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  • Jeff Somers 5:00 pm on 2019/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , bnstorefront-thrillers, cari mora, , ,   

    May’s Best New Thrillers 


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    Our list of the best thrillers out this month is stacked with star authors like Thomas Harris, the father of Hannibal Lecter, who delivers an entirely new story of greed and obsession; Clive Cussler, who returns with another Fargo Adventures story; and Jeffery Deaver, who is launching a taut new series. May just got a lot more exciting.

    Cari Mora, by Thomas Harris
    The author of The Silence of the Lambs delivers his first standalone novel in four decades, a tense thrilling with a most unexpectedly dangerous protagonist. It’s the story of Cari Mora, an tenuously legal immigrant working in Miami as the caretaker of a luxurious beach house, having fled violence and brutality in her home country. What Cari doesn’t know is that her life in the U.S. will be no safer: a drug cartel has buried $25 million under the house, and a group of ruthless, driven men seek to claim it. The worst of them, a sadistic fiend named Hans-Peter Schneider, is willing to do whatever it takes to get to the money, but he finds himself distracted with the beautiful Cari, and decides to claim her as part of the fortune. But Schneider soon discovers that Cari has learned how to survive the hard way, and has the skills—and the desperate drive to survive—to match his own perverse desires.

    The Oracle, by Clive Cussler and Robin Burcell
    Cussler and Burcell’s treasure hunting couple Sam and Remi Fargo have never let a little thing like the threat of a supernatural curse prevent them from tracking down the treasures of the ancient world, and they aren’t about to start now. In the 6th century, a Vandal kingdom in Africa collapsed when a bundle of sacred scrolls were stolen and a curse was laid upon the king. The scrolls were never found, and the Fargos are determined to recover them. Delaying their quest is the theft of the humanitarian supplies being delivered by their charity, which forces them to travel to Africa to ensure replacements get to their intended destination. But the couple themselves are next assailed by thieves, and Remi is taken hostage. As Sam desperately searches for her, he discovers an apparent connection between the kidnapping and the ancient scrolls. The Fargos will be tested to their limits and beyond as they struggle to survive their 11th adventure..

    The Night Window, by Dean Koontz
    Five books into Koontz’s fast-paced techno-thriller series, Jane Hawk’s struggle against the Techno Arcadians—a shadowy cabal using secret nanotech implants to control minds and souls—is at its most desperate point. Having hidden her son Travis with allies, she teams up with former FBI agent Vikram Rangnekar and adopts a new identity in order to continue the fight. Vikram, a skilled computer hacker, has an unrequited crush on Jane, and brings his own problems into the mix in the form of an Arcadian obsessed with his capture. As they work together to find a way to stop the conspiracy, the Arcadians prove just how fearsome they are—some hunt humans for sport, some hunt for Travis in order to secure leverage over Hawk, and all of them are willing to use advanced surveillance technology to control the population and eliminate any threats to their rule.

    The Never Game, by Jeffery Deaver
    Jeffrey Deaver introduces a new protagonist in Colter Shaw, the son of a survivalist who travels the country in a mobile home taking on the search for people who the proper authorities can’t—or won’t—locate. Shaw is in California to search for Sophie Mulliner, who stormed out of her father’s house after an argument and was never seen again. The police think she’s just left town, but Shaw calculates long odds that she’s still alive. He quickly finds clues pointing to an abduction, and realizes the police who missed them were either incompetent or corrupt. When another abduction occurs, and then another, Shaw begins to piece together a connection between the crimes and a shadowy video game—and the uncertain fates of the victims puts a ticking clock on his efforts to track them down and save them from a terrifying fate.

    The Paris Diversion, by Chris Pavone
    Kate Moore appears to be just another young ex-pat in Paris, living comfortably as the wife of her hedge-fund manager husband Dexter. But Kate is much more than that: she’s a CIA agent under cover so deep not even Dexter knows their marriage is a sham. Despite all that, Kate has grown bored with her pretend-small life, but her malaise is shattered by two events: a young jihadi straps a bomb to himself and stands in front of the Louvre, and one of her husband’s wealthiest clients vanishes right before making announcing a major deal. Kate only gets more excited as the connections between the two events become clear, and relishes finally being able to dive into her real work—activating hidden support networks and chasing down leads in order to solve an increasingly twisted mystery.

