieval cooking in today's kitchen, medieval kitchen: recipes from france and italy, medieval tastes: food cooking and the table, odile redon, peter brears, silvano serventi, the medieval cookbook: revised edition   

    Raise a Tankard to 5 Medieval-Inspired Cookbooks 

    The medieval feast generally conjures cinematic images of lords and ladies sitting at banquets, eating with their hands, sharing cups, and drinking mead. But to if you’d like to get a good deal more specific as to what is in those bread bowl trenchers, these five books delve deep into the what, why, where, and how of food preparation in the Middle Ages. Take a peek at these fascinating historical overviews, as the recipes look a good deal more appetizing (and complex) than Hollywood films have depicted.

    Cooking and Dining in Medieval England, by Peter Brears
    Leading British food historian Peter Brears has a cornucopia of knowledge when it comes to culinary history. (He also boasts the accomplishment of being the UK’s foremost jelly expert, thank you very much.) Hop aboard Brears’ time machine, as he travels back to the world of Medieval England, detailing the equipment used for cooking, the management of the household, and of course, recipes that would have made Medieval ladies and gentlemen swoon (hedgehog, anyone?). The book transports the reader further through lovely original illustrations by Brears that draw one fully into the culinary world of Medieval England. It’s no surprise that this delightful book received the illustrious André Simon award.

    Medieval Cooking in Today’s Kitchen, by Greg Jenkins
    Bringing turn-of-the-first-millennium gastronomy into the turn-of-the-second-millennium kitchen can be a little intimidating…(How did they get by without a Cuisinart mixer?) As the Black Forest fairies would have it, home cooks can sift the intimidation out of cooking by jumping into this distant world with Greg Jenkins’ cookbook, Medieval Cooking in Today’s Kitchen. The seventy-eight recipes include everything one needs for a full course dinner party. Astound guests with bizarre dishes like Caws Wedi Pobi Welsh Rarebit, Chawetty Tarts, and who can’t get enough of Pompys Medieval Meatballs?

    Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table, by Massimo Montanari and Beth Archer Brombert (Translator)
    For the history buff looking to find the nitty-gritty of 12th century food (but not interested in recipes), look no further than Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table. In this extensive tome, Italy’s preeminent food scholar and Medievalist, Massimo Montanari, brings his expertise together to present a captivating book on Medieval Cookery. The book follows the evolution of the culinary arts in the Middle Ages, taking an anthropological perspective on what came before it, and how the food influences contemporary eating habits. Every page is a portal to the past, every bite described is a slice of history.

    The Medieval Cookbook: Revised Edition, by Maggie Black
    Beloved British food writer, cookbook author, and culinary historian Maggie Black was a prolific writer, responsible for penning such delightful texts as The Jane Austen Cookbook. In The Medieval Cookbook, Black enchants readers not just with appetizing recipes and a hospitable voice that makes thick history digestible, but illustrations that recall the stunning illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages. The recipes are charmingly framed by stories, whether historical events or folkloric tales. Learn how to make sumptuous Almond Chicken, as well as the tempting Blancmange from The Canterbury tales.

    Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy, by Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban, Silvano Serventi, and Edward Schneider (Translator)
    If there is only space for one medieval cookbook on your shelf, then Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy is a must. Published in French in 1991 then later translated into English, the book is beloved by cooks and medievalists alike. The minds of three illustrious medieval scholars, Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban, Silvano Serventi, combine in this text to create a cookbook that tantalizes both mind and belly. The book first introduces the reader to history, then dives into a description of a traditional recipe, and finally slightly modifies it for the contemporary kitchen. Many recipes are familiar to today’s eater, like Fresh Fava Beans with Herbs, while others are a bit more remote, like the Eel Spinach Torta.

    Have you cooked any medieval feasts lately?

