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  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2019/05/01 Permalink
    Tags: armando lucase correa, ask again yes, blessing in disguise, , bnstorefront-fiction, , , , , , , , light from other stars, liv constantine, mary beth keane, , queen bee, resistance women, , sarah blake, the daughter's tale, the guest book, the last time i saw you, ,   

    May’s Best New Fiction 


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    This month kicks off summer beach read season and we couldn’t be more delighted by the historical fiction and sweeping family sagas in our TBR pile. Whether you’re in the mood for a lowcountry tale of two sisters intrigued by the same widow, a murder mystery in high society Baltimore, or tales of resistance in Nazi Germany, there’s plenty to keep you company while the waves crash against the shore.

    The Guest Book, by Sarah Blake
    Following the success of The Postmistress, Sarah Blake is back with a gripping new historical novel that depicts three generations of a privileged American family. The Miltons embody the American dream in a manner not seen since the Gettys or Vanderbilts. In the 1930s, they purchased Crockett Island off the coast of Maine as a summertime getaway. Each generation since has enjoyed the secluded, gorgeous setting, but eventually the family wealth dries up and the fate of the homestead rests in the hands of three cousins, each with separate agendas. The island’s origin is steeped in misery—but what, if anything, will the newest generation do to mitigate the sins of the past?

    Queen Bee, by Dorothea Benton Frank
    Fans of Frank will be delighted to re-visit Sullivan’s Island for the author’s twentieth tale, set as always in lowcountry South Carolina. Sibling rivalry rears its head when beekeeper / librarian Holly’s newly separated sister, Leslie, sweeps back into town to wreak havoc. Leslie has set her sights on Holly’s widowed neighbor, Archie, father of two. Problem is, he’s the same man whose young kids Holly has come to view as a key component of her happiness and purpose. Add the sisters’ hypochondriac mother to the mix and you’ve got a warm family saga and pitch-perfect beach read.

    Blessing in Disguise, by Danielle Steel
    If you loved the Mamma Mia films, you’ll devour Steel’s latest in a single weekend. Isabelle McAvoy has loved, lost, and lived to fight another day as the single mother of three daughters. Each daughter has a different father, and the relationships that produced them are as disparate as the circumstances that brought them into Isabelle’s life. From true love matches to ill-advised unions, Isabelle has learned a lot along the way—but it turns out her journey, and that of her daughters, is far from over.

    The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine
    With her thrilling debut, The Last Mrs. Parrish (picked for Reese Witherspoon’s book club), Constantine proved her skill at creating memorably devious characters. Her new novel, a twisty murder mystery set among Baltimore high society, ratchets up the tension even more. On the surface, Doctor Kate English is living an enviable life. She appears to balance a perfect family, inherited wealth, and a fulfilling career. All that changes when her mother is viciously killed and the only woman Kate trusts to solve the crime is her prickly, estranged former friend, Blaire, a woman not known for treading lightly.

    Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane
    Keane’s new book is tender and wise, literary fiction of the highest caliber, and readers will immediately feel pulled in to the story of two families whose lives are forever entwined. As next-door neighbors in a New York suburb, and colleagues at the police department, Francis Gleeson and Brian Stanhope first met in the 1970s. The two men were never exactly friends, but in the ensuing years, their children Peter and Kate grow up together as close as can be. When a shocking act tears the neighbors apart, can either family find a way back from the depths of trauma? Will Peter and Kate’s now-forbidden relationship overcome their parents’ misgivings? Demand this one for your book club: they’ll thank you for it!

    Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini
    This compelling World War II historical is firmly in Chiaverini’s wheelhouse, based on real people and filled with excitement. It’s the early 1930s and Mildred Fish Harnack from Wisconsin is enjoying her new life in Berlin. Recently reunited with her German husband, Arvid, and pursuing a doctorate in American Lit, she finds the cosmopolitan city invigorating and stimulating. When the political tide takes a horrifying turn, she and three other women—Martha Dodd (the US ambassador’s daughter); Greta Lorke (an aspiring playwright); and Sara Weitz (a student)—vow to resist Hitler’s regime, putting their lives and the lives of their loved ones on the line.