    Vessel, by Lisa A. Nichols
    When the space mission onboard the Sagittarius ends in calamity, Catherine Wells is the only survivor to return to Earth, where she is met with suspicion. Catherine herself isn’t quite sure what to think; after nine years in space her personal relationships are already strained, and she’s experiencing memory loss, blackouts, and violent mood swings that make reconnecting with her family back on Earth enough of a challenge, never mind piecing together the events of a disaster in space. Cal Morganson, who is leading the follow-up mission and thus has a vested interest in figuring out what went wrong the first time, begins working directly with Catherine to try and get to the bottom of the mystery. It’s a story of confused identity and desperate survival—Blake Crouch’s Dark Matter meets Andy Weir’s The Martian.

    Reaper: Threat Zero—A Sniper Novel, by Nicholas Irving with A. J. Tata
    In the next thriller from bestselling author Nicholas Irving and A.J. Tata, a retired U.S. special operations forces sniper, decorated ex-military sniper Vick Harwood returns in an explosive story that begins when a caravan of vehicles bringing the families of U.S. cabinet members to Camp David is ambushed and its passengers are brutally murdered. Harwood watches the live feed of footage captured by a fellow Ranger, Sammie Samuelson, who confesses to the attack and commits suicide live on the internet. Harwood investigates with the help of an FBI agent, Valerie Hinojosa, and soon uncovers a terrorist plot, leading to his recruitment into Team Valid, an elite team directed by the president to extract revenge on the terrorists behind the heinous act by tracking down their families and executing them. But as Harwood and his team travel the world in search of their targets, he discovers evidence that suggests nothing is as it seems, and soon, he is fighting not only for justice, but to defend his own closely held moral code.

    What new books are thrilling you this month?

    The post May’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 9:00 pm on 2019/04/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , bnstorefront-thrillers, ,   

    April’s Best Thrillers 


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    Redemption, by David Baldacci
    Amos Decker, the Memory Man with the perfect recall, returns in more ways than one in Baldacci’s latest as he heads back to his hometown of Burlington, Ohio, with FBI partner Alex Jamison along for the ride. There, Decker meets Meryl Hawkins, the first person he ever arrested. Hawkins was convicted of murder and has spent years in jail, emerging ravaged by time and illness. Even as he’s dying, Hawkins insists to Decker that he didn’t commit those crimes, and Decker is shaken by the possibility that he made a youthful mistake that sent an innocent man to jail. Digging into the case, Decker discovers a connection to another crime—one that hasn’t been committed yet, and which he might be able to put a stop to if he can solve the puzzle in time.

    The 18th Abduction, by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
    Three teachers head out for a fun night in San Francisco after class, but their adventure turns deadly when the trio is abducted, tortured, and murdered. When one of their bodies is discovered, Detective Lindsay Boxer catches the case that has the city worrying over the safety and security of the entire school system. Lindsay turns to her best friend, investigative reporter Cindy Thomas, for help, and the fresh perspective reveals unexpected facets of the victims. The Women’s Murder Club must work together like never before to protect their families and their city from a terrifying threat.

    Neon Prey, by John Sandford
    When Howell Paine fails to pay back the money he owes loan shark Roger Smith, Smith sends violent thug Clayton Deese to punish him. But Paine fights back with an unexpected ferocity, and Deese is jammed up on racketeering charges. When Deese escapes his ankle bracelet and investigators discover partially-eaten bodies buried in his backyard, Lucas Davenport takes an interest and begins tracking the killer and the brutal gang he travels with as they journey across the country, pulling jobs to fuel their gambling and drug use. Worried that Deese is an unstable source of dire secrets that could ruin him, Smith decides he has to go, setting up a tense three-way game of cat-and-mouse Davenport fans are sure to love.

    I Know Who You Are: A Novel, by Alice Feeney
    When actress Aimee Sinclair’s husband Ben disappears from their London townhouse the day after a terrible fight, the police center their investigation on her. After security footage of a woman that looks a lot like Aimee cleaning out their bank accounts turns up, they suspect she’s hiding something—and she is, though it’s not what the police think. Aimee definitely has a secret, one she’s now convinced someone knows and is using against her. Juggling the investigation and an audition for a high-profile role in a disturbing, career-making film, Aimee slowly reveals her shocking past even as the present-day mystery develops, one unexpected clue at a time.

    Collusion, by Newt Gingrich and Pete Earley
    With a title guaranteed to catch your eye, long-time political insider Gingrich and co-writer Earley deliver an action thriller ripped from the headlines. When the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine is killed by terrorists, disgraced former Navy SEAL Brett Garrett is tasked with conveying an encrypted thumb drive to the president himself. The drive reveals that a high-ranking member of the Russian government intends to defect, and it falls on Garrett and the FBI’s expert on domestic terrorism, Valerie Mayberry, to bring him in and prevent a deadly poison attack on American soil. Standing in his way: corrupt politics, liberal protesters, and deadly enemies.

