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  • Jeff Somers 3:00 pm on 2018/10/01 Permalink
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    October’s Best Thrillers 

    The Reckoning, by John Grisham
    Grisham’s latest is a compelling mystery set in the wake of World War II. Veteran Pete Banning, now enjoying civilian life as a farmer, gets up one day, has breakfast with his sister, and then drives into town and shoots the Reverend Dexter Bell three times, killing him. Banning makes no attempt to resist arrest, and only states that he has “nothing to say” about the murder. Is it connected to his wife, Liza, so recently committed to a hospital? Or is there a less obvious mystery afoot? As the community struggles to understand what’s happened, Grisham digs deeply into Banning’s backstory, following his journey through life and war on the way to a killing no one understands.

    Dark Sacred Night, by Michael Connelly
    Connelly pairs up two of his most enduring characters as Harry Bosch, now retired and working cases for his own reasons, and LAPD Detective Renée Ballard see their paths cross. After Ballard files a sexual harassment claim against the police department, she gets relegated to the graveyard shift. One night she catches Bosch looking through an old case file, researching the unsolved murder of a runaway girl in 2009. When she learns the girl’s mother, Daisy, is staying with Bosch as he helps her recover from drug addiction, Renée is moved to help. Meanwhile, Bosch’s other activities have put him directly in the sights of one of the most violent and ruthless street gangs in the area, Varrio San Fer 13, making the new partnership an extremely dangerous one—not that the detective is the type to spook easily.

    Ambush, by James Patterson and James O. Born
    When Detective Michael Bennett receives an anonymous tip that leads him into an attempted assassination, he quickly realizes it’s the work of a talented and mysterious professional, who soon targets Bennett’s family, while serving perfect red herrings clues to keep Bennett and his fellow cops chasing their tails. As Bennett puts the pieces together while protecting everyone he cares about, he realizes that while the assassin’s motivates are related to the rival cartels trying to corner the city’s drug traffic—cartels that may have joined forces to take out their main obstacle: Detective Michael Bennett.

    Paper Gods, by Goldie Taylor
    When Ezra Hawkins, a long-serving black congressman from Georgia, is assassinated, a hunt begins for both the killer and the congressman’s replacement. On the same day, infamous reporter Hampton Bridges is almost killed in a car accident that doesn’t seem so accidental, which drives him to dig even harder into the seamy underbelly of Georgia politics. Hawkins’ obvious successor would be his protégé, Atlanta Mayor Torrie Dodds—but dissatisfaction with Hawkins has soured Dodds, who resents a system controlled by wealthy white elites. As Bridges tracks down corruption and skulduggery, more killings ensue, and Dodds finds a mysterious link between the victims—one of whom is her own disgraced brother.

    The Night in Question, by Nic Joseph
    Paula Wilson works a rideshare gig to help with the medical bills that are crushing her family. One night she picks up her final passenger and is thrilled to recognize famous musician Ryan Hooks in her backseat. When she brings him to his destination and he’s met by a woman decidedly not his equally famous wife, Paula does something desperate—she suggests the best way to keep his meeting out of the papers is to pay her. But when it later turns out someone was murdered at that address, Paula realizes she might be the only person to know about Hooks’ secret affair, and thus the only witness to a terrible crime.

    The Trust, by Ronald H. Balson
    Balson’s fourth book following Liam Taggart and Catherine Lockhart sees Liam returning with reluctance to Northern Ireland for a funeral. He isn’t looking forward to seeing his family again, but is soon  astonished to find he’s been named the executor of his uncle’s secret trust, which can only be settled after Fergus’ murder is solved. Liam is forced to do the last thing he wants: take a deep dive into his family’s affairs, their long-standing connection to the IRA and the Troubles, and the skein of greed, resentment, and violence at the end of his every inquiry. Whoever killed Fergus is undoubtedly watching.

    Smile, by Roddy Doyle
    Booker Prize-winner Doyle returns with a fascinating character study that follows Victor Forde, a past-his-prime radio commentator who returns to his dingy hometown after separating from his celebrity chef wife. Abandoning his determination to make friends and do some writing, Forde drinks his sorrows away at Donnelly’s pub, spending time with the locals and then tottering off to work on a project he never quite gets started. One night at Donnelly’s, Forde encounters an old schoolmate, Fitzpatrick, a man he quite doesn’t remember from hisviolent years at St. Martin’s Christian Brothers School. Fitzpatrick forces Forde to revisit those dark childhood years, unraveling a decades-old mystery and memories of sexual abuse, and slowly becomes the man’s unlikely best friend, as Doyle builds to an ending both unexpected and inevitable.