    The Daughter’s Tale, by Armando Lucas Correa
    A dual-timeline story presented with realistic and harrowing detail, Tale depicts the escape by Amanda Sternberg from Germany when her husband is killed in a prison camp in 1939. Though Amanda sends her eldest daughter to Cuba to live with an uncle, she keeps her youngest daughter, Lina, by her side to face an uncertain future in France. Present-day Lina, now called Elise Duval and living in the U.S., is stunned to discover a series of letters written by her mother that shed light on the past, and the choices Amanda was once forced to make.

    The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna, by Juliet Grames
    This moving debut set in Connecticut and Calabria, Italy, finds the immigrant Fortuna sisters, Stella and Tina, struggling to grow up under the thumb of a domineering father. Did I mention Stella has a penchant for near-death experiences and an independent streak a mile wide? She’ll also do anything to keep her younger sister Tina safe from pain or hardship, which makes their eventual estrangement all the more mysterious. This has the potential to be an excellent read-alike for Kate Atkinson’s Life After Lifewhile also being wholly original.

    Light From Other Stars, by Erika Swyler
    A perfect book for fans of Interstellar, this sci-fi drama, grounded in realism and the bonds of family, follows 12-year-old Nedda and her quest to become an astronaut. Nedda’s father, a former physicist for NASA, is driven to prolong Nedda’s childhood by slowing it down via entropy. As a result, he subsumes the entire town of Easter, Florida, into a sinkhole in time. Yet years later, Nedda finds herself aboard a vessel in space, and it may be Nedda’s mother and grandmother who are responsible for Nedda’s success. This looks to be a mesmerizing and beautiful coming of age story about dreams fulfilled and paths not taken.

    How Not to Die Alone, by Richard Roper
    Years ago, Andrew made a split-second decision to pretend he was a family man in order to secure a job. His seemingly benign lie has come back to haunt him when a new employee and mentee, Peggy, enters his life and his heart. Like the rest of Andrew’s colleagues, Peggy assumes Andrew is married with two daughters, so how can he come clean after all this time? Each moment of his career feels like a glimpse into his own future; as an administrator in the U.K.’s Death Council, Andrew is responsible for going through the belongings of people who have died alone. If Andrew doesn’t make some changes, he may very well share their fate. Alone promises to be a charming and poignant read.

    The post May’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 5:00 pm on 2019/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: , bnstorefront-fiction, , cari mora, , ,   

    May’s Best New Thrillers 


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    Our list of the best thrillers out this month is stacked with star authors like Thomas Harris, the father of Hannibal Lecter, who delivers an entirely new story of greed and obsession; Clive Cussler, who returns with another Fargo Adventures story; and Jeffery Deaver, who is launching a taut new series. May just got a lot more exciting.

    Cari Mora, by Thomas Harris
    The author of The Silence of the Lambs delivers his first standalone novel in four decades, a tense thrilling with a most unexpectedly dangerous protagonist. It’s the story of Cari Mora, an tenuously legal immigrant working in Miami as the caretaker of a luxurious beach house, having fled violence and brutality in her home country. What Cari doesn’t know is that her life in the U.S. will be no safer: a drug cartel has buried $25 million under the house, and a group of ruthless, driven men seek to claim it. The worst of them, a sadistic fiend named Hans-Peter Schneider, is willing to do whatever it takes to get to the money, but he finds himself distracted with the beautiful Cari, and decides to claim her as part of the fortune. But Schneider soon discovers that Cari has learned how to survive the hard way, and has the skills—and the desperate drive to survive—to match his own perverse desires.

    The Oracle, by Clive Cussler and Robin Burcell
    Cussler and Burcell’s treasure hunting couple Sam and Remi Fargo have never let a little thing like the threat of a supernatural curse prevent them from tracking down the treasures of the ancient world, and they aren’t about to start now. In the 6th century, a Vandal kingdom in Africa collapsed when a bundle of sacred scrolls were stolen and a curse was laid upon the king. The scrolls were never found, and the Fargos are determined to recover them. Delaying their quest is the theft of the humanitarian supplies being delivered by their charity, which forces them to travel to Africa to ensure replacements get to their intended destination. But the couple themselves are next assailed by thieves, and Remi is taken hostage. As Sam desperately searches for her, he discovers an apparent connection between the kidnapping and the ancient scrolls. The Fargos will be tested to their limits and beyond as they struggle to survive their 11th adventure..