    Saving Meghan, by D.J. Palmer
    Meghan Gerard was once a vibrant star athlete with a bright future. But by age 15, she’s frequently with a broad range of mysterious ailments that her medical team can’t seem to explain. On the surface, her wealthy parents are devoted to her, especially her mother, Becky, but when Meghan takes a turn for the worse, the doctors begin to openly wonder if Becky is perhaps keeping Meghan sick in a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Becky finds herself racing against time to prove that Meghan is truly sick and in desperate need of help—and she’ll have to face her own dark history and family secrets along the way.

    The Mother-in-Law, by Sally Hepworth
    This tense thriller will appeal to anyone who’s ever had a less-than-friendly relationship with the in-laws. When Lucy marries Ollie, everything is perfect—except for her relationship with his mother Diana. A beloved member of the community, Diana is faultlessly polite and outwardly kind, but Lucy knows the woman doesn’t like her. When Diana appears to kill herself, leaving a note behind stating that she doesn’t want to live through the breast cancer she’s been diagnosed with, everyone is shocked. But what’s more shocking is the autopsy that finds no cancer whatsoever—but plenty of evidence that Diana was murdered. The revelation of changes to her will mean everyone in the family suddenly has a motive, and as the truth comes out, one thing is certain: the family will never be the same.

    True Believer, by Jack Carr
    Carr follows up The Terminal List with a thriller with an explosive twist: the most famous domestic terrorist in American history, former Navy SEAL James Reece, isn’t punished for pursuing his violent revenge on those who killed his family and colleagues. Instead, he’s recruited by the CIA as the one man who can turn the Iraqi commando coordinating a series of devastating attacks that have sowed chaos around the world. Offering Reece a pardon for himself and immunity for those who have protected him, the agency convinces a reluctant Reece to take on the job, setting him on a globe-trotting course that exposes a far-reaching conspiracy.

    The Invited, by Jennifer McMahon
    Helen and Nate Wetherell take the plunge and purchase 44 acres of land in rural Vermont on which to build their dream home. After they move into a trailer on the property and begin planning the project, however, they learn that a century before, a woman named Hattie Breckenridge was hanged as a witch on their property. Soon after, ominous things begin to happen. Pragmatic acience teacher Nate blames the locals who want them to stop building and go away, but as Helen investigates the history of the property, she becomes engrossed in Hattie’s legend—and convinced supernatural forces may be at work.

    The post April’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:00 pm on 2019/03/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , bnstorefront-thrillers, , ,   

    March’s Best New Thrillers 


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    The Cornwalls Are Gone, by James Patterson and Brendan DuBois
    Army intelligence officer Amy Cornwall is skilled at dealing with scenarios that would make most people blanch. But nothing in her professional career prepares her for the sense of dread she experiences when she comes home to find her husband and young daughter missing. Contacted by the kidnapper, she is told there is only one way to save her family: she must somehow secure the release of an unnamed captive. She has two days to accomplish her mission, and if she fails, her family will be killed. Amy has no choice but to go rogue, using her training, contacts, and desperation to find out who took her family and why.

    Cemetery Road (B&N Exclusive Edition), by Greg Iles
    Marshall McEwan escaped Bienville when he was young, heading off to Washington D.C. to become a journalist. When his father’s death and his family’s struggling newspaper force him to return home, he finds a transformed town flush with sketchy money and controlled by Max Matheson’s shadowy Bienville Poker Club, and discover’s Max’s old flame Jet has married the man’s son. After Max is implicated in the murder of his wife, he insists Jet serve as his defense lawyer. She secretly teams up with Marshall to investigate the whole web of lies, corruption, and murder, acting as the confidential informant to the journalist. Soon, the whole town seems to turn against Marshall, refusing to deal with the horrifying truth he’s threatening to reveal. The B&N exclusive edition includes a note from Greg Iles to his readers.

    Beautiful Bad, by Annie Ward
    In Meadowlark, Kansas, police officer Diane Varga responds to a 911 call made from the home of Ian and Maddie Wilson. She finds the house empty, the kitchen trashed and covered in blood, and no sign of the couple or their young son. As Varga investigates, flashbacks tell the story of how Ian and Maddie met, their often rocky relationship, Ian’s work as a security consultant in Nigeria, his struggles with PTSD, as well as Maddie’s own battle with anxiety and depression following a terrible accident. The story slowly builds to revelations about what actually went on in the house before and after an emergency call that was cut off, and how it all relates back to the very beginnings of the relationship.