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  • Melissa Albert 2:00 pm on 2018/10/01 Permalink
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    October’s Best New Fiction 

    October brings chill winds and warm comfort food, with books to match. Stephen King and Anne Rice provide the chills, with new tales of Castle Rock and the vampire Lestat, respectively; and Nicholas Sparks, Kate Morton, and Mitch Albom provide the comfort with heartfelt dramas. Jodie Picoult’s ensemble about a women’s health clinic under attack is perfect for book groups, and Jan Karon’s collection of Father Tim’s advice makes a beautiful gift for Mitford fans.

    The Clockmaker’s Daughter, by Kate Morton
    An artist’s retreat in the summer of 1862 along the banks of the Thames ends in murder, thievery, and ruination for its host and guests. A century and a half later, archivist Elodie Winslow comes across some tantalizing clues about the events of that pivotal season, which she believes may connect with her own family history. Fans of The Lake House and The Secret Keeper know Morton excels at dual timelines and complex emotions.

    Every Breath, by Nicholas Sparks
    Sparks’s twentieth book is a breathtakingly romantic story about two strangers who meet at a North Carolina beach town and change each other’s lives in unexpected ways. Lonely-hearted Hope—whose boyfriend of six years still won’t commit—has returned to her family’s cottage to sell the property in light of her father’s failing health. Tru is a safari leader from Zimbabwe who’s compelled to seek out his biological dad. Over a fateful five days, they’re brought together for something grander and more heart-wrenching than either is prepared for. Keep your Kleenex handy! 

    The Next Person You  Meet in Heaven, by Mitch Albom
    Speaking of tearjerkers, the long-anticipated sequel to Albom’s 2003 smash hit, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, will have readers alternating between smiling and sobbing, and we wouldn’t have it any other way. As a child, Annie survived a Coney Island–esque roller-coaster accident in which maintenance engineer Eddie sacrificed himself to save her. Now grown up, Annie seemingly succumbs to tragedy on her wedding day, but she still has many lessons to learn about life, loss, and love. The B&N exclusive edition contains a bonus chapter you won’t want to miss.

    A Spark of Light, by Jodi Picoult
    A thoughtful and harrowing ensemble drama set at a Mississippi women’s health clinic under attack from a gunman, Light’s timeline travels backward as we get to know the hostages and law enforcement members involved. Multiple viewpoints invite readers to empathize with each character, from the nurses, doctors, protestors, and patients trapped inside, to the hostage negotiator trying to save his injured sister and fifteen-year-old daughter. The B&N exclusive edition provides an author interview and reading group guide. 

    Elevation, by Stephen King
    Just in time for Halloween, take a trip to Castle Rock, King’s favorite spooky locale, in a novella about what it means to be a member of a community. A man with a mysterious, possibly supernatural health problem dislikes the couple next door because their dog is a nuisance to him, but when he learns their restaurant is failing due solely to the homophobia of his fellow townspeople (the restauranteurs are lesbians), he makes it his mission to stand by them and shine a light on prejudice. 

    Killing Commendatore, by Haruki Murakami (translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen)
    A lonely portrait painter going through a domestic crisis holes up in the mountain home of a famous, dementia-afflicted artist. There, the unnamed narrator teaches classes and discovers a never-before-seen, disturbing painting in the attic. The titular image has a story all its own, and a mystical, fever-dream journey ensues, denoted by the nightly ringing bells that torment our hero. Additional elements (cats, an homage to The Great Gatsby) make this an imaginative, vintage Murakami novel. 

    Blood Communion: A Tale of Prince Lestat, by Anne Rice
    Packed with appearances by Rice’s most beloved vampire creations, Communion feels like a reunion. Book thirteen in the Vampire Chronicles finds Lestat the Vampire Prince revealing how he came to rule the vampire world and how he intends to keep a peaceful court. However, Rhoshamandes has different plans for Lestat’s “Children of the Universe,” and you can bet they will involve a glorious and bloody battle.

