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  • Jeff Somers 6:00 pm on 2019/05/31 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , , ,   

    June’s Best Thrillers 


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    This month’s best thrillers include a new story featuring genius FBI agent Emily Dockery from James Patterson and David Ellis, the latest globe-trotting Scot Harvath twister from Brad Thor, and the newest brain-bending work from Blake Crouch.

    Unsolved, by James Patterson and David Ellis
    James Patterson and David Ellis delivery the sequel to Invisible, which introduced the obsessive, genius FBI researcher Emily Dockery. Emily notices things others miss, and it has made her reputation in the bureau. Now, she’s seeing a string of murders across the country—deaths that appear to be accidental, and which seem to have no connection to one another. Whoever’s orchestrating them seems to know what Emily is thinking, and keeps one step ahead of her as she works the case hard. Meanwhile, Emily’s ex-fiancee and reluctant partner, Special Agent Harrison “Books” Bookman, suspects treason within the Bureau—and hasn’t ruled out Emily herself as the culprit.

    Backlash, by Brad Thor
    The 18th Scot Harvath novel finds the legendary operative in the most desperate position of his life. Harvath is a dangerous man; a former Navy SEAL who graduated from a stint in the Secret Service to leading the top secret Apex Project. He’s charged with defending his country by any means necessary, and over the course of 17 books he’s proved he’s a patriot—and he’s a bad person to cross. The lone survivor of an attack that downs his plane behind enemy lines, with no support or equipment, Harvath must find a way to survive using just his brains and his experience as he claws his way to getting revenge on those who would dare attack everything he loves. This white-knuckle adventure will please longtime Harvath fans and introduce new readers to one of the best thriller characters around.

    Tom Clancy: Enemy Contact, by Mike Maden
    Jack Ryan Jr. continues to honor his father’s legacy in his latest tense political adventure. Someone’s selling out the CIA, auctioning its deepest secrets to the highest bidder and destabilizing the entire intelligence system of the Western world. After barely surviving a disastrous mission in Poland, Jack Jr. is called to the bedside of a friend dying of cancer and asked for one final favor: to scatter the man’s ashes on a specific hillside in Chile. Jack agrees, thinking it simply as a way to honor a friend—but he’s almost immediately contacted by a former army ranger and warned not to go through with it. Ever his father’s son, Jack does anyway, setting off a chain of events that leaves him isolated, in grave danger, and within spitting distance of discovering the identity of the mole in the CIA.

    Skin Game, by Stuart Woods and Parnell Hall
    Stuart Woods and co-writer Parnell Hall’s Teddy Faye returns. The ex-CIA agent is ordered by the agency’s chief to drop everything and head to Paris in order to ferret out a mole. Faye obeys, attracting the attention of Fahd Kassin, a Syrian tough with a penchant for assassination. Teddy reaches Paris, but before he can begin his investigation he finds himself going undercover to track Kassin, who has arrived in the city to attend a rare animal convention. As Teddy gets the better of his enemies in increasingly entertaining ways, he stumbles onto a plot that threatens more than just one ex-CIA operative.

    Recursion, by Blake Crouch
    At the start of Blake Crouch’s latest mind-bending high-concept sci-fi thriller, New York City detective Barry Sutton begins to encounter people suffering from False Memory Syndrome—a condition where they “remember” lives they never lived, and suffer emotionally due to tragedies they never actually experienced. A year earlier, a brilliant neuroscientist named Helena Smith accepts funding from a mega-wealthy sponsor in order to create a device that can preserve memories to be re-experienced whenever desired—but it also allows people to literally enter those memories, changing everything. As the disorder spreads throughout the city, reality itself is threatened; who can say what is real when you can’t trust your own memories? As Harry connects with Helena and they realize her research is destabilizing the world, the two join forces to find a way to save the human race from this threat from within.