    The Persian Gamble, by Joel C. Rosenberg
    Rosenberg’s sequel to The Kremlin Conspiracy spins a thrilling story that feels like a secret history unfolding in real time. In a bold move against NATO, Russia plans an invasion of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania while simultaneously signing a mutual defense pact with North Korea, which has only pretended to give up its nuclear program. Oleg Kraskin, son-in-law to Russian president Luganov, sees the potential end of the world in his father-in-law’s plot and passes information about his schemes to former secret service agent Marcus Ryker. They link up with the CIA’s Moscow station chief Jenny Morris in a desperate attempt to stop the mad president’s plans.

    The Perfect Alibi: A Novel, by Phillip Margolin
    Star athlete Blaine Hastings is convicted of rape despite his passionate, angry denials, largely due to the incontrovertible DNA evidence. While he’s in prison a second rape is committed, with DNA evidence pointing to the same culprit—which should be impossible. With a new lawyer, Blaine gets a fresh trial and is released on bail. His original lawyer is soon found dead. Fearing for her safety, the original rape victim hires young attorney Robin Lockwood, a skilled MMA fighter who is also handling another client charged with murder, despite clear evidence the act was committed in self-defense. Soon, Lockwood comes to suspect the two cases are connected, but she’ll have to act quickly to prove her theory before someone else winds up dead.

    My Lovely Wife, by Samantha Downing
    When the body of a young woman named Lindsay is discovered in an abandoned motel, it’s shocking—especially to the narrator of the book, who, along with his wife Millicent, had previously kidnapped her as part of a twisted attempt to inject sick thrills into their stale marriage. Millicent was supposed to kill Lindsay quickly and dispose of her body, but confesses she decided it would be better if the crime scene mimicked those of a notorious local serial killer. While the husband is intrigued by the possibility of hiding a murder spree behind another string of killings, the downside to this trick is the increased attention the crime receives.

    Dark Tribute: An Eve Duncan Novel, by Iris Johansen
    Johansen’s 24th Even Duncan novel kicks off with deceptive calm. Eve’s ward, violin prodigy Cara Delaney, leaves a celebrated performance and travels to Atlanta to meet her friend Jock in hopes of convincing him their intense bond should evolve into something romantic. At the hotel they’re both staying at, however, Cara’s whole world is turned upside-down when she’s abducted by a man bent on against Eve and her husband Joe Quinn. While Eve and Joe scramble to chase down clues, Cara must use all of her wits to survive.

    The Woman in the Dark, by Vanessa Savage
    After accidentally overdosing in the wake of her mother’s death, Sarah and her husband Tom decide to move their family into Tom’s childhood home. Sarah insists her brush with suicide was an accident, and that the change of scenery will be a wonderful way to leave grief behind. When they arrive, however, they find the house has been abandoned for 15 years after its last occupants were brutally murdered. They move into what the locals call the “Murder House” anyway. As Tom becomes obsessed with the crime, odd objects from the house’s past begin to turn up on their doorstep. When Sarah learns the murderer has just been released from prison—and that the sole survivor is in town too—she begins to doubt her husband’s stories of his own childhood in the house. As her struggle with depression worsens, Sarah grows desperate to protect her children from what increasingly seems like a supernatural evil within the residence. Or is it all in her head?

    The post March’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:00 pm on 2019/01/31 Permalink
    Tags: , , bnstorefront-thrillers, ,   

    February’s Best New Thrillers 


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    The Chef, by James Patterson and Max DiLallo
    James Patterson continues to innovate and push envelopes in terms of marketing and distribution. Case in point: his newest collaboration with DiLallo was first published on Facebook Messenger. Police detective and food truck chef Caleb Rooney serves New Orleans in both capacities, but as Mardi Gras approaches, he finds himself accused of murder. (It probably doesn’t help that his food truck is called the Killer Chef.) Shortly thereafter, Rooney discovers a plot to attack New Orleans being brewed up by home-grown terrorists. Racing against time, Rooney must clear his own name while preventing a slaughter in his beloved city as it gears up for Mardi Gras—the perfect tasty backdrop for a tense thriller.