    Bathed in Prayer: Father Tim’s Prayers, Sermons, and Reflections from the Mitford Series, by Jan Karon
    When the internationally bestselling Mitford Series began in 1989, the stories were published in the Blowing Rocket newspaper of Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Fourteen books and countless fans later, lead character Father Tim Kavanaugh, the town’s Episcopal rector, has earned a collection dedicated to his words of comfort and wisdom as explored throughout the series. Included in the compilation are inspirational essays and personal anecdotes from Karon, a former advertising executive going strong in her eighties. 

    Virgil Wander, by Leif Enger
    Greenstone, Minnesota, is a mining town in decline, but its residents are worth rooting for. When middle-aged Virgil, the town clerk, drives his car into Lake Superior, he emerges a changed man. No longer will he shy away from confrontation or accept the apparently doomed fate of the classic movie theatre he has poured his heart into. Virgil’s new roommate is a quirky Norwegian whose missing son abandoned the woman Virgil loves. As their stories twist and twine together, readers will be utterly charmed by the town’s unusual, lovable inhabitants.

    The Kennedy Debutante, by Kerri Maher
    This well-researched, compelling debut historical puts the spotlight on Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, a lesser-known figure from the famous family, as she navigates London society in the late 1930s. Her love for Billy Hartington, the future Duke of Devonshire, proves complicated because of his family’s religion (Hartington is Protestant, and the Kennedys are Catholic) but those problems pale in comparison to the war that swiftly engulfs both sides of the Atlantic. Kick throws herself into the conflict as a journalist and Red Cross volunteer, hoping beyond hope that her path will cross again with Billy’s. Readers will hope so, too.

    The post October’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 2:00 pm on 2018/09/04 Permalink
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    September’s Best New Fiction 

    As summer bids us farewell and vacation time winds down, what could be better than curling up with a transportive book? Whether you’re in the mood for 1940s Britain, 1970s Argentina, 1990s Paris, or current-day America with all its rapid-fire twists and turns, September’s best new novels will enthrall you. Fascinating love stories, daring tales of espionage, and a new, female-driven perspective of Homer’s Iliad await.

    Hippie, by Paulo Coelho (translated by M.B. Becker)
    Anti-authoritarian protestors of 2018 will enjoy this look at a previous generation of freedom seekers and demonstrators. Brazilian author Coelho—whose groundbreaking work The Alchemist celebrated its 30th anniversary this year—draws from his real-life experiences to present an authentic journey of self-discovery set in South America and Europe in the early 1970s. From Peru, Chile, and Argentina through Amsterdam and Kathmandu, young Paulo, an aspiring writer, and his Dutch lover Karla travel via the Magic Bus, learning about themselves and their fellow passengers in what promises to be an immersive examination of original hippie culture.

    Sea Prayer, by Khaled Hosseini
    This timely, heartfelt illustrated novel, the proceeds of which will go to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), depicts the hopes and fears of a father for his young son. As the duo waits for the boat that will take them on a harrowing escape from war-torn Syria, the father composes a letter to his sleeping child, detailing the lives they once lived in their home village of Homs. Intended for all ages, it’s a good choice for parents who want to explain the refugee crisis to their kids.

    Transcription, by Kate Atkinson
    Historical spy fiction at its finest, Transcription revolves around the mysterious choices made by Juliet, a teenager recruited by MI5 in 1940. Tasked with transcribing the clandestine meetings between a double agent and British Nazi sympathizers, Juliet believes her work is finished once the war ends. But ten years later her past returns, demanding answers about the role she really played serving justice to turncoats. Fans of Atkinson’s Life After Life  (i.e., everyone) will devour this suspenseful story.

    Katerina, by James Frey
    Toggling between Paris in the early ’90s and modern-day L.A., this love story/addiction parable seems to parallel some of the more controversial aspects of Frey’s real life. As a young American living in France, eager to write books that matter, Jay scrounges and scrimps and deals drugs alongside his sexy model muse. Twenty-five years later, now a famous author, he receives a message—possibly from said ex—that throws his world off-kilter. Will revisiting their passionate struggles ignite Jay’s creativity?