    The Last House Guest, by Megan Miranda
    Littleport, Maine is the sort of town where life is split down the middle between the summer tourists and the year-round residents who serve their wealthier part-time neighbors. The divide is so strong that the friendship that springs up between visiting Sadie Loman and townie Avery Greer is remarkable, both for its authenticity and its longevity—every year Sadie visits with her family, and for the summer, she and Avery are a team. Until the summer Sadie turns up dead. Her death is officially ruled a suicide, but Avery can’t accept that—and the more she digs into her friend’s death, the more convinced she is that she shouldn’t, as forces in the community seem to be arrayed against her lonely quest for the truth.

    What books look thrilling to you in June?

    The post June’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Sarah Skilton 4:00 pm on 2019/05/01 Permalink
    Tags: armando lucase correa, ask again yes, blessing in disguise, bnstorefront-bookstore, , , , , , , , , light from other stars, liv constantine, mary beth keane, , queen bee, resistance women, , , the daughter's tale, , the last time i saw you, ,   

    May’s Best New Fiction 


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    This month kicks off summer beach read season and we couldn’t be more delighted by the historical fiction and sweeping family sagas in our TBR pile. Whether you’re in the mood for a lowcountry tale of two sisters intrigued by the same widow, a murder mystery in high society Baltimore, or tales of resistance in Nazi Germany, there’s plenty to keep you company while the waves crash against the shore.

    The Guest Book, by Sarah Blake
    Following the success of The Postmistress, Sarah Blake is back with a gripping new historical novel that depicts three generations of a privileged American family. The Miltons embody the American dream in a manner not seen since the Gettys or Vanderbilts. In the 1930s, they purchased Crockett Island off the coast of Maine as a summertime getaway. Each generation since has enjoyed the secluded, gorgeous setting, but eventually the family wealth dries up and the fate of the homestead rests in the hands of three cousins, each with separate agendas. The island’s origin is steeped in misery—but what, if anything, will the newest generation do to mitigate the sins of the past?

    Queen Bee, by Dorothea Benton Frank
    Fans of Frank will be delighted to re-visit Sullivan’s Island for the author’s twentieth tale, set as always in lowcountry South Carolina. Sibling rivalry rears its head when beekeeper / librarian Holly’s newly separated sister, Leslie, sweeps back into town to wreak havoc. Leslie has set her sights on Holly’s widowed neighbor, Archie, father of two. Problem is, he’s the same man whose young kids Holly has come to view as a key component of her happiness and purpose. Add the sisters’ hypochondriac mother to the mix and you’ve got a warm family saga and pitch-perfect beach read.

    Blessing in Disguise, by Danielle Steel
    If you loved the Mamma Mia films, you’ll devour Steel’s latest in a single weekend. Isabelle McAvoy has loved, lost, and lived to fight another day as the single mother of three daughters. Each daughter has a different father, and the relationships that produced them are as disparate as the circumstances that brought them into Isabelle’s life. From true love matches to ill-advised unions, Isabelle has learned a lot along the way—but it turns out her journey, and that of her daughters, is far from over.

    The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine
    With her thrilling debut, The Last Mrs. Parrish (picked for Reese Witherspoon’s book club), Constantine proved her skill at creating memorably devious characters. Her new novel, a twisty murder mystery set among Baltimore high society, ratchets up the tension even more. On the surface, Doctor Kate English is living an enviable life. She appears to balance a perfect family, inherited wealth, and a fulfilling career. All that changes when her mother is viciously killed and the only woman Kate trusts to solve the crime is her prickly, estranged former friend, Blaire, a woman not known for treading lightly.

    Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane
    Keane’s new book is tender and wise, literary fiction of the highest caliber, and readers will immediately feel pulled in to the story of two families whose lives are forever entwined. As next-door neighbors in a New York suburb, and colleagues at the police department, Francis Gleeson and Brian Stanhope first met in the 1970s. The two men were never exactly friends, but in the ensuing years, their children Peter and Kate grow up together as close as can be. When a shocking act tears the neighbors apart, can either family find a way back from the depths of trauma? Will Peter and Kate’s now-forbidden relationship overcome their parents’ misgivings? Demand this one for your book club: they’ll thank you for it!

    Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini
    This compelling World War II historical is firmly in Chiaverini’s wheelhouse, based on real people and filled with excitement. It’s the early 1930s and Mildred Fish Harnack from Wisconsin is enjoying her new life in Berlin. Recently reunited with her German husband, Arvid, and pursuing a doctorate in American Lit, she finds the cosmopolitan city invigorating and stimulating. When the political tide takes a horrifying turn, she and three other women—Martha Dodd (the US ambassador’s daughter); Greta Lorke (an aspiring playwright); and Sara Weitz (a student)—vow to resist Hitler’s regime, putting their lives and the lives of their loved ones on the line.

    The Daughter’s Tale, by Armando Lucas Correa
    A dual-timeline story presented with realistic and harrowing detail, Tale depicts the escape by Amanda Sternberg from Germany when her husband is killed in a prison camp in 1939. Though Amanda sends her eldest daughter to Cuba to live with an uncle, she keeps her youngest daughter, Lina, by her side to face an uncertain future in France. Present-day Lina, now called Elise Duval and living in the U.S., is stunned to discover a series of letters written by her mother that shed light on the past, and the choices Amanda was once forced to make.

    The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna, by Juliet Grames
    This moving debut set in Connecticut and Calabria, Italy, finds the immigrant Fortuna sisters, Stella and Tina, struggling to grow up under the thumb of a domineering father. Did I mention Stella has a penchant for near-death experiences and an independent streak a mile wide? She’ll also do anything to keep her younger sister Tina safe from pain or hardship, which makes their eventual estrangement all the more mysterious. This has the potential to be an excellent read-alike for Kate Atkinson’s Life After Lifewhile also being wholly original.

    Light From Other Stars, by Erika Swyler
    A perfect book for fans of Interstellar, this sci-fi drama, grounded in realism and the bonds of family, follows 12-year-old Nedda and her quest to become an astronaut. Nedda’s father, a former physicist for NASA, is driven to prolong Nedda’s childhood by slowing it down via entropy. As a result, he subsumes the entire town of Easter, Florida, into a sinkhole in time. Yet years later, Nedda finds herself aboard a vessel in space, and it may be Nedda’s mother and grandmother who are responsible for Nedda’s success. This looks to be a mesmerizing and beautiful coming of age story about dreams fulfilled and paths not taken.

    How Not to Die Alone, by Richard Roper
    Years ago, Andrew made a split-second decision to pretend he was a family man in order to secure a job. His seemingly benign lie has come back to haunt him when a new employee and mentee, Peggy, enters his life and his heart. Like the rest of Andrew’s colleagues, Peggy assumes Andrew is married with two daughters, so how can he come clean after all this time? Each moment of his career feels like a glimpse into his own future; as an administrator in the U.K.’s Death Council, Andrew is responsible for going through the belongings of people who have died alone. If Andrew doesn’t make some changes, he may very well share their fate. Alone promises to be a charming and poignant read.

    The post May’s Best New Fiction appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 5:00 pm on 2019/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , , cari mora, , ,   

    May’s Best New Thrillers 


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    Our list of the best thrillers out this month is stacked with star authors like Thomas Harris, the father of Hannibal Lecter, who delivers an entirely new story of greed and obsession; Clive Cussler, who returns with another Fargo Adventures story; and Jeffery Deaver, who is launching a taut new series. May just got a lot more exciting.