    The Border, by Don Winslow
    Don Winslow concludes his bloody, operatic trilogy delving into the chaotic war on drugs with a suitably intense final act. After losing everything but his career in the war against drug kingpin Adán Barrera, Art Keller finds himself at the top of the DEA with Barrera defeated. But the war on drugs has come home in a flood of cheap heroin that’s killing Americans at a record pace. As Keller moves to block this deadly invasion, he finds himself fighting not Mexican drug cartels, but his own bosses in Washington. Politically motivated enemies are one thing, but Keller begins to suspect the unbelievable truth—the incoming administration is actually partnered with the very cartels he’s spent his life fighting.

    Never Tell, by Lisa Gardner
    Gardner’s 10th D.D. Warren thriller opens with Warren and other police breaking down the door to Evelyn Carter’s house, where they find the pregnant teacher standing over her dead husband, gun in hand. Warren remembers Evelyn from a case 16 years before, in which she accidentally shot and killed her own father, and decides it can’t be a coincidence. But when the killing gets some publicity, trusted informant Flora Dane contacts Warren to tell her that Evelyn’s husband was an associate of her kidnapper. As the investigation pivots into the possible connections between the two men, the complications pile up, as Gardner explores how well we can truly know anyone—even our closest loved ones.

    Mission Critical, by Mark Greaney
    The Gray Man is back for an eighth adventure from Greaney, with Court Gentry receiving a sudden summons to Langley. He boards a jet in Zurich, which lands in Luxembourg to pick up a hooded prisoner and head on to England, where the CIA intends to deliver the prisoner over to MI6. Upon arrival, however, the teams are attacked by gunman, who leave behind a bloody slaughter as they race off with the prisoner. As the Gray Man pursues in a powered glider, his sometimes-lover Zoya Zakharova of Russian Intelligence barely survive an attack that leaves her handlers dead. As Gentry and Zakharova work both sides of the mystery, it becomes clear that these violent attacks are connected—but the culprits’ careful planning didn’t take the Gray Man’s skills into account.

    The Silent Patient, by Alex Michaelides
    Michaelides delivers an assured, confident debut thriller. Six years ago, artist Alicia Berenson painted a psychologically dense work based on a Greek myth, then allegedly tied her husband Gabriel to a chair and shot him in the face. Alicia hasn’t spoken a word since, spending her time in a drugged daze at the Grove, a secure forensic facility in North London. Theo Faber is the wounded, gifted psychotherapist who convinces Alicia’s doctors to let him try to get her to speak. Theo’s work with the silent patient is interspersed with excerpts Alicia’s diary leading up to the day of Gabriel’s murder. As the clues about what truly happened begin to fall into place, Theo’s personal and professional worlds blur dangerously, leading to an explosive conclusion.

    The Hiding Place, by C. J. Tudor
    Joseph Thorne returns to his home town of Arnhill with alleged plans to teach at his old school and give back to his community, but the truth is, he’s really back in response to a mysterious email that claims to know what happened to Joe’s sister in her youth, and promises it is happening again. Joe moves into a cottage where a woman recently murdered her young son and committed suicide, and begins to plot revenge on behalf of his sister Annie, who disappeared decades before. Joe deals with ghosts, loan sharks, and unfriendly locals with cynical humor and grim determination, as Annie’s ultimate fate is slowly, painfully exhumed. Tudor’s followup to buzzy thriller The Chalk Man is every bit as tense and satisfying.

    The post February’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:00 pm on 2018/11/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , bnstorefront-thrillers, , new thrills,   

    November’s Best New Thrillers 


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    Time—and publishing schedules—wait for no one, so if you slacked off on your TBR pile in October, watch out, because November is bringing a bumper crop of new thrillers. This month’s picks of the litter are heavy on the returning faves as James Patterson, Lee Child, and Clive Cussler bring back some of their most popular characters, while Anthony Horowitz delivers a brand-new adventure for one of the most famous classic thriller characters of all time—and David Baldacci goes the other way, hitting the ground running with a brand-new character.