    The Night Window, by Dean Koontz
    Five books into Koontz’s fast-paced techno-thriller series, Jane Hawk’s struggle against the Techno Arcadians—a shadowy cabal using secret nanotech implants to control minds and souls—is at its most desperate point. Having hidden her son Travis with allies, she teams up with former FBI agent Vikram Rangnekar and adopts a new identity in order to continue the fight. Vikram, a skilled computer hacker, has an unrequited crush on Jane, and brings his own problems into the mix in the form of an Arcadian obsessed with his capture. As they work together to find a way to stop the conspiracy, the Arcadians prove just how fearsome they are—some hunt humans for sport, some hunt for Travis in order to secure leverage over Hawk, and all of them are willing to use advanced surveillance technology to control the population and eliminate any threats to their rule.

    The Never Game, by Jeffery Deaver
    Jeffrey Deaver introduces a new protagonist in Colter Shaw, the son of a survivalist who travels the country in a mobile home taking on the search for people who the proper authorities can’t—or won’t—locate. Shaw is in California to search for Sophie Mulliner, who stormed out of her father’s house after an argument and was never seen again. The police think she’s just left town, but Shaw calculates long odds that she’s still alive. He quickly finds clues pointing to an abduction, and realizes the police who missed them were either incompetent or corrupt. When another abduction occurs, and then another, Shaw begins to piece together a connection between the crimes and a shadowy video game—and the uncertain fates of the victims puts a ticking clock on his efforts to track them down and save them from a terrifying fate.

    The Paris Diversion, by Chris Pavone
    Kate Moore appears to be just another young ex-pat in Paris, living comfortably as the wife of her hedge-fund manager husband Dexter. But Kate is much more than that: she’s a CIA agent under cover so deep not even Dexter knows their marriage is a sham. Despite all that, Kate has grown bored with her pretend-small life, but her malaise is shattered by two events: a young jihadi straps a bomb to himself and stands in front of the Louvre, and one of her husband’s wealthiest clients vanishes right before making announcing a major deal. Kate only gets more excited as the connections between the two events become clear, and relishes finally being able to dive into her real work—activating hidden support networks and chasing down leads in order to solve an increasingly twisted mystery.

    Vessel, by Lisa A. Nichols
    When the space mission onboard the Sagittarius ends in calamity, Catherine Wells is the only survivor to return to Earth, where she is met with suspicion. Catherine herself isn’t quite sure what to think; after nine years in space her personal relationships are already strained, and she’s experiencing memory loss, blackouts, and violent mood swings that make reconnecting with her family back on Earth enough of a challenge, never mind piecing together the events of a disaster in space. Cal Morganson, who is leading the follow-up mission and thus has a vested interest in figuring out what went wrong the first time, begins working directly with Catherine to try and get to the bottom of the mystery. It’s a story of confused identity and desperate survival—Blake Crouch’s Dark Matter meets Andy Weir’s The Martian.

    Reaper: Threat Zero—A Sniper Novel, by Nicholas Irving with A. J. Tata
    In the next thriller from bestselling author Nicholas Irving and A.J. Tata, a retired U.S. special operations forces sniper, decorated ex-military sniper Vick Harwood returns in an explosive story that begins when a caravan of vehicles bringing the families of U.S. cabinet members to Camp David is ambushed and its passengers are brutally murdered. Harwood watches the live feed of footage captured by a fellow Ranger, Sammie Samuelson, who confesses to the attack and commits suicide live on the internet. Harwood investigates with the help of an FBI agent, Valerie Hinojosa, and soon uncovers a terrorist plot, leading to his recruitment into Team Valid, an elite team directed by the president to extract revenge on the terrorists behind the heinous act by tracking down their families and executing them. But as Harwood and his team travel the world in search of their targets, he discovers evidence that suggests nothing is as it seems, and soon, he is fighting not only for justice, but to defend his own closely held moral code.

    What new books are thrilling you this month?

