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  • BN Editors 2:00 pm on 2018/09/04 Permalink
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    September’s Best New Fiction 

    As summer bids us farewell and vacation time winds down, what could be better than curling up with a transportive book? Whether you’re in the mood for 1940s Britain, 1970s Argentina, 1990s Paris, or current-day America with all its rapid-fire twists and turns, September’s best new novels will enthrall you. Fascinating love stories, daring tales of espionage, and a new, female-driven perspective of Homer’s Iliad await.

    Hippie, by Paulo Coelho (translated by M.B. Becker)
    Anti-authoritarian protestors of 2018 will enjoy this look at a previous generation of freedom seekers and demonstrators. Brazilian author Coelho—whose groundbreaking work The Alchemist celebrated its 30th anniversary this year—draws from his real-life experiences to present an authentic journey of self-discovery set in South America and Europe in the early 1970s. From Peru, Chile, and Argentina through Amsterdam and Kathmandu, young Paulo, an aspiring writer, and his Dutch lover Karla travel via the Magic Bus, learning about themselves and their fellow passengers in what promises to be an immersive examination of original hippie culture.

    Sea Prayer, by Khaled Hosseini
    This timely, heartfelt illustrated novel, the proceeds of which will go to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), depicts the hopes and fears of a father for his young son. As the duo waits for the boat that will take them on a harrowing escape from war-torn Syria, the father composes a letter to his sleeping child, detailing the lives they once lived in their home village of Homs. Intended for all ages, it’s a good choice for parents who want to explain the refugee crisis to their kids.

    Transcription, by Kate Atkinson
    Historical spy fiction at its finest, Transcription revolves around the mysterious choices made by Juliet, a teenager recruited by MI5 in 1940. Tasked with transcribing the clandestine meetings between a double agent and British Nazi sympathizers, Juliet believes her work is finished once the war ends. But ten years later her past returns, demanding answers about the role she really played serving justice to turncoats. Fans of Atkinson’s Life After Life  (i.e., everyone) will devour this suspenseful story.

    Katerina, by James Frey
    Toggling between Paris in the early ’90s and modern-day L.A., this love story/addiction parable seems to parallel some of the more controversial aspects of Frey’s real life. As a young American living in France, eager to write books that matter, Jay scrounges and scrimps and deals drugs alongside his sexy model muse. Twenty-five years later, now a famous author, he receives a message—possibly from said ex—that throws his world off-kilter. Will revisiting their passionate struggles ignite Jay’s creativity?

    Labyrinth of the Spirits, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    The fourth and final installment of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series (which began with The Shadow of the Wind) centers on Alicia Gris, orphaned by the Spanish Civil War as a child. Now nearly thirty, and working for Madrid’s secret police, she’s entrusted with locating a government official who seems to have vanished. Solving the mystery brings her into contact with friends of her parents and proves Franco’s regime was even more corrupt than previously understood. As with the earlier books in the tetralogy, Zafon continues to lavish love (and plot points) on books, those who love them, those who write them, and those who sell them. A literary feast. 

    Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart
    Combining his trademark slapstick wit with a Greyhound bus road trip through the south and southwest, Shteyngart spins a tale set in right-this-second America, highlighting its surreal beauty and horror. Readers may not expect to root for a timepiece-obsessed hedge fund manager who abandons his American Indian wife and their autistic son for greener pastures, but watching Barry Cohen flail through his decisions in an attempt to outlast and outrun them proves satirical humor may be the best medicine in a society gone mad.

    The Silence of the Girls, by Pat Barker
    Previous Iliad / Odyssey retellings include Ransom, by David Malouf; The Song of Achilles, by Madeline Miller; and, of course Ulysses, by James Joyce. What makes Silence unique is that it focuses on the female prisoners held in Greece during the last days of the Trojan War. Briseis, the former queen of Lyrnessus, becomes Achilles’s concubine after he slaughters her family and lays waste to her city, but her struggles don’t end there; soon, Agamemnon demands that Achilles hand Briseis over to him, which changes the entire direction of the war. Barker is a master of wartime narratives, having won the Booker Prize for The Ghost Road, set during World War I.

