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  • Jeff Somers 7:00 pm on 2019/01/31 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , , ,   

    February’s Best New Thrillers 


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    The Chef, by James Patterson and Max DiLallo
    James Patterson continues to innovate and push envelopes in terms of marketing and distribution. Case in point: his newest collaboration with DiLallo was first published on Facebook Messenger. Police detective and food truck chef Caleb Rooney serves New Orleans in both capacities, but as Mardi Gras approaches, he finds himself accused of murder. (It probably doesn’t help that his food truck is called the Killer Chef.) Shortly thereafter, Rooney discovers a plot to attack New Orleans being brewed up by home-grown terrorists. Racing against time, Rooney must clear his own name while preventing a slaughter in his beloved city as it gears up for Mardi Gras—the perfect tasty backdrop for a tense thriller.

    The Border, by Don Winslow
    Don Winslow concludes his bloody, operatic trilogy delving into the chaotic war on drugs with a suitably intense final act. After losing everything but his career in the war against drug kingpin Adán Barrera, Art Keller finds himself at the top of the DEA with Barrera defeated. But the war on drugs has come home in a flood of cheap heroin that’s killing Americans at a record pace. As Keller moves to block this deadly invasion, he finds himself fighting not Mexican drug cartels, but his own bosses in Washington. Politically motivated enemies are one thing, but Keller begins to suspect the unbelievable truth—the incoming administration is actually partnered with the very cartels he’s spent his life fighting.

    Never Tell, by Lisa Gardner
    Gardner’s 10th D.D. Warren thriller opens with Warren and other police breaking down the door to Evelyn Carter’s house, where they find the pregnant teacher standing over her dead husband, gun in hand. Warren remembers Evelyn from a case 16 years before, in which she accidentally shot and killed her own father, and decides it can’t be a coincidence. But when the killing gets some publicity, trusted informant Flora Dane contacts Warren to tell her that Evelyn’s husband was an associate of her kidnapper. As the investigation pivots into the possible connections between the two men, the complications pile up, as Gardner explores how well we can truly know anyone—even our closest loved ones.

    Mission Critical, by Mark Greaney
    The Gray Man is back for an eighth adventure from Greaney, with Court Gentry receiving a sudden summons to Langley. He boards a jet in Zurich, which lands in Luxembourg to pick up a hooded prisoner and head on to England, where the CIA intends to deliver the prisoner over to MI6. Upon arrival, however, the teams are attacked by gunman, who leave behind a bloody slaughter as they race off with the prisoner. As the Gray Man pursues in a powered glider, his sometimes-lover Zoya Zakharova of Russian Intelligence barely survive an attack that leaves her handlers dead. As Gentry and Zakharova work both sides of the mystery, it becomes clear that these violent attacks are connected—but the culprits’ careful planning didn’t take the Gray Man’s skills into account.

    The Silent Patient, by Alex Michaelides
    Michaelides delivers an assured, confident debut thriller. Six years ago, artist Alicia Berenson painted a psychologically dense work based on a Greek myth, then allegedly tied her husband Gabriel to a chair and shot him in the face. Alicia hasn’t spoken a word since, spending her time in a drugged daze at the Grove, a secure forensic facility in North London. Theo Faber is the wounded, gifted psychotherapist who convinces Alicia’s doctors to let him try to get her to speak. Theo’s work with the silent patient is interspersed with excerpts Alicia’s diary leading up to the day of Gabriel’s murder. As the clues about what truly happened begin to fall into place, Theo’s personal and professional worlds blur dangerously, leading to an explosive conclusion.

    The Hiding Place, by C. J. Tudor
    Joseph Thorne returns to his home town of Arnhill with alleged plans to teach at his old school and give back to his community, but the truth is, he’s really back in response to a mysterious email that claims to know what happened to Joe’s sister in her youth, and promises it is happening again. Joe moves into a cottage where a woman recently murdered her young son and committed suicide, and begins to plot revenge on behalf of his sister Annie, who disappeared decades before. Joe deals with ghosts, loan sharks, and unfriendly locals with cynical humor and grim determination, as Annie’s ultimate fate is slowly, painfully exhumed. Tudor’s followup to buzzy thriller The Chalk Man is every bit as tense and satisfying.