    Cari Mora, by Thomas Harris
    The author of The Silence of the Lambs delivers his first standalone novel in four decades, a tense thrilling with a most unexpectedly dangerous protagonist. It’s the story of Cari Mora, an tenuously legal immigrant working in Miami as the caretaker of a luxurious beach house, having fled violence and brutality in her home country. What Cari doesn’t know is that her life in the U.S. will be no safer: a drug cartel has buried $25 million under the house, and a group of ruthless, driven men seek to claim it. The worst of them, a sadistic fiend named Hans-Peter Schneider, is willing to do whatever it takes to get to the money, but he finds himself distracted with the beautiful Cari, and decides to claim her as part of the fortune. But Schneider soon discovers that Cari has learned how to survive the hard way, and has the skills—and the desperate drive to survive—to match his own perverse desires.

    The Oracle, by Clive Cussler and Robin Burcell
    Cussler and Burcell’s treasure hunting couple Sam and Remi Fargo have never let a little thing like the threat of a supernatural curse prevent them from tracking down the treasures of the ancient world, and they aren’t about to start now. In the 6th century, a Vandal kingdom in Africa collapsed when a bundle of sacred scrolls were stolen and a curse was laid upon the king. The scrolls were never found, and the Fargos are determined to recover them. Delaying their quest is the theft of the humanitarian supplies being delivered by their charity, which forces them to travel to Africa to ensure replacements get to their intended destination. But the couple themselves are next assailed by thieves, and Remi is taken hostage. As Sam desperately searches for her, he discovers an apparent connection between the kidnapping and the ancient scrolls. The Fargos will be tested to their limits and beyond as they struggle to survive their 11th adventure..

    The Night Window, by Dean Koontz
    Five books into Koontz’s fast-paced techno-thriller series, Jane Hawk’s struggle against the Techno Arcadians—a shadowy cabal using secret nanotech implants to control minds and souls—is at its most desperate point. Having hidden her son Travis with allies, she teams up with former FBI agent Vikram Rangnekar and adopts a new identity in order to continue the fight. Vikram, a skilled computer hacker, has an unrequited crush on Jane, and brings his own problems into the mix in the form of an Arcadian obsessed with his capture. As they work together to find a way to stop the conspiracy, the Arcadians prove just how fearsome they are—some hunt humans for sport, some hunt for Travis in order to secure leverage over Hawk, and all of them are willing to use advanced surveillance technology to control the population and eliminate any threats to their rule.

    The Never Game, by Jeffery Deaver
    Jeffrey Deaver introduces a new protagonist in Colter Shaw, the son of a survivalist who travels the country in a mobile home taking on the search for people who the proper authorities can’t—or won’t—locate. Shaw is in California to search for Sophie Mulliner, who stormed out of her father’s house after an argument and was never seen again. The police think she’s just left town, but Shaw calculates long odds that she’s still alive. He quickly finds clues pointing to an abduction, and realizes the police who missed them were either incompetent or corrupt. When another abduction occurs, and then another, Shaw begins to piece together a connection between the crimes and a shadowy video game—and the uncertain fates of the victims puts a ticking clock on his efforts to track them down and save them from a terrifying fate.

    The Paris Diversion, by Chris Pavone
    Kate Moore appears to be just another young ex-pat in Paris, living comfortably as the wife of her hedge-fund manager husband Dexter. But Kate is much more than that: she’s a CIA agent under cover so deep not even Dexter knows their marriage is a sham. Despite all that, Kate has grown bored with her pretend-small life, but her malaise is shattered by two events: a young jihadi straps a bomb to himself and stands in front of the Louvre, and one of her husband’s wealthiest clients vanishes right before making announcing a major deal. Kate only gets more excited as the connections between the two events become clear, and relishes finally being able to dive into her real work—activating hidden support networks and chasing down leads in order to solve an increasingly twisted mystery.

    Vessel, by Lisa A. Nichols
    When the space mission onboard the Sagittarius ends in calamity, Catherine Wells is the only survivor to return to Earth, where she is met with suspicion. Catherine herself isn’t quite sure what to think; after nine years in space her personal relationships are already strained, and she’s experiencing memory loss, blackouts, and violent mood swings that make reconnecting with her family back on Earth enough of a challenge, never mind piecing together the events of a disaster in space. Cal Morganson, who is leading the follow-up mission and thus has a vested interest in figuring out what went wrong the first time, begins working directly with Catherine to try and get to the bottom of the mystery. It’s a story of confused identity and desperate survival—Blake Crouch’s Dark Matter meets Andy Weir’s The Martian.