    The post September’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:30 pm on 2018/08/28 Permalink
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    September’s Best Thrillers 

    Juror #3, by James Patterson and Nancy Allen
    Paterson, perhaps the world’s most successful and prolific thriller writer, teams up with Allen, a former attorney and seasoned writer to tell the story of Ruby Bozarth. Ruby is new to the Mississippi bar and the town of Rosedale, but she’s barely got time to find her bearings when she’s assigned to a sensational case. A rich girl is dead and a college football star stands accused, and the prosecutor and judge think Ruby’s inexperience will let them ram through a quick conviction. Ruby’s determined to prove them wrong, and with a little help from a well-armed fellow attorney and a short order cook with a lot of secrets she mounts a defense. But Ruby begins to suspect the biggest obstacle to justice might just be the jurors on the case, who have plenty of secrets of their own.

    Shadow Tyrants, by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
    Cussler teams up with engineer and author Morrison again for the 13th Oregon Files adventure, which finds a mysterious group known as the Nine Unknown seeking to use ancient technology and knowledge to take control of the world for its own good. One member of the Nine, Romir Malik, dissents, however, convinced that the project—code-named Colossus—will destroy humanity instead. It’s once again up to The Corporation and the crew of the Oregon to put the deceptively-weathered high-tech ship on the front lines in order to save the world, as Malik’s solution is to use a network of killer satellites to destroy Colossus, a cure that might be just as bad as the disease.

    Lies, by T.M. Logan
    Logan’s debut begins with an innocent impulse. Joe Lynch and his son William are driving in North London when William sees his mother’s car and insists they surprise her. Joe follows Melissa to a hotel, where he watches her argue with her best friend’s husband, the wealthy Ben Delaney. Before he can confront her, Melissa drives off, so Joe confronts Ben instead, getting into a fight that ends with his phone missing and Ben unconscious. Joe leaves; when he comes back for his phone everything is gone. Melissa denies an affair, but when Ben is supposedly murdered her lie is revealed, and Joe finds himself framed for a murder he knows is impossible—because he knows Ben is alive. Behind the mystery is the real question: just how long has Melissa been lying—and why?

    Cross Her Heart, by Sarah Pinborough
    In Pinborough’s tense new book, Lisa is a tightly-wound overprotective mother. Her daughter Ava is a champion athlete who’s tired of being protected, and sneaking around with her first boyfriend behind Lisa’s back and communicating with a mysterious man online. Marilyn is Lisa’s bestie pushing her to ‛get back out there.’ But Lisa has secrets that have taught her to be careful, and when she drops her guard and lets her photo be taken when Ava is hailed a hero in the press, those secrets come crashing down on her, threatening her safety and her relationship with her daughter. She and Marilyn have to push through their own problems and join forces in order to save Ava from the past which has come back in terrifying force.

    The Labyrinth of the Spirits, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    Bestselling Zafón offers up the fourth and final entry in his Cemetery of Forgotten Books series, catching up with the characters from the first three as they make their way under the repressive rule of Francisco Franco from the late 1930s to the 1970s. But the focus is on Alicia Gris, who survives a bombing as a little girl and carries the scars into adulthood as she works for the secret police as an investigator. Her final case involves the disappearance of the country’s Minister of Culture, Mauricio Valls. A rare book is her first clue in an investigation that begins to reveal the depth of cruelty and violence that Franco’s regime inflicted on the country—a truth so dangerous to the powers that be that Alicia’s soon has to make a choice: risk her life by pursuing the truth, or allow herself to be intimidated into silence.

    When the Lights Go Out, by Mary Kubica
    Jessie Sloane is 17 when her mother, Eden, passes away. Grieving and suffering from insomnia, Jessie decides to sell the house and move on to community college. But she discovers that 17 years ago someone filed a death certificate in her name, and now she has no official identity. As Jessie’s sleepless nights melt into a timeless nightmare, Eden’s heartbreaking story comes to the forefront. Two decades before, she and Aaron were in love and desperately wanted children, but couldn’t conceive. Eden’s obsession with having a child slowly transforms into a frightening compulsion, driving Aaron away. Separated by decades, a mother and a daughter both go down dark paths—and reach shocking conclusions.

    Leave No Trace, by Mindy Mejia
    Two fascinating characters collide in Mejia’s newest thriller. Maya Stark is a young speech therapist pushed by her former psychiatrist to take on a challenging case she doesn’t feel ready for. Lucas Blackthorn is a violent, mute man who’d been presumed dead for years after his father took him into the vast wilderness of Boundary Waters—until he was arrested after a botched robbery. Now Lucas wants nothing more than to escape back to the wilderness and tend to his father, and Maya finds herself being drawn to his perspective so strongly she makes decisions that are more than just ethically dubious—they might be extremely dangerous as well. As her secrets are revealed, Maya becomes increasingly determined to help Lucas no matter the cost.