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  • Jeff Somers 9:00 pm on 2019/04/01 Permalink
    Tags: , bnstorefront-fiction, , , ,   

    April’s Best Thrillers 


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    Redemption, by David Baldacci
    Amos Decker, the Memory Man with the perfect recall, returns in more ways than one in Baldacci’s latest as he heads back to his hometown of Burlington, Ohio, with FBI partner Alex Jamison along for the ride. There, Decker meets Meryl Hawkins, the first person he ever arrested. Hawkins was convicted of murder and has spent years in jail, emerging ravaged by time and illness. Even as he’s dying, Hawkins insists to Decker that he didn’t commit those crimes, and Decker is shaken by the possibility that he made a youthful mistake that sent an innocent man to jail. Digging into the case, Decker discovers a connection to another crime—one that hasn’t been committed yet, and which he might be able to put a stop to if he can solve the puzzle in time.

    The 18th Abduction, by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
    Three teachers head out for a fun night in San Francisco after class, but their adventure turns deadly when the trio is abducted, tortured, and murdered. When one of their bodies is discovered, Detective Lindsay Boxer catches the case that has the city worrying over the safety and security of the entire school system. Lindsay turns to her best friend, investigative reporter Cindy Thomas, for help, and the fresh perspective reveals unexpected facets of the victims. The Women’s Murder Club must work together like never before to protect their families and their city from a terrifying threat.

    Neon Prey, by John Sandford
    When Howell Paine fails to pay back the money he owes loan shark Roger Smith, Smith sends violent thug Clayton Deese to punish him. But Paine fights back with an unexpected ferocity, and Deese is jammed up on racketeering charges. When Deese escapes his ankle bracelet and investigators discover partially-eaten bodies buried in his backyard, Lucas Davenport takes an interest and begins tracking the killer and the brutal gang he travels with as they journey across the country, pulling jobs to fuel their gambling and drug use. Worried that Deese is an unstable source of dire secrets that could ruin him, Smith decides he has to go, setting up a tense three-way game of cat-and-mouse Davenport fans are sure to love.

    I Know Who You Are: A Novel, by Alice Feeney
    When actress Aimee Sinclair’s husband Ben disappears from their London townhouse the day after a terrible fight, the police center their investigation on her. After security footage of a woman that looks a lot like Aimee cleaning out their bank accounts turns up, they suspect she’s hiding something—and she is, though it’s not what the police think. Aimee definitely has a secret, one she’s now convinced someone knows and is using against her. Juggling the investigation and an audition for a high-profile role in a disturbing, career-making film, Aimee slowly reveals her shocking past even as the present-day mystery develops, one unexpected clue at a time.

    Collusion, by Newt Gingrich and Pete Earley
    With a title guaranteed to catch your eye, long-time political insider Gingrich and co-writer Earley deliver an action thriller ripped from the headlines. When the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine is killed by terrorists, disgraced former Navy SEAL Brett Garrett is tasked with conveying an encrypted thumb drive to the president himself. The drive reveals that a high-ranking member of the Russian government intends to defect, and it falls on Garrett and the FBI’s expert on domestic terrorism, Valerie Mayberry, to bring him in and prevent a deadly poison attack on American soil. Standing in his way: corrupt politics, liberal protesters, and deadly enemies.

    Saving Meghan, by D.J. Palmer
    Meghan Gerard was once a vibrant star athlete with a bright future. But by age 15, she’s frequently with a broad range of mysterious ailments that her medical team can’t seem to explain. On the surface, her wealthy parents are devoted to her, especially her mother, Becky, but when Meghan takes a turn for the worse, the doctors begin to openly wonder if Becky is perhaps keeping Meghan sick in a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Becky finds herself racing against time to prove that Meghan is truly sick and in desperate need of help—and she’ll have to face her own dark history and family secrets along the way.

    The Mother-in-Law, by Sally Hepworth
    This tense thriller will appeal to anyone who’s ever had a less-than-friendly relationship with the in-laws. When Lucy marries Ollie, everything is perfect—except for her relationship with his mother Diana. A beloved member of the community, Diana is faultlessly polite and outwardly kind, but Lucy knows the woman doesn’t like her. When Diana appears to kill herself, leaving a note behind stating that she doesn’t want to live through the breast cancer she’s been diagnosed with, everyone is shocked. But what’s more shocking is the autopsy that finds no cancer whatsoever—but plenty of evidence that Diana was murdered. The revelation of changes to her will mean everyone in the family suddenly has a motive, and as the truth comes out, one thing is certain: the family will never be the same.