    The post February’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2019/01/31 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , elizabeth letts, , finding dorothy, frances liardet, i owe you one, jill santopolo, more than words, , , tara conklin, the girls at 17 swann street, the last romantics, we must be brave, yara zgheib   

    February’s Best New Fiction of 2019 


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    This month’s best books are all about love: love of siblings, love of spouses, love of work, love of children (both biological and adopted) and even love of oneself. Whether you’re a rom-com fanatic or prefer family sagas that span decades, these books will take you on emotional journeys you won’t soon forget.

    We Must Be Brave, by Frances Liardet
    Ellen Parr never wanted children. At least, that’s the story she tells herself, and to an extent, it’s true; her beloved, older husband is incapable of it, and she’s made peace with that fact. That is, until 5-year-old Pamela enters her life. It’s 1940 and Pamela’s been abandoned on a bus of evacuees that shows up in Southhampton. The bond between the surrogate mother and daughter is swiftly established but no less strong for it. Three years later, Pamela is returned to a biological family member, and Ellen is left behind, devastated. In the decades that pass, she leans on her husband, neighbors, and, eventually, a boarding school student who reminds her of the child she lost. This looks to be an extraordinarily moving and realistic historical.

    More Than Words, by Jill Santopolo
    In her second novel for adults (she also writes for children and young adults), Santopolo builds on the international success of The Light We Lost with a story about a woman whose sense of self is thrown into chaos. When Nina Gregory, a political speechwriter and hotel heiress, learns some hard truths about her late father, whom she idolized and adored, she is forced to view those closest to her in a new light. Her staid, childhood best friend-turned-fiancé, Tim, represents her father’s wishes for her, but her boss, New York mayoral candidate Rafael, is the one who ignites her passions. With her perceptions of the past shattered, how will she decide where her future, and her ambitions, truly lie?

    Finding Dorothy, by Elizabeth Letts
    Based on the real life of Maude Gage Baum, L. Frank Baum’s wife, Dorothy takes place in dual timelines: in 1938 during the filming of the Wizard of Oz; and in the later half of the 1800s as Maude comes of age as a suffragette’s daughter and grows up to become a married mother of four. Long widowed by the time MGM begins filming her husband’s book, Maude is determined to get on set and make sure L. Frank’s vision is properly reflected. She doesn’t expect to feel so protective of the movie’s teenage star, Judy Garland, who clearly needs an advocate and champion in her life. Letts’ previous books have been non-fiction, and her experience in that milieu help make this a heartfelt and detailed historical that’s perfect for film buffs and book clubs.

    I Owe You One, by Sophie Kinsella
    The Shopaholic books will always have a place in my heart, but Kinsella’s rom-com standalones have been knocking it out of the park lately. In the last two years alone we’ve been gifted with My Not-So Perfect Life and Surprise Me, and now there’s I Owe You One, which depicts the slow-burn relationship of selfless, responsible Fixie and investment manager Sebastian. After a meet-cute involving the near-death experience of a laptop, Sebastian writes Fixie an IOU, which she uses to secure her slacker boyfriend, Ryan, a job. Now she owes Sebastian a favor, and soon, the IOUs stack up in both directions in ways neither could have anticipated, making Fixie wonder if her penchant for helping others may be holding her back from pursuing the life she wants.

    The Girls at 17 Swann Street, by Yara Zgheib
    According to Anna Roux, former dancer and current supermarket cashier, her “real occupation” is anorexia. At twenty-six years old, having moved from Paris to St. Louis in support of her husband Matthias, to whom she’s been married for three years, Anna is a ghost of her former self. Dangerously underweight, depressed, and exhausted (she sleeps about three hours per night, and exercises relentlessly), Anna honestly doesn’t think she has a problem. Her admittance to 17 Swann Street, a residential treatment center, is the beginning of her journey back to health. As she gets to know her fellow patients and reflects on her life, she slowly gains insight into her condition. A poetic, deeply felt, and authentic debut.

    The Last Romantics, by Tara Conklin
    In the year 2079, elderly Fiona Skinner, an accomplished poet, thinks back to the 1980s, and the breakdown of her family life following her father’s death. The youngest of four siblings, Fiona and her two sisters and one brother (ranging in age from 4 to 11) were forced to raise one another for two years until their widowed mother crawled out from her debilitating depression. As an adult, Fiona filled her life with scandalous blog posts and a career at a nonprofit climate change organization, but her lasting legacy turns out to be the poem that made her famous, chronicling the story of her sisters and their concern for their brother Joe, who seems to have become the most damaged among them. A family saga that’s perfect for fans of Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists.

    The post February’s Best New Fiction of 2019 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 3:00 pm on 2019/01/31 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , Current Events, dave cullen, , i'll be gone in the dark, michelle mcnamara, parkland: birth of a movement,   

    February’s Best New History & Current Events Books 


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    If you’re reading this, congrats, you made it through the first month of 2019. Considering the state of the world, you deserve a reward for this feat of survival—and nothing’s better than a book. This month offers an insightful work of history about Wild Bill Hickock, the late Michelle McNamara’s powerful investigation into the Golden State Killer case, a ripped-from-the-headlines examination of the Parkland shooting, a considerations of the current state of journalism, and a look at the FBI under the Trump administration.

    Parkland: Birth of a Movement, by Dave Cullen
    In some ways the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was all too typical: innocent victims, a deranged killer, a media frenzy, thoughts and prayers. But something unusual happened in its aftermath: the kids who survived didn’t just go back to their lives and let the murders fade into our collective memory alongside so many earlier such tragedies. They made noise. They started a movement. Cullen, who as a journalist covered the 1999 Columbine shootings and in 2009 published an exhaustive account of what was, up to that point, the deadliest school shooting in history, was drawn to these kids and their courage, and inspired to tell their story. Here, he details not just the grim facts of the killings, but the reaction of the extraordinary youths who lived through it, and decided to fight back against a culture they felt seemed to have long ago resigned itself to mass violence as a part of life in the modern United States.

    I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer, by Michelle McNamara
    Michelle McNamara passed away in 2016 at the age of 46, but left behind a powerful legacy in the form of this book, now available in paperback. It’s the result of her years-long investigation into the serial rapist and murderer she dubbed the Golden State Killer, who, thanks in part to McNamara’s efforts o draw additional attention to the cold case, was finally captured in 2018. When she began tracing the crimes in 2011, DNA testing had already linked more than 50 sexual assaults and murders dating back to the mid-1970s to a single man.. The attacks stopped after a decade, and the killer disappeared—but McNamara, with the help of others who gathered at her website, tracked him tirelessly through the available evidence. After her unexpected passing, her team continued the work, finishing this remarkable book, which skillfully combines true-crime details with a novelist’s flare for storytelling.

    Wild Bill: The True Story of the American Frontier’s First Gunfighter, by Tom Clavin
    Wild Bill Hickok is a curious historical figure: both incredibly famous and yet largely mysterious. Clavin employs a wide net in terms of source material to track Hickock’s life from his birth in 1837, to his first jobs in law enforcement, to the development of the quick-draw gunfighting style that made him famous—and made him a target for anyone seeking to make their name as a gunslinger. The portrait that emerges is of a man who shot first and worried later, resulting in occasional collateral damage—and yet he was ultimately killed after being shot in the back, because he didn’t regard his murderer as a threat. It’s sometimes hard to believe the Old West actually existed and wasn’t just the stuff of Hollywood films, but Clavin brings it all to vivid life in this gripping account of one of its most famous inhabitants.

    Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts, by Jill Abramson
    Former New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson examines the rise, fall, and rise of journalism in the modern age in a book made suddenly very timely by the recently announcement of layoffs across several major media outlets, including Buzzfeed. That company is one of four Abramson follows as she traces the impact of the internet on the news, alongside with the Times, The Washington Post, and Vice. The initial assumption—that the old-school newspapers would fail while the disruptive upstarts would triumph with clickbait—didn’t quite pan out; the former managed to pivot to online subscriptions while the latter upped their game in terms of journalistic quality. Yet the price of this transformation may have been paid by us, the audience, who now have to pore over news that blurs the lines between advertising, reporting, and mere spectacle.