    The post Raise a Tankard to 5 Medieval-Inspired Cookbooks appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 5:00 pm on 2018/02/26 Permalink
    Tags: and make-now recipes by nom nom paleo, coco morante, cookbooks, henry fong, indian instant pot cookbook: traditional indian dishes made easy and fast, instant pot for two cookbook: 250 amazing instant pot recipes for 2, kathy hester, laurel randolph, make-over, michelle tam, pitre, ready or not!: 150+ make-ahead, shon brooks, the essential instant pot cookbook: fresh and foolproof recipes for your electric pressure cooker, the instant pot electric pressure cooker cookbook: easy recipes for fast & healthy meals, the life-changing magic of instant pots, the ultimate vegan cookbook for your instant pot: 80 easy and delicious plant-based recipes that you can make in half the time, urvashi   

    6 Cookbooks That’ll Make You Love Your Instant Pot Even More 

    The Instant Pot is all the rage, but sometimes it can feel a little daunting to integrate a new cooking device into your dinner prep routine. Or maybe you’re already head over heels for your IP, but you’re stuck on the same six tried-and-true recipes. Either way, we’ve combed through the stacks to find some awesome cookbooks that will help deepen your love for the do-it-all Instant Pot.

    The Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook: Easy Recipes for Fast & Healthy Meals, by Laurel Randolph
    This book counts itself among the most popular official Instant Pot cookbooks, and with the Instant Pot being a somewhat intimidating gadget for newbies, it can be helpful to get tips, tricks, and recipes right from the source. The first dozen pages include thorough, easy-to-follow operating instructions, as well as helpful conversion charts and hints specifically on the pressure cooking option for the Instant Pot. And the 100-plus recipes included are handily labeled with prep times, so you know before you start whether you’re looking at a quick 20-minute meal or 45-minutes or more. Plus, they’re simple to understand and execute and easily customizable to handle food allergies, intolerances, and preferences, making it a great guide for cooking for the whole family.

    Must-try recipe: Cinnamon-Raisin French Toast Bake

    The Essential Instant Pot Cookbook: Fresh and Foolproof Recipes for Your Electric Pressure Cooker, by Coco Morante
    Yummy go-to weekday meals that are ready in a fraction of the usual time thanks to the Instant Pot? Yes, please! This Instant Pot–authorized cookbook certainly delivers with 75 well-tested recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert. Choose from beef, pork, poultry, veggies, beans, grains, and more to be the star of your next Instant Pot creation. The cookbook includes both classic recipes—whole roasted chicken with mushroom sauce—and contemporary dishes—buttery cauliflower mashed potatoes—sure to please palates across the board. Plus, with detailed step-by-step instructions, beautiful photos throughout, and detailed instructions on converting recipes for the Instant Pot, home cooks are sure to serve up a tasty dish.

    Must-try recipe: Irish Beef and Root Vegetable Stew

    Indian Instant Pot Cookbook: Traditional Indian Dishes Made Easy and Fast, by Urvashi Pitre
    Rather than turning to the trove of takeout menus when craving chicken tikka masala or palak paneer, grab this awesome Indian cookbook and your Instant Pot for some delicious, simple, and authentic fare. The book has 50 easy-to-follow recipes that have been vetted by both Indian food experts and Instant Pot pros, so you know you’re getting the best of both worlds. Plus, it has helpful tips and tricks on using the Instant Pot and includes all sorts of information on ingredient substitutions and stocking your pantry with the right ingredients—and trust us, it’s nothing that will be crazy-hard to track down, forcing you to go to eight different stores to make one dish.

    Must-try recipe: Punjabi Lobia Black-Eyed Peas with Spinach

    Ready or Not!: 150+ Make-Ahead, Make-Over, and Make-Now Recipes by Nom Nom Paleo, by Michelle Tam and Henry Fong
    This amazingly useful bestselling cookbook is the second from the James Beard Award–nominated creators of the crazy-popular blog, app, and cookbook Nom Nom Paleo. And it’s not specifically for the Instant Pot—with more than 150 recipes for make-ahead meals, sheet pan suppers, and, yes, Instant Pot dishes, this fun book filled with easy-to-follow instructions, beautiful photographs, and comic-book illustrations has everything for on-the-go people who want to provide delicious and healthy meals for themselves and their families. It takes you through everything, from stocking your pantry, to making dinner when you only have 20 minutes, to turning leftovers into a yummy dish. This cookbook is an especially helpful addition for anyone following a paleo diet or considering the switch.