    Labyrinth of the Spirits, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    The fourth and final installment of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series (which began with The Shadow of the Wind) centers on Alicia Gris, orphaned by the Spanish Civil War as a child. Now nearly thirty, and working for Madrid’s secret police, she’s entrusted with locating a government official who seems to have vanished. Solving the mystery brings her into contact with friends of her parents and proves Franco’s regime was even more corrupt than previously understood. As with the earlier books in the tetralogy, Zafon continues to lavish love (and plot points) on books, those who love them, those who write them, and those who sell them. A literary feast. 

    Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart
    Combining his trademark slapstick wit with a Greyhound bus road trip through the south and southwest, Shteyngart spins a tale set in right-this-second America, highlighting its surreal beauty and horror. Readers may not expect to root for a timepiece-obsessed hedge fund manager who abandons his American Indian wife and their autistic son for greener pastures, but watching Barry Cohen flail through his decisions in an attempt to outlast and outrun them proves satirical humor may be the best medicine in a society gone mad.

    The Silence of the Girls, by Pat Barker
    Previous Iliad / Odyssey retellings include Ransom, by David Malouf; The Song of Achilles, by Madeline Miller; and, of course Ulysses, by James Joyce. What makes Silence unique is that it focuses on the female prisoners held in Greece during the last days of the Trojan War. Briseis, the former queen of Lyrnessus, becomes Achilles’s concubine after he slaughters her family and lays waste to her city, but her struggles don’t end there; soon, Agamemnon demands that Achilles hand Briseis over to him, which changes the entire direction of the war. Barker is a master of wartime narratives, having won the Booker Prize for The Ghost Road, set during World War I.

    The post September’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:30 pm on 2018/08/28 Permalink
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    September’s Best Thrillers 

    Juror #3, by James Patterson and Nancy Allen
    Paterson, perhaps the world’s most successful and prolific thriller writer, teams up with Allen, a former attorney and seasoned writer to tell the story of Ruby Bozarth. Ruby is new to the Mississippi bar and the town of Rosedale, but she’s barely got time to find her bearings when she’s assigned to a sensational case. A rich girl is dead and a college football star stands accused, and the prosecutor and judge think Ruby’s inexperience will let them ram through a quick conviction. Ruby’s determined to prove them wrong, and with a little help from a well-armed fellow attorney and a short order cook with a lot of secrets she mounts a defense. But Ruby begins to suspect the biggest obstacle to justice might just be the jurors on the case, who have plenty of secrets of their own.

    Shadow Tyrants, by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
    Cussler teams up with engineer and author Morrison again for the 13th Oregon Files adventure, which finds a mysterious group known as the Nine Unknown seeking to use ancient technology and knowledge to take control of the world for its own good. One member of the Nine, Romir Malik, dissents, however, convinced that the project—code-named Colossus—will destroy humanity instead. It’s once again up to The Corporation and the crew of the Oregon to put the deceptively-weathered high-tech ship on the front lines in order to save the world, as Malik’s solution is to use a network of killer satellites to destroy Colossus, a cure that might be just as bad as the disease.

    Lies, by T.M. Logan
    Logan’s debut begins with an innocent impulse. Joe Lynch and his son William are driving in North London when William sees his mother’s car and insists they surprise her. Joe follows Melissa to a hotel, where he watches her argue with her best friend’s husband, the wealthy Ben Delaney. Before he can confront her, Melissa drives off, so Joe confronts Ben instead, getting into a fight that ends with his phone missing and Ben unconscious. Joe leaves; when he comes back for his phone everything is gone. Melissa denies an affair, but when Ben is supposedly murdered her lie is revealed, and Joe finds himself framed for a murder he knows is impossible—because he knows Ben is alive. Behind the mystery is the real question: just how long has Melissa been lying—and why?

    Cross Her Heart, by Sarah Pinborough
    In Pinborough’s tense new book, Lisa is a tightly-wound overprotective mother. Her daughter Ava is a champion athlete who’s tired of being protected, and sneaking around with her first boyfriend behind Lisa’s back and communicating with a mysterious man online. Marilyn is Lisa’s bestie pushing her to ‛get back out there.’ But Lisa has secrets that have taught her to be careful, and when she drops her guard and lets her photo be taken when Ava is hailed a hero in the press, those secrets come crashing down on her, threatening her safety and her relationship with her daughter. She and Marilyn have to push through their own problems and join forces in order to save Ava from the past which has come back in terrifying force.