    True Believer, by Jack Carr
    Carr follows up The Terminal List with a thriller with an explosive twist: the most famous domestic terrorist in American history, former Navy SEAL James Reece, isn’t punished for pursuing his violent revenge on those who killed his family and colleagues. Instead, he’s recruited by the CIA as the one man who can turn the Iraqi commando coordinating a series of devastating attacks that have sowed chaos around the world. Offering Reece a pardon for himself and immunity for those who have protected him, the agency convinces a reluctant Reece to take on the job, setting him on a globe-trotting course that exposes a far-reaching conspiracy.

    The Invited, by Jennifer McMahon
    Helen and Nate Wetherell take the plunge and purchase 44 acres of land in rural Vermont on which to build their dream home. After they move into a trailer on the property and begin planning the project, however, they learn that a century before, a woman named Hattie Breckenridge was hanged as a witch on their property. Soon after, ominous things begin to happen. Pragmatic acience teacher Nate blames the locals who want them to stop building and go away, but as Helen investigates the history of the property, she becomes engrossed in Hattie’s legend—and convinced supernatural forces may be at work.

    The post April’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 6:15 pm on 2019/04/01 Permalink
    Tags: b&n picks, , bnstorefront-fiction,   

    April’s Best New Fiction 


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    This month brings an eclectic mix of historical fiction, with three novels set during the Reagan Era (or the Thatcher Era, depending which side of the Atlantic you’re on); two centered on life-altering friendships amid the Great War and World War II, respectively; and one about the corruption of naïve newlyweds during their honeymoon in 1957. Golfers will delight in James Patterson and Pete de Longe’s latest McKinley Miracle, and Sally Rooney returns with a powerful follow-up to her remarkable debut, Conversations with Friends.

    The Last, by Hanna Jameson
    A murder mystery set against the backdrop of nuclear war plays out in a Swiss hotel in this original thriller. Historian Jon Keller is stuck far from home when he and the other attendees of an academic conference in Switzerland learn that humanity’s last gasps may have arrived. Two fraught months after global devastation hits, the survivors living at L’Hotel Sizieme near Zurich discover a girl’s dead body in the building’s water tank, and Jon feels compelled to solve the mystery or lose what’s left of his ties to the world that was.

    Lost Roses, by Martha Hall Kelly
    In Lilac Girls, readers met Caroline Ferriday, a real-life heroine of World War II. Roses reveals what Caroline’s mother was up to a generation earlier. The year is 1914, and socialite Eliza Ferriday is delighted to have the chance to visit St. Petersburg with her friend Sofya Streshnayva serving as tour guide. Did I mention Sofya is related to the Romanovs, and will soon be forced to flee to Paris? Back home in New York, Eliza does her best to assist other Russian families escaping the revolution, but when Sofya abruptly ceases contact, Eliza worries for her friend’s life in this compelling drama based on true events.

    Miracle at St. Andrews, by James Patterson & Pete de Jonge
    Following their previous golf fantasies Miracle on the 17th Green and Miracle at Augusta, Patterson and de Jonge bring their still-striving hero Travis McKinley to the “Home of Golf”: St. Andrews in Scotland. Scotland also happens to be McKinley’s ancestral home, and following a recent disappointment at the Senior Tour, McKinley and his family are in need of some TLC in the form of a pilgrimage. Anyone who’s ever hit a slump in their professional or personal lives will relate to this uplifting tale.

    The Book of Dreams, by Nina George
    When Henri Skinner is placed in a medically induced coma following a terrible accident, his estranged 13-year-old son, Sam, keeps vigil by his side in the hospital. Sam is an intellectually gifted synesthete who experiences reality differently than most people (for example, he might feel sounds as colors). Also at the hospital are Henri’s former lover, Edwina, who is shocked to learn she’s been named Henri’s next of kin, and another coma patient, a young ballerina named Madeline, who catches Sam’s attention. As Henri and Madeline hover between this world and the next, readers will enter their memories and learn about the decisions they wish they could revisit.