    Long Road to Mercy, by David Baldacci
    Baldacci takes a break from Amos Decker to introduce FBI Agent Atlee Pine, whose skill set makes her one of the FBI’s top criminal profilers, but who chooses to work in solitude as the lone agent assigned to the Shattered Rock, Arizona, resident agency. Pine is haunted by the kidnapping of her twin sister, Mercy, when they were six years old; the kidnapper sang out an old nursery rhyme as they chose which twin to abduct. Mercy was chosen, and Atlee never saw her sister again, and dedicated her life to saving others. When a mule is found dead in the Grand Canyon and its rider missing, Atlee is plunged into an investigation that would be beyond most agents—but not her. At least not until she’s abruptly ordered to close the case just as she’s figuring out the terrifying scope of what’s she’s chasing after…

    Target: Alex Cross, by James Patterson
    Patterson’s twenty-sixth Alex Cross book opens on a somber scene of mourning as hundreds of thousands of people gather in Washington, D.C., to mourn the president—among them Alex Cross, whose wife, Bree, has just become D.C.’s chief of detectives. When a sniper takes out a member of the president’s cabinet, it falls to Bree to solve the crime—and it’s clear her job is on the line. Cross begins to suspect the sniper is only getting started, and as usual he’s right—and the country is plunged into a violent crisis like nothing it’s ever seen before. Patterson raises the stakes beyond anything Cross has ever dealt with before—and that’s saying something.

    Past Tense, by Lee Child
    Jack Reacher returns in his twenty-third outing in fine form, as Child continues to get tremendous mileage from an older Reacher’s slow-burn journey into his own past. Faced with yet another fork in the road, Reacher chooses to walk into Laconia, New Hampshire, where his late father, Stan, was born. Meanwhile, a young couple driving from Canada stop at a mysteriously empty motel near Laconia when they have car trouble. Reacher, as usual, steps in to help the helpless and gets nothing but trouble for his efforts, while his efforts to learn about his father turn up a disturbing lack of information. As the two stories slowly work toward each other, Reacher discovers he might be more like his father than he suspected—and another batch of small-time goons discovers they’re no match whatsoever for Jack Reacher.

    Tom Clancy: Oath of Office, by Marc Cameron
    Cameron returns to the Jack Ryan universe for the second time with a complex story of betrayal and realpolitik that begins in Iran, where a Russian spy mourns his lover, Maryam, cut down by the Revolutionary Guard. This spurs Erik Dovzhenko to defect, traveling to Afghanistan to contact Maryam’s friend Ysabel Kashani. Ysabel brings in Jack Ryan, Jr., son of the President of the United States and member of antiterrorism unit the Campus. Ryan is in the area as part of a mission to track down two stolen nuclear weapons, and meets with Erik and Ysabel even as his father deals with an attack on an American embassy in Cameroon. The twisting story builds to an explosive conclusion in true Clancy style.

    You Don’t Own Me, by Mary Higgins Clark and Alafair Burke
    Clark and Burke deliver the fifth book in the Under Suspicion series, featuring television producer Laurie Morgan, whose penchant for getting into trouble is just as strong as ever. Laurie is busy planning her wedding to former host Alex Buckley (who is about to be confirmed as a federal judge) when she’s contacted by the parents of a physician famously gunned down in his own driveway five years before; they’re in a bitter custody battle with his wife, and believe she was the killer. As Laurie takes on the story she finds, as usual, more layers to it than meet the eye—but as she works she’s being followed by a mysterious man who admires her from afar and thinks she might not be missed when she’s gone, pushing the tension to the breaking point.

    Sea of Greed, by Clive Cussler and Graham Brown
    The sixteenth NUMA Files novel depicts a world on the verge of chaos as oil supplies dry up and stock markets drop. When a massive explosion in the Gulf of Mexico destroys three crucial oil rigs, the President of the United States is concerned enough to ask Kurt Austin and the NUMA Special Projects Team to investigate. Their attention is drawn to a maverick billionaire who sees her alternative energy company as the future—and who might be willing to take drastic measures to get to that future sooner rather than later. The crew of the NUMA finds evidence that an oil-eating bacteria thought lost fifty years before has been deployed in the Gulf, and now threatens to plunge the world into chaos if Austin and his team can’t get to the bottom of the mystery in time.

    Forever and a Day, by Anthony Horowitz
    Crafting an origin story for no less of a pop culture icon than James Bond is a daunting task, but Horowitz is in familiar waters after 2015’s Trigger Mortis, and does an expert job. The story kicks off with the death of the prior 007, found floating in the water off of Marseilles. M calls up Bond, newly attached to the Double-O section, and assigns him to investigate the agent’s death. Bond goes toe-to-toe with the Corsican mob and a classic Bond villain in the immensely obese and incredibly dangerous crime boss Jean-Paul Scipio. Horowitz seeds the story with plenty of Bond Easter eggs for longtime fans while crafting a tense, action-heavy story that satisfies simply as a modern-day spy thriller that’s gritty, violent, and morally complex.

    The post November’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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