    The Labyrinth of the Spirits, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    Bestselling Zafón offers up the fourth and final entry in his Cemetery of Forgotten Books series, catching up with the characters from the first three as they make their way under the repressive rule of Francisco Franco from the late 1930s to the 1970s. But the focus is on Alicia Gris, who survives a bombing as a little girl and carries the scars into adulthood as she works for the secret police as an investigator. Her final case involves the disappearance of the country’s Minister of Culture, Mauricio Valls. A rare book is her first clue in an investigation that begins to reveal the depth of cruelty and violence that Franco’s regime inflicted on the country—a truth so dangerous to the powers that be that Alicia’s soon has to make a choice: risk her life by pursuing the truth, or allow herself to be intimidated into silence.

    When the Lights Go Out, by Mary Kubica
    Jessie Sloane is 17 when her mother, Eden, passes away. Grieving and suffering from insomnia, Jessie decides to sell the house and move on to community college. But she discovers that 17 years ago someone filed a death certificate in her name, and now she has no official identity. As Jessie’s sleepless nights melt into a timeless nightmare, Eden’s heartbreaking story comes to the forefront. Two decades before, she and Aaron were in love and desperately wanted children, but couldn’t conceive. Eden’s obsession with having a child slowly transforms into a frightening compulsion, driving Aaron away. Separated by decades, a mother and a daughter both go down dark paths—and reach shocking conclusions.

    Leave No Trace, by Mindy Mejia
    Two fascinating characters collide in Mejia’s newest thriller. Maya Stark is a young speech therapist pushed by her former psychiatrist to take on a challenging case she doesn’t feel ready for. Lucas Blackthorn is a violent, mute man who’d been presumed dead for years after his father took him into the vast wilderness of Boundary Waters—until he was arrested after a botched robbery. Now Lucas wants nothing more than to escape back to the wilderness and tend to his father, and Maya finds herself being drawn to his perspective so strongly she makes decisions that are more than just ethically dubious—they might be extremely dangerous as well. As her secrets are revealed, Maya becomes increasingly determined to help Lucas no matter the cost.

    The Ancient Nine, by Ian K. Smith
    Smith’s followup to his debut, The Blackbird Papers, is a behind-the-scenes glimpse at Harvard’s tony secret clubs that drips with tension and bulges with secrets. In 1988, Spenser Collins is a champion African-American swimmer who gets a prestigious invitation to join Harvard’s Delphic Club. Intrigued by the idea of connecting with the elite, he begins to investigate the club’s history, discovering not only a mysterious disappearance by a student named Erasmus Abbott who broke into the club in 1927, never to be seen again, but also the existence of a secret club-within-the club known as the Ancient Nine. As Collins digs deeper he learns more and more about this secretive and powerful group—and about their dangerous secret agenda.

    Nomad, by James Swallow
    In Swallow’s newest surefire bestseller, Marc Dane is an MI6 field agent who’s very happy working the computers, far from the grisly action. When his entire team is wiped out and he’s framed for their deaths, he has little choice but to head directly into danger. Labeled a traitor, Dane makes contact with the Rubicon Group and their agent Lucy Keyes, ex-U.S. Army and exactly the sort of skilled agent Dane needs to help him clear his name. Their investigation reveals a historic terrorist plot that could result in the worst attack ever known—and none of the world’s intelligence agencies are looking at the right information to stop it. Dane and Keyes will have to put their own needs aside and risk everything to save the world.

    The post September’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 2:00 pm on 2018/08/01 Permalink
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    August’s Best New Fiction 

    This month’s best new work includes the second book of the Half-Drowned King Viking fantasy trilogy, a portrait of a Midwest town in decline, a debut roman à clef by an Iraq veteran currently imprisoned for bank robbery, and a historical about the Black Plague. And for lighter, contemporary reads, enjoy a sorority-set drama, a romance in Paris gone wrong, and an octogenarian-led cozy mystery. 

    The Masterpiece, by Fiona Davis
    In 1928, Clara Darden struggles against the restraints of the era as the lone female teacher at New York City’s Grand Central School of Art, housed in the majestic terminal of the same name. After the Great Depression hits, her career in illustration disappears, as does Clara. Fast-forward to the 1970s, when divorcée Virginia Clay takes a job at Grand Central, intrigued by the abandoned art studio there, as well as a painting she discovers—a painting that may shed light on Clara’s mysterious fate fifty years prior.