    Must-try recipe: Pressure Cooker/Slow Cooker Kalua Pig

    Instant Pot for Two Cookbook: 250 Amazing Instant Pot Recipes for 2, by Shon Brooks
    Instant Pot cooking isn’t just about preparing a meal for a big crowd or a family of four or more—sometimes you just want to make something quick and delicious for you and your plus-one. Enter the Instant Pot for Two Cookbook. With a variety of 250 recipes that make just enough food for two—less waste!—the cookbook includes simple step-by-step instructions for each dish along with preparation time, cooking time, and nutrition information listed with each recipe. And with yummy picks for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and desserts, this volume will have you covered anytime you want to break out the Instant Pot for a two-serving dish.

    Must-try recipe: Chocolate Bread Pudding

    The Ultimate Vegan Cookbook for Your Instant Pot: 80 Easy and Delicious Plant-Based Recipes That You Can Make in Half the Time, by Kathy Hester
    Instant Pot dishes don’t have to be packed with meat and melty cheese, and this awesome vegan volume proves just how easy and delicious these meals can be. Bestselling author Kathy Hester takes you through the simple instructions on using your Instant Pot for pressure cooking, steaming, sautéing, and slow cooking some delectable vegan delights. And with her layered recipes, cooks can make their entree and side dishes all at the same time. So whether you’re a tried-and-true vegan, or trying a plant-based diet for the first time, Hester’s cookbook is a must-have addition to your Instant Pot library, as it also includes an introductory guide on the ins and out of using this handy device.

    Must-try recipe: The Best Not-Refried Black Beans

    What Instant Pot books do you consider must-haves?

    The post 6 Cookbooks That’ll Make You Love Your Instant Pot Even More appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2017/12/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , cookbooks, , , , , , , , , , ,   

    5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over 

    Snuggling up with a good book in the cold is one of winter’s foremost delights. Cookbooks aren’t necessarily books readers can get lost in, but food lovers can stick to reading on their favorite subject by enjoying a flavor-packed food memoir. Grab a throw blanket and a cup of tea, and enjoy one of these satiating personal histories.

    Two Towns in Provence: Map of Another Town and a Considerable Town, by M. F. K. Fisher
    Like helpings, the only thing better than one memoir is two, particularly when written by preeminent food writer, M. F. K. Fisher. Having penned 27 fantastic books, Fisher is among the most renowned American food writers. Her culinary travels through California and France provided inspiration for her food anecdotes. Here, her tale of two towns, Map of Another Town and A Considerable Town are paired together, taking the reader to picturesque places like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. These memoirs will have you dreaming of the sights and smells of the south of France, if not booking a plane ticket.

    32 Yolks: From My Mother’s Table to Working the Line, by Eric Ripert and Veronica Chambers
    Foodies flock to NYC to taste Eric Ripert’s Michelin-starred restaurant, Le Bernardin. At the upscale eatery, the Chef Ripert spoils and enchants diners with an array of delectable seafood, every bite a taste of la dolce vita. But Ripert’s life wasn’t always easy, and it was in his at times challenging childhood he found solace in his innate gift: cooking. The story is at once a tale about food and coming of age in the kitchen. And the book is much more accessible (and affordable) than a dinner at Le Bernardin.

    Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, & Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living, by Julie Powell
    Some people are more cinephiles than bibliophiles. But usually those film buffs enjoying reading the book the movie is based off of after having first savored the film. There are not that many food books as fiction books that are turned into movies but as luck would have it, this food blog/memoir was turned into a film: Julie and Julia. Starring Meryl Streep as the unique and charismatic food personality, Julia Child, the story follows a young woman, Julie, as she commits to cooking Child’s dishes daily for a year. Both movie and book are a delight, but we believe the book is best served before the film.

    Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin
    New Orleans is one of those cities that instantly conjures up images of food and fine dining. Just the mention of  “The Big Easy” sends déjà vu taste buds and smells swirling through the mind. And couple that with the surname, “Brennan,” well; brunch is pretty much served. The Brennan family of New Orleans has a long history as restaurateurs, among the most eminent is the inimitable Ella Brennan, leader of Commander’s Palace, first established in 1893. The book, whose colors recall the restaurant with its vibrant blue and white, follows the story of Brennan’s life and career. Brennan co-wrote it with one of her daughters (and restaurant partners), Ti Adelaide Martin.

    Eating Animals, by Jonathan Safran Foer
    If you like your memoir with a slice of investigative journalism, then Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is the book for you. Do not sit down expecting a nostalgic recount of the days of old. Rather, the book dips into the more sour side of eating—the farming and treatment of animals. Foer makes an empathetic storyteller, he himself having attempted (and not always succeeded) to go vegetarian, battling his love of meat against his respect for animals. The book is a lot to digest, but is worth every word.

    What food memoirs have you savored?

    The post 5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2017/12/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , cookbooks, , , , , , , , , , ,   

    5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over 

    Snuggling up with a good book in the cold is one of winter’s foremost delights. Cookbooks aren’t necessarily books readers can get lost in, but food lovers can stick to reading on their favorite subject by enjoying a flavor-packed food memoir. Grab a throw blanket and a cup of tea, and enjoy one of these satiating personal histories.

    Two Towns in Provence: Map of Another Town and a Considerable Town, by M. F. K. Fisher
    Like helpings, the only thing better than one memoir is two, particularly when written by preeminent food writer, M. F. K. Fisher. Having penned 27 fantastic books, Fisher is among the most renowned American food writers. Her culinary travels through California and France provided inspiration for her food anecdotes. Here, her tale of two towns, Map of Another Town and A Considerable Town are paired together, taking the reader to picturesque places like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. These memoirs will have you dreaming of the sights and smells of the south of France, if not booking a plane ticket.

    32 Yolks: From My Mother’s Table to Working the Line, by Eric Ripert and Veronica Chambers
    Foodies flock to NYC to taste Eric Ripert’s Michelin-starred restaurant, Le Bernardin. At the upscale eatery, the Chef Ripert spoils and enchants diners with an array of delectable seafood, every bite a taste of la dolce vita. But Ripert’s life wasn’t always easy, and it was in his at times challenging childhood he found solace in his innate gift: cooking. The story is at once a tale about food and coming of age in the kitchen. And the book is much more accessible (and affordable) than a dinner at Le Bernardin.

    Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, & Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living, by Julie Powell
    Some people are more cinephiles than bibliophiles. But usually those film buffs enjoying reading the book the movie is based off of after having first savored the film. There are not that many food books as fiction books that are turned into movies but as luck would have it, this food blog/memoir was turned into a film: Julie and Julia. Starring Meryl Streep as the unique and charismatic food personality, Julia Child, the story follows a young woman, Julie, as she commits to cooking Child’s dishes daily for a year. Both movie and book are a delight, but we believe the book is best served before the film.

    Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin
    New Orleans is one of those cities that instantly conjures up images of food and fine dining. Just the mention of  “The Big Easy” sends déjà vu taste buds and smells swirling through the mind. And couple that with the surname, “Brennan,” well; brunch is pretty much served. The Brennan family of New Orleans has a long history as restaurateurs, among the most eminent is the inimitable Ella Brennan, leader of Commander’s Palace, first established in 1893. The book, whose colors recall the restaurant with its vibrant blue and white, follows the story of Brennan’s life and career. Brennan co-wrote it with one of her daughters (and restaurant partners), Ti Adelaide Martin.

    Eating Animals, by Jonathan Safran Foer
    If you like your memoir with a slice of investigative journalism, then Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is the book for you. Do not sit down expecting a nostalgic recount of the days of old. Rather, the book dips into the more sour side of eating—the farming and treatment of animals. Foer makes an empathetic storyteller, he himself having attempted (and not always succeeded) to go vegetarian, battling his love of meat against his respect for animals. The book is a lot to digest, but is worth every word.

    What food memoirs have you savored?

    The post 5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel