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  • Melissa Albert 2:30 pm on 2018/03/28 Permalink
    Tags: , cookbooks,   

    8 Cookbooks to Gift Mom this Mother’s Day 

    While moms should be celebrated year round, Mother’s Day is a great excuse to give the maternal figures in our lives an extra bit of love. For the moms who love cooking, these recently published books make great gifts. They’re penned by veteran cookbook authors, home improvement specialists, athletes, and fiction writers, proving that everyone has a story—and a recipe—to share.

    Giada’s Italy: My Recipes for La Dolce Vita, by Giada De Laurentiis
    “La dolce vita,” or “the sweet life,” is an Italian saying that signifies indulgent existence; for many, that means enjoying good meals in great company. Celebrity chef and Italian food specialist Giada De Laurentiis is also known for her family-centric life. In this book, she invites guests not just into her home, but into her motherland of Rome, where she shares traditional family recipes like Grilled Swordfish with Candied Lemon Salad, Bruschetta with Burrata and Kale Salsa Verde, and, to truly bring some sweetness to your life, Fennel Upside-Down Cake.

    Magnolia Table: A Collection of Recipes for Gathering, by Joanna Gaines and Marah Stets
    Together with her business partner and spouse, Chip—also her cohost on HGTV’s popular Fixer Upper—Joanna Gaines is famous for knowing her way around any house, whether it’s designing it, remodeling it, or, of course, fixing it up. Gaines also knows her way around the kitchen, and the couple opened their first restaurant, Magnolia Table, this past February. Her cookbook by the same name hits shelves in April, and is full of recipes centered around Gaines family favorites, from classic Mac and Cheese to Brussels Sprouts with Crispy Bacon, Toasted Pecans, and Balsamic Reduction.

    True Roots: A Mindful Kitchen with More Than 100 Recipes Free of Gluten, Dairy, and Refined Sugar, by Kristin Cavallari
    No gluten? No dairy? No refined sugar? No salt? What could possibly be left to cook with? In truth, an abundance of yummy ingredients. Former reality star turned writer Kristin Cavallari shares what she cooks for her family in her first cookbook, True Roots. Cavallari developed the recipes with chef Michael Kubiesa, whom she met through her husband, Jay Cutler, while Kubiesa was working as the chef of the Chicago Bears. Dishes focus on fresh and organic ingredients, ranging from simple but flavorful breakfasts like Warm Coconut Oats, to savory main courses like BBQ Chicken Salad with Pineapple Chipotle Ranch Dressing.

    Debbie Macomber’s Table: Sharing the Joy of Cooking with Family and Friends, by Debbie Macomber
    Award-winning romance author Debbie Macomber is known better for her steamy love scenes than for steaming vegetables, but she’s taking a turn from the library and to the kitchen to write about her love of cooking. Fans of her series will have fun spotting how her fiction inspired her food. Fall in love all over again…with Macomber’s tantalizing Grilled Fish Tacos with Cilantro-Lime Sauce, Honey-Chipotle Oven-Roasted Ribs, and—a natural for an author known as the queen of winter romance—Eggnog Cookies.

    Food for Life: Delicious & Healthy Comfort Food from My Table to Yours!, by Laila Ali and Leda Scheintaub
    Distinguished boxer Laila Ali not only knows how to pack a knockout punch, but can serve a knockout dinner. She has competed on hit TV Show Chopped, twice taking home the championship, and health and wellness are among her top priorities. She starts readers off with a go-to pantry shopping list, then gets into the recipes. They’re good for you, but nutritious doesn’t equal flavorless, as Ali demonstrates in Stovetop Ratatouille, West Coast Southern Greens, and Heavenly Lemon Yogurt Cake. This delicious book is dedicated to her father, Muhammad Ali.

    Chloe Flavor: Saucy, Crispy, Spicy, Vegan, by Chloe Coscarelli
    Fans of celebrity vegan chef Chloe Coscarelli will be happy to flip through the pages of her fourth cookbook, a beautiful complements to earlier books focusing on vegan basics, Italian food, and desserts. Start the morning right with Chloe’s Avocado Pesto Toast or an Almond Butter Berry Bowl, and end it with Caesar Brussel Sprouts or Hawaiian Teriyaki Sliders. Let Chloe show you vegan can be synonymous with delicious!

    Cake, by Maira Kalman and Barbara Scott-Goodman
    This enchanting cookbook book is already eye candy, and that’s before you even get to the deliciously sweet recipes between the pages. Author and illustrator Kalman’s unique illustrations have appeared in publications including the New York Times and the New Yorker, and here she teams up with food writer and cookbook designer Scott-Goodman to bring her colorful cookbook to life. Enjoy the sights, smells, and tastes of Flourless Chocolate Cake, Pavlova with Fresh Berries, and Pistachio and Almond Pound Cake.

    My American Dream: A Life of Love, Family, and Food, by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich
    Behind every impressive meal is an impressive person. Lidia Bastianich has written numerous cookbooks sharing her delicious recipes, but for those looking to set cooking aside and peek behind the curtain into a successful chef’s life, this new memoir is a must-read. Bastianich is a famous chef, cookbook author, TV personality, restaurateur, and mother to fellow food personalities Joe and Tanya Bastianich, but before fame she was a child growing up in the political turmoil of a war-torn region, forced to flee her home and find a new one. After living in a refugee camp, her family moved to the U.S., where she began her career in the kitchen. This memoir beautifully recounts her life story, and how food brought her home.

     

    The post 8 Cookbooks to Gift Mom this Mother’s Day appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 4:00 pm on 2018/03/22 Permalink
    Tags: , cookbooks, david wondrich, drink and be merry, , jaime joyce, , , moonshine: a cultural history of america's infamous liquor, , ,   

    Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze 

    When swiveling a craft cocktail in one’s hand, it’s easy to appreciate the mixologist who just made it. What can make the appreciation for the drink all the more pleasant is understanding the history, agriculture, and society behind a particular drink or liquor. These five books dip back in time to the history of drinks, both how they are made and when they were mixed. Cheers! 

    Imbibe! Updated and Revised Edition: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to “Professor” Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar, by David Wondrich
    When one thinks cocktails and history, the name ‘David Wondrich’ quickly comes to mind. Both a mixologist and a historian, Wondrich is a leader in the field of cocktail history. No booze-shelf is complete without his James Beard Award winning book, Imbibe! Through a snifter glass, the book peers back in time, beginning with “The Archaic Age” of mixology in the United States of the late 1700s, then following developments of punches, juleps, cocktails, and other delights. Wondrich knows how to mix a drink as masterfully as he turns a phrase, which makes the book not only an informative but also a gratifying read.

    The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World’s Great Drinks, by Amy Stewart
    For those who drink and wonder about the where, when, how, and why a particular liquor was made, The Drunken Botanist has the answers. The bewitching green book looks almost like a spell book, with secrets and lore to share for the curious of mind. Horticulturalist, author, bookstore owner, and blogger for Garden Rant, Amy Stewart dives deep into the plants behind alcohol. (Note: while a lot of plants and herbs that go into booze, they don’t count toward your daily servings of veggies.) The book is part history, part biology, and part chemistry, but even if you don’t know much about those subjects, Stewart presents the information in an easy-to-digest manner.

    Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails: From the Alamagoozlum to the Zombie 100 Rediscovered Recipes and the Stories Behind Them, by Ted Haigh
    Looking to travel to the past through a cocktail glass? (Who isn’t?!) This lovely book by cocktail expert and historian Ted Haigh (AKA Dr. Cocktail), dips into drink history by resurfacing long lost beverages. Learn how to make a Knickerbocker à la Monsieur, The Mother-in-Law Cocktail, and many more delicious cocktails with (almost) equally delicious sounding names. Like the title of this book, the content is tons of fun, with engaging fonts, whimsical illustrations, and a charismatic voice that speaks directly to the reader like a friend enjoying a beer—er, cocktail.

    Moonshine: A Cultural History of America’s Infamous Liquor, by Jaime Joyce
    Moonshine is perhaps one of the more elusive liquors with possibly the best name, and a slew of great nicknames as well (white lightning, choop, mountain dew, etc.). The lore of Moonshine is braided into American history, and this book takes the reader through colonial times, the American Revolution, prohibition, and onto moonshine in the modern era. Writer Jaime Joyce tells an intoxicating tale that mixes anecdotes, folklore, history, and even a few cocktails, like the Moonshine-based take on the Margarita, aptly called the ‘Moon-a-Rita.

    Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide 1862 Reprint: How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas with an introduction by Ross Bolton 
    This book isn’t an alcohol history book, but an historical cocktail recipe book. This collection of recipes was originally published in 1862, and is purported to be the first of its kind. It is written by bartender/professor, Jerry Thomas, whom David Wondrich pays homage to in the title of his book, Imbibe! With vintage recipes like Nectar for the Czar and D’Orsay Punch, this book is a nice addition for the booze book collector.

     

    The post Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 4:00 pm on 2018/03/22 Permalink
    Tags: , cookbooks, david wondrich, , jaime joyce, , , moonshine: a cultural history of america's infamous liquor, ross bolton, , ,   

    Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze 

    When swiveling a craft cocktail in one’s hand, it’s easy to appreciate the mixologist who just made it. What can make the appreciation for the drink all the more pleasant is understanding the history, agriculture, and society behind a particular drink or liquor. These five books dip back in time to the history of drinks, both how they are made and when they were mixed. Cheers! 

    Imbibe! Updated and Revised Edition: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to “Professor” Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar, by David Wondrich
    When one thinks cocktails and history, the name ‘David Wondrich’ quickly comes to mind. Both a mixologist and a historian, Wondrich is a leader in the field of cocktail history. No booze-shelf is complete without his James Beard Award winning book, Imbibe! Through a snifter glass, the book peers back in time, beginning with “The Archaic Age” of mixology in the United States of the late 1700s, then following developments of punches, juleps, cocktails, and other delights. Wondrich knows how to mix a drink as masterfully as he turns a phrase, which makes the book not only an informative but also a gratifying read.

    The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World’s Great Drinks, by Amy Stewart
    For those who drink and wonder about the where, when, how, and why a particular liquor was made, The Drunken Botanist has the answers. The bewitching green book looks almost like a spell book, with secrets and lore to share for the curious of mind. Horticulturalist, author, bookstore owner, and blogger for Garden Rant, Amy Stewart dives deep into the plants behind alcohol. (Note: while a lot of plants and herbs that go into booze, they don’t count toward your daily servings of veggies.) The book is part history, part biology, and part chemistry, but even if you don’t know much about those subjects, Stewart presents the information in an easy-to-digest manner.

    Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails: From the Alamagoozlum to the Zombie 100 Rediscovered Recipes and the Stories Behind Them, by Ted Haigh
    Looking to travel to the past through a cocktail glass? (Who isn’t?!) This lovely book by cocktail expert and historian Ted Haigh (AKA Dr. Cocktail), dips into drink history by resurfacing long lost beverages. Learn how to make a Knickerbocker à la Monsieur, The Mother-in-Law Cocktail, and many more delicious cocktails with (almost) equally delicious sounding names. Like the title of this book, the content is tons of fun, with engaging fonts, whimsical illustrations, and a charismatic voice that speaks directly to the reader like a friend enjoying a beer—er, cocktail.

    Moonshine: A Cultural History of America’s Infamous Liquor, by Jaime Joyce
    Moonshine is perhaps one of the more elusive liquors with possibly the best name, and a slew of great nicknames as well (white lightning, choop, mountain dew, etc.). The lore of Moonshine is braided into American history, and this book takes the reader through colonial times, the American Revolution, prohibition, and onto moonshine in the modern era. Writer Jaime Joyce tells an intoxicating tale that mixes anecdotes, folklore, history, and even a few cocktails, like the Moonshine-based take on the Margarita, aptly called the ‘Moon-a-Rita.

    Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide 1862 Reprint: How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas with an introduction by Ross Bolton 
    This book isn’t an alcohol history book, but an historical cocktail recipe book. This collection of recipes was originally published in 1862, and is purported to be the first of its kind. It is written by bartender/professor, Jerry Thomas, whom David Wondrich pays homage to in the title of his book, Imbibe! With vintage recipes like Nectar for the Czar and D’Orsay Punch, this book is a nice addition for the booze book collector.

     

    The post Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 8:00 pm on 2018/02/28 Permalink
    Tags: beth archer brombert, beyond turkey legs, cookbooks, cooking and dining in medieval england, edward schneider, francoise sabban, greg jenkins, maggie black, massimo montanari, medieval cooking in today's kitchen, medieval kitchen: recipes from france and italy, medieval tastes: food cooking and the table, odile redon, peter brears, silvano serventi, the medieval cookbook: revised edition   

    Raise a Tankard to 5 Medieval-Inspired Cookbooks 

    The medieval feast generally conjures cinematic images of lords and ladies sitting at banquets, eating with their hands, sharing cups, and drinking mead. But to if you’d like to get a good deal more specific as to what is in those bread bowl trenchers, these five books delve deep into the what, why, where, and how of food preparation in the Middle Ages. Take a peek at these fascinating historical overviews, as the recipes look a good deal more appetizing (and complex) than Hollywood films have depicted.

    Cooking and Dining in Medieval England, by Peter Brears
    Leading British food historian Peter Brears has a cornucopia of knowledge when it comes to culinary history. (He also boasts the accomplishment of being the UK’s foremost jelly expert, thank you very much.) Hop aboard Brears’ time machine, as he travels back to the world of Medieval England, detailing the equipment used for cooking, the management of the household, and of course, recipes that would have made Medieval ladies and gentlemen swoon (hedgehog, anyone?). The book transports the reader further through lovely original illustrations by Brears that draw one fully into the culinary world of Medieval England. It’s no surprise that this delightful book received the illustrious André Simon award.

    Medieval Cooking in Today’s Kitchen, by Greg Jenkins
    Bringing turn-of-the-first-millennium gastronomy into the turn-of-the-second-millennium kitchen can be a little intimidating…(How did they get by without a Cuisinart mixer?) As the Black Forest fairies would have it, home cooks can sift the intimidation out of cooking by jumping into this distant world with Greg Jenkins’ cookbook, Medieval Cooking in Today’s Kitchen. The seventy-eight recipes include everything one needs for a full course dinner party. Astound guests with bizarre dishes like Caws Wedi Pobi Welsh Rarebit, Chawetty Tarts, and who can’t get enough of Pompys Medieval Meatballs?

    Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table, by Massimo Montanari and Beth Archer Brombert (Translator)
    For the history buff looking to find the nitty-gritty of 12th century food (but not interested in recipes), look no further than Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table. In this extensive tome, Italy’s preeminent food scholar and Medievalist, Massimo Montanari, brings his expertise together to present a captivating book on Medieval Cookery. The book follows the evolution of the culinary arts in the Middle Ages, taking an anthropological perspective on what came before it, and how the food influences contemporary eating habits. Every page is a portal to the past, every bite described is a slice of history.

    The Medieval Cookbook: Revised Edition, by Maggie Black
    Beloved British food writer, cookbook author, and culinary historian Maggie Black was a prolific writer, responsible for penning such delightful texts as The Jane Austen Cookbook. In The Medieval Cookbook, Black enchants readers not just with appetizing recipes and a hospitable voice that makes thick history digestible, but illustrations that recall the stunning illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages. The recipes are charmingly framed by stories, whether historical events or folkloric tales. Learn how to make sumptuous Almond Chicken, as well as the tempting Blancmange from The Canterbury tales.

    Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy, by Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban, Silvano Serventi, and Edward Schneider (Translator)
    If there is only space for one medieval cookbook on your shelf, then Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy is a must. Published in French in 1991 then later translated into English, the book is beloved by cooks and medievalists alike. The minds of three illustrious medieval scholars, Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban, Silvano Serventi, combine in this text to create a cookbook that tantalizes both mind and belly. The book first introduces the reader to history, then dives into a description of a traditional recipe, and finally slightly modifies it for the contemporary kitchen. Many recipes are familiar to today’s eater, like Fresh Fava Beans with Herbs, while others are a bit more remote, like the Eel Spinach Torta.

    Have you cooked any medieval feasts lately?

    The post Raise a Tankard to 5 Medieval-Inspired Cookbooks appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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