    The Ancient Nine, by Ian K. Smith
    Smith’s followup to his debut, The Blackbird Papers, is a behind-the-scenes glimpse at Harvard’s tony secret clubs that drips with tension and bulges with secrets. In 1988, Spenser Collins is a champion African-American swimmer who gets a prestigious invitation to join Harvard’s Delphic Club. Intrigued by the idea of connecting with the elite, he begins to investigate the club’s history, discovering not only a mysterious disappearance by a student named Erasmus Abbott who broke into the club in 1927, never to be seen again, but also the existence of a secret club-within-the club known as the Ancient Nine. As Collins digs deeper he learns more and more about this secretive and powerful group—and about their dangerous secret agenda.

    Nomad, by James Swallow
    In Swallow’s newest surefire bestseller, Marc Dane is an MI6 field agent who’s very happy working the computers, far from the grisly action. When his entire team is wiped out and he’s framed for their deaths, he has little choice but to head directly into danger. Labeled a traitor, Dane makes contact with the Rubicon Group and their agent Lucy Keyes, ex-U.S. Army and exactly the sort of skilled agent Dane needs to help him clear his name. Their investigation reveals a historic terrorist plot that could result in the worst attack ever known—and none of the world’s intelligence agencies are looking at the right information to stop it. Dane and Keyes will have to put their own needs aside and risk everything to save the world.

    The post September’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 2:00 pm on 2018/08/01 Permalink
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    August’s Best New Fiction 

    This month’s best new work includes the second book of the Half-Drowned King Viking fantasy trilogy, a portrait of a Midwest town in decline, a debut roman à clef by an Iraq veteran currently imprisoned for bank robbery, and a historical about the Black Plague. And for lighter, contemporary reads, enjoy a sorority-set drama, a romance in Paris gone wrong, and an octogenarian-led cozy mystery. 

    The Masterpiece, by Fiona Davis
    In 1928, Clara Darden struggles against the restraints of the era as the lone female teacher at New York City’s Grand Central School of Art, housed in the majestic terminal of the same name. After the Great Depression hits, her career in illustration disappears, as does Clara. Fast-forward to the 1970s, when divorcée Virginia Clay takes a job at Grand Central, intrigued by the abandoned art studio there, as well as a painting she discovers—a painting that may shed light on Clara’s mysterious fate fifty years prior.

    Rush, by Lisa Patton
    Yankee Doodle Dixie author Patton has written another entertaining, Southern-set contemporary, this time pulling back the curtain on the secret lives of sorority sisters at Ole Miss. Cali Watkins hopes to earn a place with the elite Alpha Delta girls, but lacks the right pedigree and fears a long-buried family secret will tank her chances. The Advisory Board members have more power than sense, but the girls rise up against them when a beloved house staff member at Alpha Delta Beta is denied a promotion.

    Ohio, by Stephen Markley
    A searing debut about one evening in the summer of 2013, in which four ex-classmates who came of age during 9/11 reunite in New Canaan, Ohio, a town marked and marred by decline. From the opioid crises to the Great Recession to the never-ending wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, these Midwesterners have been affected by it all, and each seek closure from their painful pasts in this beautiful, sad, contemplative study of a rust belt town that has been hollowed out.

    The Sea Queen, by Linnea Hartsuyker
    Last summer kicked off the Half-Drowned King trilogy, a 9th-century Viking fantasy based on historical events and overflowing with political machinations and violent battles. In the new installment, six years have passed for minor king Ragnvald and his sister Svanhild, the titular Sea Queen. Their separation has evolved into opposition: While Ragnvald dedicates his life to the unification of Norway under Harald’s command, Svanhild marries the leader of the resistance and displays remarkable strength as a maritime warrior in her own right. 

    The Last Hours, by Minette Walters
    While her husband is away, a woman educated by nuns in 1348 England uses her smarts and intuition to hold the line against the Black Death when it arrives in the town of Develish. Having quarantined herself, her cruel teenage daughter, and her serfs in her moat-surrounded house, Lady Anne denies her own husband entry, correctly fearing he has brought the plague home with him. Her decision does not go over well with her progeny, Lady Eleanor, who harbors a sadistic streak.