    Rush, by Lisa Patton
    Yankee Doodle Dixie author Patton has written another entertaining, Southern-set contemporary, this time pulling back the curtain on the secret lives of sorority sisters at Ole Miss. Cali Watkins hopes to earn a place with the elite Alpha Delta girls, but lacks the right pedigree and fears a long-buried family secret will tank her chances. The Advisory Board members have more power than sense, but the girls rise up against them when a beloved house staff member at Alpha Delta Beta is denied a promotion.

    Ohio, by Stephen Markley
    A searing debut about one evening in the summer of 2013, in which four ex-classmates who came of age during 9/11 reunite in New Canaan, Ohio, a town marked and marred by decline. From the opioid crises to the Great Recession to the never-ending wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, these Midwesterners have been affected by it all, and each seek closure from their painful pasts in this beautiful, sad, contemplative study of a rust belt town that has been hollowed out.

    The Sea Queen, by Linnea Hartsuyker
    Last summer kicked off the Half-Drowned King trilogy, a 9th-century Viking fantasy based on historical events and overflowing with political machinations and violent battles. In the new installment, six years have passed for minor king Ragnvald and his sister Svanhild, the titular Sea Queen. Their separation has evolved into opposition: While Ragnvald dedicates his life to the unification of Norway under Harald’s command, Svanhild marries the leader of the resistance and displays remarkable strength as a maritime warrior in her own right. 

    The Last Hours, by Minette Walters
    While her husband is away, a woman educated by nuns in 1348 England uses her smarts and intuition to hold the line against the Black Death when it arrives in the town of Develish. Having quarantined herself, her cruel teenage daughter, and her serfs in her moat-surrounded house, Lady Anne denies her own husband entry, correctly fearing he has brought the plague home with him. Her decision does not go over well with her progeny, Lady Eleanor, who harbors a sadistic streak.

    Three Things About Elsie, by Joanna Cannon
    A lifelong friendship between two women forms the heart of this mystery set in an assisted living facility. Our firmly independent octogenarian narrator, Florence, provides sharp commentary but finds it difficult to communicate with others, fearful her memory is failing. With a new arrival, who strongly resembles a frightening figure from Florence’s past, Florence dedicates herself to uncovering the hows and whys of the man’s reappearance. Shifting perceptions provide a bittersweet, suspenseful, and emotionally cathartic reading experience. 

    If You Leave Me, by Crystal Hana Kim
    Against the backdrop of the Korean War and its aftermath, a young woman desperate to provide for her invalid younger brother and widowed mother must choose between two cousins who love her. One is her childhood sweetheart, while the other has the financial stability necessary to save her family. A memorable, heartwrenching debut with multiple POVs that will appeal to fans of Samuel Park’s This Burns My Heart.

    Bad Man, by Dathan Auerbach
    Auerbach got his start terrifying Redditors on their NoSleep short story forum, and it’s easy to see why he proved so popular there. His second full-length novel tells the harrowing story of a young man from North Florida drowning in guilt over the role he played in his three-year-old brother’s disappearance. Five years later, now twenty, Ben decides to take a job stocking groceries at the very store where little Eric vanished. Will he find answers in this oddly creepy, disconcerting milieu, even when the local authorities could not? 

    Cherry, by Nico Walker
    PTSD, heroin addiction, bank robbing, and young-love-turned-bleak-survival are the themes of this breakneck debut by an author well-versed in all four topics. As a medic in Iraq, and a veteran of 250 combat missions, Walker returned home to find his memories incapacitating him; in a parallel to combat, the adrenaline rush he got while committing crimes was the only time he felt calm. A blisteringly authentic and timely work is the result.

    Goodbye Paris, by Anstey Harris
    When her relationship with David (who has a wife and family) comes to a difficult and public end in Paris, thirtysomething Grace Atherton is left to pick up the pieces back home in Kent, where she runs a shop making violins and cellos. Her own burgeoning career in music was derailed decades ago, and truly moving on from her broken relationship may require a hard look at the painful secrets she has been keeping from that time. Luckily, she’ll have help from people in her community, including a young shop clerk and a wise, older customer.

    The post August’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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