    Reaper: Threat Zero—A Sniper Novel, by Nicholas Irving with A. J. Tata
    In the next thriller from bestselling author Nicholas Irving and A.J. Tata, a retired U.S. special operations forces sniper, decorated ex-military sniper Vick Harwood returns in an explosive story that begins when a caravan of vehicles bringing the families of U.S. cabinet members to Camp David is ambushed and its passengers are brutally murdered. Harwood watches the live feed of footage captured by a fellow Ranger, Sammie Samuelson, who confesses to the attack and commits suicide live on the internet. Harwood investigates with the help of an FBI agent, Valerie Hinojosa, and soon uncovers a terrorist plot, leading to his recruitment into Team Valid, an elite team directed by the president to extract revenge on the terrorists behind the heinous act by tracking down their families and executing them. But as Harwood and his team travel the world in search of their targets, he discovers evidence that suggests nothing is as it seems, and soon, he is fighting not only for justice, but to defend his own closely held moral code.

    What new books are thrilling you this month?

    The post May’s Best New Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Ross Johnson 5:00 pm on 2019/04/29 Permalink
    Tags: , bnstorefront-bookstore, ,   

    May’s Best Biographies & Memoirs 


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    Sea Stories: My Life in Special Operations, by William H. McRaven
    This retired Navy admiral’s earliest memories place him at American Officers’ Club in France among Allied officers recounting their adventures in WWII. The son of a career Air Force officer, William McRaven followed his father into the United States military and throughout his career was involved in some of the highest profile moments in modern military history, including the capture of Saddam Hussein, the rescue of Captain Richard Phillips, and the raid that ended with the death of Osama bin Laden. The Navy SEAL and Special Operations Forces commander’s memoir is full of fascinating stories.

    Howard Stern Comes Again, by Howard Stern
    At some point, the king of shock jocks became true radio royalty with a career spanning over four decades and success across multiple mediums. His first book became a hit movie, and his second was also a bestseller—but that was over 20 years ago, and much has changed in the life of Howard Stern since, from his departure from terrestrial radio, to his mega-bucks deal with SiriusXM, to shakeups in his personal life. There’s no doubt that he has plenty of new stories to tell about his life, his celebrity encounters, and his perspective on the ever-changing realities of the radio business.

    Every Man a Hero: A Memoir of D-Day, the First Wave at Omaha Beach, and a World at War, by Ray Lambert and Jim DeFelice
    The number of individuals who can recount firsthand their experiences during World War II is sadly dwindling, but that doesn’t mean there are no new stories left to tell. Ninety-eight-year-old Ray Lambert was a combat medic and among the first wave of Allied soldiers to land at Omaha Beach on D-Day. Lambert grew up on a farm in Alabama during the Great Depression before he and his brother enlisted for service that took them to some of the war’s most important and harrowing battles. Timed for the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landing, Lambert’s memoir is a powerful addition to the library of works about the greatest and most terrible conflict in history.

    All the Way: Football, Fame, and Redemption (B&N Exclusive Edition), by Joe Namath with Don Yaeger
    Fifty years after Namath lead the New York Jets to a Super Bowl victory against the Baltimore Colts, the icon tells the story of his journey from small-town Pennsylvania kid to sports legend. Across half a century, Namath spent time at the height of celebrity, but also dealt with debilitating injuries that saw him addicted to painkillers and alcohol. Here, he reveals that the charmed life he appeared to lead masked real challenges. It’s a story of incredible triumphs, incredible lows, and, ultimately, redemption.