    The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump, by Andrew G. McCabe
    When Andrew McCabe was fired by President Donald Trump a little over a day before his scheduled retirement, it seemed to many to be a petty and unnecessary action against a man who had served his country and the FBI with distinction. In this memoir, McCabe offers a thoughtful and powerful defense of his career, and concludes that the biggest threat to the FBI and the United States isn’t an external one—it’s the president and the administration that views the nation’s top law enforcement organization as alternately a threat and a private police force. McCabe served in the FBI for decades at all levels, and brings that experience to bear in his argument.

    The post February’s Best New History & Current Events Books appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 3:00 pm on 2019/01/02 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , ,   

    January’s Best New Fiction 


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    Kicking off 2019 is a Gilded Age story about the American heiress who scandalized two nations prior to giving birth to Winston Churchill, and three World War II-era novels centered on women: Hedy Lamarr, movie star and secret STEM pioneer; a pair of sisters working at an Armory factory; and the ten women who served as Hitler’s food tasters. Contemporary fans will devour author Kristen “Cat Person” Roupenian’s first collection of short stories and Jane Corry’s twisty mystery about a missing ex-husband.

    The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict
    She was born Hedwig “Hedy” Kiesler and survived a domineering husband and the Third Reich, but you know her as Hedy Lamarr, glamorous movie star. That one woman could be both those things, as well as a world-changing scientist, proves the adage that truth is stranger than fiction. Benedict has made a name for herself shining a spotlight on the oft-hidden contributions of women in STEM. Her previous historical novels revealed the influence of Einstein’s wife and Andrew Carnegie’s maid on the course of human events. The tale of Hedy Lamarr is no less fascinating, as the eventual MGM actress outmaneuvers Nazis and eventually creates an invention that assists the Allied forces in World War II.

    Turning Point, by Danielle Steel
    The most highly regarded trauma doctors in San Francisco get the chance of a lifetime to participate in a mass-casualty training exchange in Paris. When a terrible shooting in their adopted city forces them to use their new skills under shocking circumstances, their lives are forever changed. As usual, Steel’s characters are both relatable and extraordinary, and you’ll be rooting for the troubled ER physicians as they attempt to balance relationships and professional obligations while saving as many victims as possible after the tragic attack.

    The Dreamers, by Karen Thompson Walker
    The entire town of Santa Lora, California, is forced into quarantine when several college students succumb to a mysterious, deadly disease that keeps people asleep but dreaming—and the dreams have lives of their own. When Mei, a freshman, discovers that her roommate cannot be woken, she joins forces with another student to do all she can to help. Within the houses surrounding the university are friends, neighbors, families, and children desperate to protect one another. This looks to be a richly haunting and immersive read.

    The Wartime Sisters, by Lynda Cohen Loigman
    Estranged sisters Millie and Ruth are forced into each other’s orbits while working at an Armory factory in Springfield during World War II. Widowed Millie was known as “the pretty one” during her youth, doted on and indulged by everyone in her Brooklyn neighborhood in the 1930s. Ruth’s experience in the same household felt like a different world; her intelligence was diminished and dismissed, her attempts at dating thwarted (suitors always ended up pursuing Millie). As adults, Ruth appears to have come out on top with her role as the wife of a high-ranking Armory scientist, while Millie toils in production. But the sisters will never truly reconcile until they confront the painful secrets of the past. As with Loigman’s debut, The Two-Family House, this appears to be a deeply compelling historical.

    At the Wolf’s Table, by Rosella Postorino (translated by Leah Janeczko)
    The winner of Italy’s Premio Campiello Literary Prize, Table tells the story of Adolf Hitler’s food tasters, a group of ten women forced to eat the Fuhrer’s meals before he does, in case they are poisoned. Twenty-something Berliner Rosa Sauer narrates the fraught tale, set in Hitler’s secret headquarters near the countryside of Gross-Partsch, where Rosa has relocated to live with her in-laws in light of her husband’s service on the frontlines. Rather than comforting and relying on one another, the group of tasters form segregated factions based on their views of Hitler and the war, and Rosa finds herself, in her loneliness, turning to her SS supervisor for a terrible, guilt-ridden type of comfort.