    Machines Like Me, by Ian McEwan
    Set in an alternate history England in the Margaret Thatcher era, McEwan’s latest depicts a love triangle between a slacker narrator named Charlie, his upstairs neighbor and girlfriend Miranda, and Charlie’s new acquisition: Adam, an Alan Turing–created synthetic human. Charlie and Miranda design Adam’s characteristics beyond his factory pre-sets and the result is an Adam who is nearly indistinguishable from an actual person. The android quickly develops feelings for Miranda, writing her a staggering amount of haiku. This looks to be a thought-provoking tale about what it means to be human, set in a very different version of the 1980s.

    Wunderland, by Jennifer Cody Epstein
    Two teenage best friends, Ilse and Renate, grow up in Nazi Germany and find their once solid bond destroyed when one of them joins the Hitler Youth division for women and the other discovers her father’s ancestry puts her in the Gestapo’s crosshairs. Betrayals and secrets follow, and it’s not until Ilse’s daughter, Ava, raising her own family in New York’s East Village in the 1980s, digs into Ilse’s past decades that a full accounting of that fraught time can be made. Unflinchingly honest and perfect for book clubs, Wunderland doesn’t shy away from depicting a complex legacy and its deeply felt repercussions.

    Normal People, by Sally Rooney
    The Conversations with Friends author returns with another brilliant, award-winning novel centered on an intense push-pull relationship between two young people who love and harm each other in equal measure. In small-town Ireland, Connell is a popular soccer star in high school who unexpectedly (and secretly) grows close to isolated and socially awkward Marianne, whose wealthy family employs Connell’s mother as their housecleaner. As university students at Trinity College in Dublin, however, their power dynamic reverses; now it’s Marianne who effortlessly traverses the social scene and Connell who comes up short. Are they meant to be together, meant to push one another away, or meant to render each other perennially off-kilter as their standing in the world evolves?

    Cape May, by Chip Cheek
    In this intoxicating psychological drama, it’s 1957 and high school sweethearts Effie and Henry tie the knot and leave their Georgia hometown behind for a two-week honeymoon in Cape May, New Jersey. Surprised to discover that the seaside town is nearly deserted, the newlyweds almost cut their trip short. Instead, on a whim, they approach the lone lit-up house in sight and join the party within. Stripped of their innocence by a trio of decadent, gin-soaked acquaintances from Effie’s past, Effie and Henry will never be the same after the dust clears.

    Boy Swallows Universe, by Trent Dalton
    Dalton bursts onto the literary scene with a debut that’s sure to garner awards in his native Australia and worldwide. Twelve-year-old Eli Bell is determined to become a journalist, but first he’ll have to survive adolescence. Growing up in 1985 in a less-than-savory suburb of Brisbane, he lives with his electively mute older brother, August, and their loving but troubled mother, a heroin dealer who winds up in prison after her boyfriend is murdered. Ex-convict Slim, a babysitter of sorts known to the neighborhood as a multiple escapee from jail, provides unexpected stability and wisdom, but it’ll take everything Eli’s got to avenge his mother and expose the machinations of Tytus Broz, a notorious drug kingpin. This looks to be a coming-of-age book with a lot of bite and even more heart.

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  • Jeff Somers 7:00 pm on 2019/03/04 Permalink
    Tags: , bnstorefront-fiction, , , ,   

    March’s Best New Thrillers 


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    The Cornwalls Are Gone, by James Patterson and Brendan DuBois
    Army intelligence officer Amy Cornwall is skilled at dealing with scenarios that would make most people blanch. But nothing in her professional career prepares her for the sense of dread she experiences when she comes home to find her husband and young daughter missing. Contacted by the kidnapper, she is told there is only one way to save her family: she must somehow secure the release of an unnamed captive. She has two days to accomplish her mission, and if she fails, her family will be killed. Amy has no choice but to go rogue, using her training, contacts, and desperation to find out who took her family and why.

    Cemetery Road (B&N Exclusive Edition), by Greg Iles
    Marshall McEwan escaped Bienville when he was young, heading off to Washington D.C. to become a journalist. When his father’s death and his family’s struggling newspaper force him to return home, he finds a transformed town flush with sketchy money and controlled by Max Matheson’s shadowy Bienville Poker Club, and discover’s Max’s old flame Jet has married the man’s son. After Max is implicated in the murder of his wife, he insists Jet serve as his defense lawyer. She secretly teams up with Marshall to investigate the whole web of lies, corruption, and murder, acting as the confidential informant to the journalist. Soon, the whole town seems to turn against Marshall, refusing to deal with the horrifying truth he’s threatening to reveal. The B&N exclusive edition includes a note from Greg Iles to his readers.