    Three Things About Elsie, by Joanna Cannon
    A lifelong friendship between two women forms the heart of this mystery set in an assisted living facility. Our firmly independent octogenarian narrator, Florence, provides sharp commentary but finds it difficult to communicate with others, fearful her memory is failing. With a new arrival, who strongly resembles a frightening figure from Florence’s past, Florence dedicates herself to uncovering the hows and whys of the man’s reappearance. Shifting perceptions provide a bittersweet, suspenseful, and emotionally cathartic reading experience. 

    If You Leave Me, by Crystal Hana Kim
    Against the backdrop of the Korean War and its aftermath, a young woman desperate to provide for her invalid younger brother and widowed mother must choose between two cousins who love her. One is her childhood sweetheart, while the other has the financial stability necessary to save her family. A memorable, heartwrenching debut with multiple POVs that will appeal to fans of Samuel Park’s This Burns My Heart.

    Bad Man, by Dathan Auerbach
    Auerbach got his start terrifying Redditors on their NoSleep short story forum, and it’s easy to see why he proved so popular there. His second full-length novel tells the harrowing story of a young man from North Florida drowning in guilt over the role he played in his three-year-old brother’s disappearance. Five years later, now twenty, Ben decides to take a job stocking groceries at the very store where little Eric vanished. Will he find answers in this oddly creepy, disconcerting milieu, even when the local authorities could not? 

    Cherry, by Nico Walker
    PTSD, heroin addiction, bank robbing, and young-love-turned-bleak-survival are the themes of this breakneck debut by an author well-versed in all four topics. As a medic in Iraq, and a veteran of 250 combat missions, Walker returned home to find his memories incapacitating him; in a parallel to combat, the adrenaline rush he got while committing crimes was the only time he felt calm. A blisteringly authentic and timely work is the result.

    Goodbye Paris, by Anstey Harris
    When her relationship with David (who has a wife and family) comes to a difficult and public end in Paris, thirtysomething Grace Atherton is left to pick up the pieces back home in Kent, where she runs a shop making violins and cellos. Her own burgeoning career in music was derailed decades ago, and truly moving on from her broken relationship may require a hard look at the painful secrets she has been keeping from that time. Luckily, she’ll have help from people in her community, including a young shop clerk and a wise, older customer.

    The post August’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 2:00 pm on 2018/07/01 Permalink
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    July’s Best New Fiction 

    Anglophiles, take note: this month is all about historical fiction, several of which take place in Merry Old England. Travel to London during World Wars I and II, or to the early 1800s for a Pride & Prejudice retelling that ushers Mary Bennet into the spotlight. Then cross the Atlantic for a Virginia-set Southern Gothic and a New York-to-LA road trip, or board a fast boat to China for a Shanghai family drama. 

    Dear Mrs. Bird, by AJ Pearce
    Taking the London Blitz as its backdrop, this historical debut focuses on female friendships as well as the possibility of finding comfort in the empathy of strangers. When upbeat, 20something Emmeline Lake answers an ad for a job at Women’s Friend magazine, she’s hoping it will launch her career as a journalist. Instead, she finds herself assisting Mrs. Bird, the magazine’s judgmental advice columnist. Mrs. Bird won’t even consider answering letters about “unpleasant” topics (doesn’t she notice there’s a war on?). Emmy decides to write back for her, offering kindness and compassion to those whose struggles have been consigned to the rubbish heap.

    The Dying of the Light, by Robert Goolrick
    Fans of Southern Gothic will lose their minds for this dramatically rich story about Diana Cooke, the most beautiful teen debutante of the 1919 season, who marries a cruel man in order to save her family’s derelict Virginia mansion. Known as Saratoga, the estate has been in the Cooke family for a century and represents much more than the lavish parties it once hosted. However, the real trouble starts when the widowed Diana’s cherished son returns home from college with his roommate in tow.

    Saving Beck, by Courtney Cole
    Though known for her psychologically gripping, bestselling romance books, Cole’s new novel takes her writing in a new direction, one informed by her own life. Using dual perspectives, Saving Beck tells the story of widowed Natalie and her eldest child, grieving, guilt-ridden Beck, who blames himself for the car crash that killed his father. When Beck’s family life falls apart, burdening him with new responsibilities, he turns to heroin for relief. This appears to be a thoughtful, extraordinarily honest look at addiction.

    The Lido, by Libby Page
    Octogenarian Rosemary has resided in Brixton, London, since birth. Twentysomething Kate is a nervous newcomer to town who’s accepted an unglamorous reporting job at the local paper. The two form an unexpected bond of friendship while attempting to save the lido, the beloved public swimming pool that’s been a constant to Rosemary her entire life, from her WWII childhood to her years of marriage. Will Rosemary’s memories of what makes the pool so important be enough to keep it open? Can Kate cast off her anxiety and self-doubt and lead the charge on Rosemary’s behalf?