    Where the Light Enters: Building a Family, Discovering Myself, by Jill Biden
    The 23-year-old Jill Jacobs was a divorced teacher coming off of a rebellious childhood when she first met Joe Biden, a father of two and a widower. Though the two hit it off immediately, she was reluctant to commit to the boisterous extended Biden family, as well as to take on the role of surrogate mother for Joe’s children. Of course, we know the relationship worked—the two married, and Jill continued her teaching career in some form right up until the 2008 presidential election that saw her take on the role of second lady. With a new election cycle heating up, her name is now back in the headlines, and in this memoir of the life of a family in the spotlight.

    Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee, by Casey Cep
    In the 1970s, one Reverend Willie Maxwell was accused of killing five of his family members for insurance money. After he had given the eulogy for the stepdaughter he’d allegedly murdered, he himself was shot by another relative. The same lawyer who defended the Reverend secured an acquittal for the vigilante. No one was more intrigued by the sordid story than Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, who spent years working on a never-published true crime work to rival that of her friend Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. In this fascinating new book, Casey Cep explores both the original crime and Lee’s obsessive, ultimately futile work to craft it into a powerful work of non-fiction.

    Anthony Bourdain Remembered
    Bourdain’s death last year brought about an outpouring of love and affection from his most devoted fans, not to mention the casual viewers of his travel and food programs. If the tributes shared a theme, it was honoring the late master chef’s belief that the world would be a better place if we all spent more time walking in the shoes of others, and maybe trying a little of their food. It’s a valuable message, and this reminiscence celebrates Bourdain’s life with anecdotes from fans, friends, chefs, and luminaries like Barack Obama, Ken Burns, and Questlove.

    Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination, by Brian Jay Jones
    Everyone knows Dr. Seuss, but Theodor Geisel is another matter entirely. The author, cartoonist, and animator produced some of the most popular and bestselling children’s books of all time, but began his career as a left-leaning political cartoonist during World War II, at first decrying non-interventionists and then producing posters and films to benefit the war effort directly.  The self-described subversive never lost his strong point of view, creating works for kids that eschewed traditional morals but which still carried messages. It worked, and this book proves his life was as fascinating and unique as his creations.

    Whose story inspires you?

    The post May’s Best Biographies & Memoirs appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 9:00 pm on 2019/04/01 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-bookstore, , , , ,   

    April’s Best Thrillers 


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    Redemption, by David Baldacci
    Amos Decker, the Memory Man with the perfect recall, returns in more ways than one in Baldacci’s latest as he heads back to his hometown of Burlington, Ohio, with FBI partner Alex Jamison along for the ride. There, Decker meets Meryl Hawkins, the first person he ever arrested. Hawkins was convicted of murder and has spent years in jail, emerging ravaged by time and illness. Even as he’s dying, Hawkins insists to Decker that he didn’t commit those crimes, and Decker is shaken by the possibility that he made a youthful mistake that sent an innocent man to jail. Digging into the case, Decker discovers a connection to another crime—one that hasn’t been committed yet, and which he might be able to put a stop to if he can solve the puzzle in time.

    The 18th Abduction, by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
    Three teachers head out for a fun night in San Francisco after class, but their adventure turns deadly when the trio is abducted, tortured, and murdered. When one of their bodies is discovered, Detective Lindsay Boxer catches the case that has the city worrying over the safety and security of the entire school system. Lindsay turns to her best friend, investigative reporter Cindy Thomas, for help, and the fresh perspective reveals unexpected facets of the victims. The Women’s Murder Club must work together like never before to protect their families and their city from a terrifying threat.

    Neon Prey, by John Sandford
    When Howell Paine fails to pay back the money he owes loan shark Roger Smith, Smith sends violent thug Clayton Deese to punish him. But Paine fights back with an unexpected ferocity, and Deese is jammed up on racketeering charges. When Deese escapes his ankle bracelet and investigators discover partially-eaten bodies buried in his backyard, Lucas Davenport takes an interest and begins tracking the killer and the brutal gang he travels with as they journey across the country, pulling jobs to fuel their gambling and drug use. Worried that Deese is an unstable source of dire secrets that could ruin him, Smith decides he has to go, setting up a tense three-way game of cat-and-mouse Davenport fans are sure to love.