    You Know You Want This, by Kristen Roupenian
    Roupenian’s short story, “Cat Person,” went viral after the New Yorker published it in 2017, but even if you memorized it (someone probably has, right?), there are lots of surprises awaiting you in Roupenian’s debut short story collection. Highlighting characters who are dark, hilarious, awful, and amazing, these tales will make you shriek with discomfort and enjoyment, daring you to revel in the anti-hero and -heroines’ downright frightening behavior and relationships.

    That Churchill Woman, by Stephanie Barron
    Megan Markle and Prince Harry have got nothin’ on Jennie Jerome: the impetuous, 20-year-old American heiress raised in Gilded Age splendor who married Lord Randolph Spencer-Churchill—after knowing him for three days. Although the lavish excesses of Jennie’s life may seem glorious, they also served to prevent her from having a voice, and Jennie, raised to be independent, is not having it. That Jennie gives birth to future Prime Minister Winston Churchill is almost beside the point in this exhilarating historical about a woman who scandalized and intrigued two nations while living life on her own terms.

    The Dead Ex, by Jane Corry
    The author of My Husband’s Wife and Blood Sisters is back with a mystery thriller about an aromatherapist, Vicki, whose former husband, an abusive, manipulative man, goes missing. Vicki claims she hasn’t seen David in years, but the police are skeptical, particularly because Vicki’s epilepsy may have affected her memory. David’s current wife, Tanya, is hiding something as well. Vicki’s tribulations as suspect number one are juxtaposed with an earlier timeline depicting the saga of young Scarlet, whose beloved albeit drug dealing mother, Zelda, is arrested, forcing Scarlet into dubious foster care. How Scarlet and Zelda’s path intertwines with that of Vicki, David, and Tanya’s is just one of the questions that will grip readers.

    The post January’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 7:05 pm on 2018/11/01 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , ,   

    November’s Best New Fiction 


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    November is full of drama and suspense, with new offerings from fan favorites Liane Moriarty, Danielle Steel, Jeffrey Archer, and Barbara Taylor Bradford. A holiday farce and a serial-killing sister provide light and dark laughs for every mood, and Jonathan Lethem returns with his first detective story since 2000’s Motherless Brooklyn.

    Nine Perfect Strangers, by Liane Moriarty
    The Big Little Lies author is back with an addictive thriller set at a health retreat. Tranquillum House promises a total mind and body transformation for its well-to-do guests over an intense ten days. Among the group hoping for a mental and physical rebirth are a romance writer and a young woman whose troubled family is along for the ride. None of the nine have any idea what they’re in for, though some of them can’t help but wonder if they’d be better off running from the secluded resort as fast as they can.

    Beauchamp Hall, by Danielle Steel
    If you’ve ever dreamed of trading the real world for Downton Abbey, you have something in common with Winnie Farmington. Unlucky in love and career, Winnie’s love for the British television show Beauchamp Hall keeps her going when everything else feels hopeless. An impulsive trip to England to visit the town where the series is filmed leads to a magical new chapter in her life.

    Heads You Win, by Jeffrey Archer
    Archer is in excellent form with his latest book, a thrilling, surprising double storyline featuring one character with two fates. As a boy growing up in the late 1960s, Alex Karpenko flees Russia with his mother after his father is murdered by the KGB. Will the two of them emigrate to Great Britain or America? Why not both, and watch the chips fall? The tale spans thirty years and follows Alex’s opposing paths, each of which requires a return to Mother Russia and a confrontation with his past.

    Tony’s Wife, by Adriana Trigiani
    Chi Chi Donatelli’s fierce independence is incongruous with the era in which she lives: the Jersey Shore in the 1940s. She has no interest in becoming a wife or mother until she has lived out her dream of singing with her favorite orchestras, and dreamy big-band entertainer Saverio Armandonada is just the man to make that happen. Their partnership spans radio, TV, and the nightclub circuit, and their inevitable marriage is upended by World War II. But stick around, because their passionate love story is just getting started.