    Ghosted, by Rosie Walsh
    A brief, intense, and life-changing romance between middle-aged Sarah and Eddie ends in heartache and confusion when Eddie’s promised phone call after some time apart never comes. Sarah’s friends try to convince her she’s been ghosted, but Sarah can’t bear the idea of never seeing or hearing from Eddie again. She’s convinced something has gone terribly wrong, and her instincts are correct—leading her to uncover secrets she never saw coming.

    America For Beginners, by Leah Franqui
    Pival Sengupta, a recently widowed Indian woman, travels to the U.S. for the first time via a madcap touring company, in hopes of locating her estranged son, Rahi. The road trip from New York to LA allows Pival to learn about Rahi through his adoptive homeland. Her companions include a tour guide who’s only been in America for a year, and a would-be actress. The team members find solace in each other’s journeys and viewpoints. 

    Mary B: An untold story of Pride and Prejudice, by Katherine J. Chen
    Middle child Mary Bennet, an avid reader and writer, is voted least likely to marry by her family, but that doesn’t mean she’s going to sit on the sidelines of life. In fact, in this novel of behind the scenes and offscreen moments surrounding the events of P&P, Mary reveals herself to be observant and charming, with a quiet wit. Pair it with Curtis Sittenfeld’s 2017 novel, Eligible, for the best in old school and contemporary Austen retellings.

    What We Were Promised, by Lucy Tan
    Desperate housewife and mother Lina Zhen has trouble acclimating to her new life of leisure in modern-day Shanghai, but her husband Wei’s job provides everything the family could want. Still, Lina is restless and distracted, particularly when a reunion with her true love—Wei’s brother, Qiang—looms on the horizon after a twenty-year absence. The only person who senses the hidden tumult about to erupt is Sunny, the Zhens’ long-term housekeeper, who is privy to more than a few secrets.

    Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras
    A historical coming of age novel set in Bogotá, Colombia, during the worst years of Pablo Escobar’s narcoterrorism, Fruit’s narration comes from the POV of two girls: seven-year-old Chula and thirteen-year-old Petrona, the family maid whose own family is being destroyed by the drug war. Petrona is determined to turn things around for her loved ones, but when she puts her trust in the wrong boy, she’s not the only one who’ll pay the price.

    Eagle Crane, by Suzanne Rindell
    Harry (who is Japanese American) and Louis (who is white) were neighbors and best pals during the Depression and their barnstorming days as stunt pilots in California, but the rivalry between their respective families, as well as a romantic interest in the same woman, caused problems for the two men. Jumping ahead a few years, it appears Harry and his father have been murdered in a plane crash after escaping from an internment camp, but the FBI is convinced the case is not as cut-and-dry as it appears.

    The post July’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 6:00 pm on 2018/06/30 Permalink
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    July’s Best New Thrillers 

    The Other Woman, by Daniel Silva
    Silva’s 18th entry in the Gabriel Allon series finds the art restorer and Israel’s most effective spy drawn back into the struggle against Russia’s to tip the balance of world power in their favor. When one of Allon’s best assets inside Russian intelligence is assassinated while trying to defect, he investigates—and is soon on the trail of one of the biggest and best-kept secrets of the last few decades: there is a mole inside the highest corridors of power in the west—someone who has bided their time and now stands at the summit of power. Allon will have to risk everything and give all in order to stop the unthinkable.

    Spymaster, by Brad Thor
    The 17th Scot Harvath book finds the skilled agent finally feeling his age—though he’s still the most dangerous and effective employee at private security and espionage endeavor The Carlton Group. Across Europe, someone is assassinating diplomats, and Harvath is ordered to find out who—and why. When it’s revealed to be part of a plot by Russia to leverage the NATO alliance to draw the United States into a war, Harvath is tasked with stopping the Russian plan, and he goes on the offensive, identifying and hunting down the assassins themselves. Meanwhile, the founder of the Carlton Group battles a declining mental state that means the secrets of his long career are at risk—and the new head, former CIA chief Lydia Ryan, must scramble to protect those secrets—as well as her agents in the field.