    Beautiful Bad, by Annie Ward
    In Meadowlark, Kansas, police officer Diane Varga responds to a 911 call made from the home of Ian and Maddie Wilson. She finds the house empty, the kitchen trashed and covered in blood, and no sign of the couple or their young son. As Varga investigates, flashbacks tell the story of how Ian and Maddie met, their often rocky relationship, Ian’s work as a security consultant in Nigeria, his struggles with PTSD, as well as Maddie’s own battle with anxiety and depression following a terrible accident. The story slowly builds to revelations about what actually went on in the house before and after an emergency call that was cut off, and how it all relates back to the very beginnings of the relationship.

    The Persian Gamble, by Joel C. Rosenberg
    Rosenberg’s sequel to The Kremlin Conspiracy spins a thrilling story that feels like a secret history unfolding in real time. In a bold move against NATO, Russia plans an invasion of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania while simultaneously signing a mutual defense pact with North Korea, which has only pretended to give up its nuclear program. Oleg Kraskin, son-in-law to Russian president Luganov, sees the potential end of the world in his father-in-law’s plot and passes information about his schemes to former secret service agent Marcus Ryker. They link up with the CIA’s Moscow station chief Jenny Morris in a desperate attempt to stop the mad president’s plans.

    The Perfect Alibi: A Novel, by Phillip Margolin
    Star athlete Blaine Hastings is convicted of rape despite his passionate, angry denials, largely due to the incontrovertible DNA evidence. While he’s in prison a second rape is committed, with DNA evidence pointing to the same culprit—which should be impossible. With a new lawyer, Blaine gets a fresh trial and is released on bail. His original lawyer is soon found dead. Fearing for her safety, the original rape victim hires young attorney Robin Lockwood, a skilled MMA fighter who is also handling another client charged with murder, despite clear evidence the act was committed in self-defense. Soon, Lockwood comes to suspect the two cases are connected, but she’ll have to act quickly to prove her theory before someone else winds up dead.

    My Lovely Wife, by Samantha Downing
    When the body of a young woman named Lindsay is discovered in an abandoned motel, it’s shocking—especially to the narrator of the book, who, along with his wife Millicent, had previously kidnapped her as part of a twisted attempt to inject sick thrills into their stale marriage. Millicent was supposed to kill Lindsay quickly and dispose of her body, but confesses she decided it would be better if the crime scene mimicked those of a notorious local serial killer. While the husband is intrigued by the possibility of hiding a murder spree behind another string of killings, the downside to this trick is the increased attention the crime receives.

    Dark Tribute: An Eve Duncan Novel, by Iris Johansen
    Johansen’s 24th Even Duncan novel kicks off with deceptive calm. Eve’s ward, violin prodigy Cara Delaney, leaves a celebrated performance and travels to Atlanta to meet her friend Jock in hopes of convincing him their intense bond should evolve into something romantic. At the hotel they’re both staying at, however, Cara’s whole world is turned upside-down when she’s abducted by a man bent on against Eve and her husband Joe Quinn. While Eve and Joe scramble to chase down clues, Cara must use all of her wits to survive.

    The Woman in the Dark, by Vanessa Savage
    After accidentally overdosing in the wake of her mother’s death, Sarah and her husband Tom decide to move their family into Tom’s childhood home. Sarah insists her brush with suicide was an accident, and that the change of scenery will be a wonderful way to leave grief behind. When they arrive, however, they find the house has been abandoned for 15 years after its last occupants were brutally murdered. They move into what the locals call the “Murder House” anyway. As Tom becomes obsessed with the crime, odd objects from the house’s past begin to turn up on their doorstep. When Sarah learns the murderer has just been released from prison—and that the sole survivor is in town too—she begins to doubt her husband’s stories of his own childhood in the house. As her struggle with depression worsens, Sarah grows desperate to protect her children from what increasingly seems like a supernatural evil within the residence. Or is it all in her head?

    The post March’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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