    Fox 8, by George Saunders (illustrated by Chelsea Cardinal)
    Fox lovers will adore this novella-length story by the award-winning Saunders, whose melancholic Lincoln in the Bardo won the 2017 Man Booker Prize. Fox 8 is considered by his pack to have his furry head in the clouds, but his curiosity about people (and his penchant for learning children’s bedtime stories by eavesdropping underneath windows) may ultimately save his brethren when it comes time to seek out food in a neighborhood beset by danger.

    Night of Miracles, by Elizabeth Berg
    An uplifting, standalone sequel to The Story of Arthur Truluv, this delicious companion novel centers on Arthur’s friend Lucille, now living in Arthur’s home and newly inspired to teach baking classes there as a means of keeping busy. Familiar faces sign up for lessons, and when a new family moves in next door, they’re folded into the group of friends and loved ones while coming to grips with a difficult health crisis.

    The Feral Detective, by Jonathan Lethem
    A Motherless Brooklyn for the west coast, Feral Detective marks Jonathan Lethem’s first detective story in nearly twenty years. The inland empire of California’s desert is the perfect locale for his brand of off-the-grid noir, in which Manhattanite Phoebe Siegler hires the detective of the title, animal-loving vagabond Charles Heist, to find her friend’s missing teenage daughter, last seen near Mount Baldy. Up-to-the-minute commentary on today’s political atmosphere, conspiracies, and cultlike thinking inject an urgency into the hallucinatory, miragelike setting.

    The Splendor Before the Dark, by Margaret George
    In 2017’s The Confessions of Young Nero, our narrator proved to be an idealistic cultivator of artistry, beauty, and athleticism. In this second and final installment, and contrary to popular belief, Nero doesn’t fiddle while Rome burns, but he does take advantage of its destruction to mold a new society from the ashes, one that’s worthy of his self-perceived glory. Though his marriage to Poppaea seems perfect, the adoration of his people constant, not everyone is pleased with the power he wields and the decisions he makes (ahem, Golden House…). A traitor in his midst is about to make this anger known, and readers will feel completely absorbed by this sensitive, complex character study.

    Master of His Fate, by Barbara Taylor Bradford
    Kicking off a new Victorian-era saga, master of historical fiction Bradford introduces us to self-made James Lionel Falconer, a charming, would-be merchant prince enjoying a secret dalliance with an older woman, and Alexis Malvern, an aristocratic but charitable-minded young woman who has no desire to wed—until she meets Sebastian Trevelyan, fifteen years her senior, and romantic yearnings sweep her away. With their parallel lives and headstrong ambitions, it’s only a matter of time before the Falconer and Merchant families collide in this detail-rich series opener.

    Come With Me, by Helen Schulman
    In this modern, tech-soaked family drama, a virtual reality “choose your own adventure” program allows users to contemplate the alternate paths their lives might have taken if multiple universes were accessible. For employee and test subject Amy, a wife and mother who fears her husband Dan is unfaithful, that means bringing her own fantasies into the mix. Dan just wishes he could have a second chance at a jet-setting journalism career, and his decisions in that regard throws his relationship with Amy and their three children into chaos and heartbreak that may or may not be fixable.

    The Adults, by Caroline Hulse
    A comedic farce that sears all the goo out of Christmas fables, The Adults centers on Matt and Claire, former spouses who share a seven-year-old daughter, Scarlett. The alleged grown-ups decide to put aside their differences and spend Christmas together at a forced-fun theme park called Happy Forest—along with their new love interests, Patrick and Alex. Scarlett also brings a plus one in the form of her imaginary and opinionated bunny, Posey. Tension escalates with hilarious and unexpected results.

    My Sister, the Serial Killer, by Oyinkan Braithwaite
    This suspenseful, mordant, and clever debut finds sisters Ayoola and Korede, who live in Lagos, Nigeria, perfecting the art of murder. Whenever beautiful, favored sibling Ayoola kills a boyfriend (three thus far), Korede, a shy, empathetic nurse, hides the crime and disposes the evidence. But when Ayoola sets her sights on Tade, a physician colleague of Korede’s whom Korede adores, the sisters’ latent sibling rivalry threatens to consume them.

    The post November’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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