    Give Me Your Hand, by Megan Abbott
    As a teenager, Kit Owens isn’t particularly ambitious—until she meets Diane Fleming, a troubled girl with a troubled past who pushes herself to perfection in everything. Kit finds herself being pushed along with her as they both pursue an elite science scholarship, until one night Diane shares a secret with Kit—and Kit, horrified, turns her back on Diane. A decade later, Kit is working in a prestigious lab under a famous scientist and pursuing a coveted spot on the male-dominated team, and she is shocked to find herself suddenly competing against Diane. Kit struggles to keep the past in the past as she realizes her connection to Diane, so long buried, is as powerful as ever—and Diane’s secret, which she worked so hard to forget, is as terrible as ever.

    Double Blind, by Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen
    The Johansens’ sixth Kendra Michaels novel finds the FBI agent drawn into a murder investigation when the victim, paralegal Elena Meyer, is found holding an envelope addressed to Kendra. Kendra doesn’t know Elena, and doesn’t recognize anyone on the video of a wedding reception contained on a memory stick in the envelope. She enlists the help of freelance investigator Adam Lynch—but the video suddenly disappears. As Adam and Kendra struggle with their attraction to one another, Kendra finds herself diving into a massive conspiracy—and tallying a rising body count.

    She Was the Quiet One, by Michele Campbell
    When their mother passes away, twins Rose and Bel are sent to Odell Academy, an elite boarding school. Rose is thrilled and immediately excels. but Bel falls in with a bad crowd. Both sisters forge unusually strong bonds with a married couple, Sarah and Heath, who act as both faculty advisors and dorm parents. When Bel gives in to peer pressure and hazes Rose, the bond between siblings is strained to the breaking point. Rose turns to Sarah and Bel turns to Heath, whose motives may be less than honorable. As the sisters’ relationship sours into violence, a deep and disturbing mystery arises, told through overlapping points of view and twisting timelines.

    Caged, by Ellison Cooper
    Sayer Altair, a talented special agent for the FBI, studies the patterns of serial killers in order to forget the tragedies that trail in her wake—parents dead in a horrific car crash, fiancé killed while working a mysterious case for the Bureau. She is forced to emerge from her research when she’s assigned to the case of Gwen Van Hurst, daughter of a senator who went missing a year before, who has been found dead in a cage in the basement of a booby-trapped house in Washington, D.C. Sayer learns that another victim may still be alive in a cage somewhere, kicking off a frantic race against time.

    Baby Teeth, by Zoje Stage
    Stage’s debut tells the story of fragile Suzette, battling with her distant, cold mother and the crippling effects of Crohn’s disease. Despite the physical risks, she and her husband Alex have a child. Determined to be a better mother than her own, Suzette tries her best, but Hanna is a difficult child. As the story opens, Hanna is seven years old and Suzette is home-schooling her because Hanna—who has yet to speak a word despite knowing how to read and write—refuses to behave. The only person for whom Hanna seems to have any affection is her father, and she views Suzette as a barrier between her and the total devotion of her dad. As Hanna’s behavior becomes more violent and unhinged, Alex doesn’t see the danger—but Suzette begins to fear for her life.

    Bound for Gold, by William Martin
    Rare-book dealer Peter Fallon returns along with his girlfriend Evangeline Carrington. At Peter’s son’s behest, the pair head out to California in search of the stolen journal of James Spencer of the Sagamore Mining Company, who searched for a legendary “river of gold.” Spencer’s story is one of violence and greed, racism and capitalism—in short, the story of America. And it’s a story that may not be quite over; as Peter and Evangeline hunt for the stolen book and stumble into a plot that threatens their lives.

    Four Dominions, by Eric Van Lustbader
    The third entry in Lustbader’s Testament series opens with Emma Shaw, artifacts expert, studying the recently acquired Testament of Lucifer onboard a private plane. Turbulence knocks lemon juice onto the parchment, revealing hidden writings that Emma reads before she realizes the danger—and finds herself possessed by the demon Beleth, who serves Lucifer’s plan to finally free Heaven itself from God’s tyranny. Beleth sets Emma to turning her brother, academic Bravo Shaw, towards evil as the demons plot their final victory.

    All These Beautiful Strangers, by Elizabeth Klehfoth
    Ten years ago, Charlie Fairchild’s mother Grace was seen on bank security cameras cleaning out the family’s safe deposit boxes—and never seen again. Now 17, Charlie is haunted by her mother’s disappearance, wondering if she truly abandoned her family, or if there is another explanation. Attending an exclusive boarding school, Charlie is pushed by the secret society she’s pledging to dig into her family’s secrets—and what she finds makes her head reel. forcing her to consider the possibility she never knew either of her parents at all.

    The post July’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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