    I Know Who You Are: A Novel, by Alice Feeney
    When actress Aimee Sinclair’s husband Ben disappears from their London townhouse the day after a terrible fight, the police center their investigation on her. After security footage of a woman that looks a lot like Aimee cleaning out their bank accounts turns up, they suspect she’s hiding something—and she is, though it’s not what the police think. Aimee definitely has a secret, one she’s now convinced someone knows and is using against her. Juggling the investigation and an audition for a high-profile role in a disturbing, career-making film, Aimee slowly reveals her shocking past even as the present-day mystery develops, one unexpected clue at a time.

    Collusion, by Newt Gingrich and Pete Earley
    With a title guaranteed to catch your eye, long-time political insider Gingrich and co-writer Earley deliver an action thriller ripped from the headlines. When the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine is killed by terrorists, disgraced former Navy SEAL Brett Garrett is tasked with conveying an encrypted thumb drive to the president himself. The drive reveals that a high-ranking member of the Russian government intends to defect, and it falls on Garrett and the FBI’s expert on domestic terrorism, Valerie Mayberry, to bring him in and prevent a deadly poison attack on American soil. Standing in his way: corrupt politics, liberal protesters, and deadly enemies.

    Saving Meghan, by D.J. Palmer
    Meghan Gerard was once a vibrant star athlete with a bright future. But by age 15, she’s frequently with a broad range of mysterious ailments that her medical team can’t seem to explain. On the surface, her wealthy parents are devoted to her, especially her mother, Becky, but when Meghan takes a turn for the worse, the doctors begin to openly wonder if Becky is perhaps keeping Meghan sick in a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Becky finds herself racing against time to prove that Meghan is truly sick and in desperate need of help—and she’ll have to face her own dark history and family secrets along the way.

    The Mother-in-Law, by Sally Hepworth
    This tense thriller will appeal to anyone who’s ever had a less-than-friendly relationship with the in-laws. When Lucy marries Ollie, everything is perfect—except for her relationship with his mother Diana. A beloved member of the community, Diana is faultlessly polite and outwardly kind, but Lucy knows the woman doesn’t like her. When Diana appears to kill herself, leaving a note behind stating that she doesn’t want to live through the breast cancer she’s been diagnosed with, everyone is shocked. But what’s more shocking is the autopsy that finds no cancer whatsoever—but plenty of evidence that Diana was murdered. The revelation of changes to her will mean everyone in the family suddenly has a motive, and as the truth comes out, one thing is certain: the family will never be the same.

    True Believer, by Jack Carr
    Carr follows up The Terminal List with a thriller with an explosive twist: the most famous domestic terrorist in American history, former Navy SEAL James Reece, isn’t punished for pursuing his violent revenge on those who killed his family and colleagues. Instead, he’s recruited by the CIA as the one man who can turn the Iraqi commando coordinating a series of devastating attacks that have sowed chaos around the world. Offering Reece a pardon for himself and immunity for those who have protected him, the agency convinces a reluctant Reece to take on the job, setting him on a globe-trotting course that exposes a far-reaching conspiracy.

    The Invited, by Jennifer McMahon
    Helen and Nate Wetherell take the plunge and purchase 44 acres of land in rural Vermont on which to build their dream home. After they move into a trailer on the property and begin planning the project, however, they learn that a century before, a woman named Hattie Breckenridge was hanged as a witch on their property. Soon after, ominous things begin to happen. Pragmatic acience teacher Nate blames the locals who want them to stop building and go away, but as Helen investigates the history of the property, she becomes engrossed in Hattie’s legend—and convinced supernatural forces may be at work.

    The post April’s Best Thrillers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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