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  • Joel Cunningham 7:00 am on 2019/09/20 Permalink
    Tags: B&N   

    Celebrate British TV at Barnes & Noble 


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    With the Downton Abbey movie arriving in theaters, Barnes & Noble is throwing a weekend long celebration of our favorite British TV series!

    This weekend,  September 20-22, you can get 50% off all British TV Shows DVDs & Blu-rays (both in stores & online)! Browse the complete selection here.

    If you’re looking to catch up on Downton Abbey, this is also your chance to get an amazing deal Barnes & Noble exclusive boxset featuring the first three seasons for only $19.99—$70 off the regular price!

    We’re also hosting a special sweepstakes: You can enter for a chance to win a free Trip to London (1 winner for a pair of tickets) A 7 Day Tour of England. Enter both in stores and online).

    And there are more special offers in stores only!

    Enter for a chance to win Downton Abbey Complete Collection gift set (one per store) a $199.99 value. Visit a store for the official rules and to learn how to enter.

    You’ll also receive a free Harney & Sons Tall Hot Tea with a the purchase of any British TV DVD or Blu-Ray. If you’re one of the first 25 customers to purchase, you’ll also receive a f
    ree button with the purchase of any Brit TV DVD or Blu-ray!

    British TV Weekend takes place at Barnes & Noble from September 20-22.

    The post Celebrate British TV at Barnes & Noble appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 7:00 am on 2019/09/20 Permalink
    Tags: B&N   

    Celebrate British TV at Barnes & Noble 


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    With the Downton Abbey movie arriving in theaters, Barnes & Noble is throwing a weekend long celebration of our favorite British TV series!

    This weekend,  September 20-22, you can get 50% off all British TV Shows DVDs & Blu-rays (both in stores & online)! Browse the complete selection here.

    If you’re looking to catch up on Downton Abbey, this is also your chance to get an amazing deal Barnes & Noble exclusive boxset featuring the first three seasons for only $19.99—$70 off the regular price!

    We’re also hosting a special sweepstakes: You can enter for a chance to win a free Trip to London (1 winner for a pair of tickets) A 7 Day Tour of England. Enter both in stores and online).

    And there are more special offers in stores only!

    Enter for a chance to win Downton Abbey Complete Collection gift set (one per store) a $199.99 value. Visit a store for the official rules and to learn how to enter.

    You’ll also receive a free Harney & Sons Tall Hot Tea with a the purchase of any British TV DVD or Blu-Ray. If you’re one of the first 25 customers to purchase, you’ll also receive a f
    ree button with the purchase of any Brit TV DVD or Blu-ray!

    British TV Weekend takes place at Barnes & Noble from September 20-22.

    The post Celebrate British TV at Barnes & Noble appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 3:00 pm on 2019/09/09 Permalink
    Tags: , B&N, exclusive, exclusive interview, , inspector gamache series, Interview,   

    An Exclusive Interview with Author Louise Penny, Plus a Behind-the-Scenes Look at A Better Man 


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    Deftly plotted, witty, and atmospheric, filled with memorable characters, and unafraid to confront uncomfortable truths about humanity, Louise Penny’s Chief Inspector Gamache series is a true gift to mystery lovers. Penny was kind enough to answer a few of our burning questions, and to give us a fascinating glimpse of her thoughts during the writing of her latest novel, A Better Man

    The 15th novel in the series finds Gamache taking up the reins in his new position as head of homicide, after his recent demotion from head of the whole force. To make matters even touchier, he’s now working alongside his former subordinate, Jean-Guy Beauvoir, on a new case, that of a woman who has gone missing. Gamache finds himself sympathizing with her agonized father, asking himself what he would do, were he in the man’s shoes; when a body turns up, the question becomes even more urgent, and the answer more unsettling.

    Louise Penny, on A Better Man

    I wanted to give you all a little behind-the-scenes look at what I was thinking when I was writing A Better Man, by showing you a few lines and exactly what was going through my mind. Here are five of my favorite lines from the book, along with my personal annotations.  

    Ruth made a noise that could have been a laugh.  Or indigestion.  

    ‘I’ll tell you what is funny.  You crash and burn trying to do something different, while Armand destroys his career by agreeing to go back and do the same old thing.’ 

    I so enjoy writing Ruth, though it takes a, perversely, delicate touch. She needs to be honest and cranky, often insulting, while not descending into caricature or outright nastiness. Here that ambivalence is illustrated, I hoped, through their inability to know if the noise is amusement or indigestion. Though, once again, she uncomfortably states what most are thinking. 

    ‘Consequences,’ said Gamache. ‘We must always consider the consequences of our actions. Or inaction.” 

    This is an ongoing theme within the books, and with Gamache. Considering the consequences, knowing the consequences, weighing the outcomes….and still deciding to act. It’s one thing to act on instinct, and there’s often rare courage in that—but Armand tries to impress on his people that there’s even more courage in looking without blinking at what their actions might mean. Good and bad. Intended and unintended. He goes on to say that, in his opinion, that’s part of their contract with the Quebec population. That those with a badge and a gun, will have the maturity to think before they act.  

    He left the woods late that afternoon, shattered.  

    And now he was back.  

    A better man?  A bitter man?  

    They were about to find out.   

    The homicide team is about to see Armand Gamache, back at work as their Chief Inspector, for the first time since his suspension and demotion from Chief Superintendent. I loved writing this scene…of his return, and their reaction.  And my reaction, to having him back as head of homicide. Where the whole Three Pines series began. Older. More bruised. Both him, and me. And you too, I suspect. Have the years, the events, the vicissitudes made him, us, bitter or better?   

    ‘I see.’  Gamache lowered his voice, though all could still hear the words.  ‘When I was Chief Superintendent I had a poster framed in my office.  On it were the last words of a favorite poet, Seamus Heaney. Noli Timere.  It’s Latin.  Do you know what it means?’ 

    He looked around the room. 

    ‘Neither did I,’ he admitted, when no one spoke.  ‘I had to look it up. It means, Be Not Afraid.’   

    Not completely coincidentally, I have the same poster in my living room, where I see it every day as I write. I’m looking at it now. Fear is such a thief. If I only did what I was comfortable with, there’d be no books, no marriage, fewer close relationships. Less travel, far fewer, or no, risks. And my life would shrink to nothing. Armand knows that the bravest person in any room is the one who can admit he’s scared sh**less. But does it anyway. Here he’s encouraging a young agent to speak his mind, even though he’s afraid.  

    She also happened to be the chief of the volunteer fire department.  Not because she was a natural leader, but because most villagers would rather run into a burning building or a river in full flood than face Ruth Zardo’s sharp tongue.   

    Ha—I’ve used similar descriptions of Ruth, and once again I hoped to illustrate the contradiction that is Ruth…indeed, that is most of us. The elderly poet could stay home, ignoring whatever natural disaster has cropped up. Instead, she takes on a leadership role, whether her neighbors like it or not. Yet she’s strangely effective, partly because the very thing that makes her almost as terrifying as the catastrophe, makes her uniquely effective. Ruth Zardo never shies away from the truth. From a fight. In this book we see her doing just that, with some great success, and with some terrible result. 

    For more behind-the-scenes insight into some of my favorite lines from all of the books and the stories behind them, check out gamacheseries.com 

    Further conversation with author Louise Penny:

    What was the beginning of your fascination with mysteries?  

    Agatha Christie, of course. It was the first ‘adult’ book my mother and I shared. I will always remember her standing on the landing upstairs, a book in her hand. She looked at it, then at me, and gave it to me saying she’d just finished it, and thought I’d like it too. It was a Christie. A Miss Marple, I think, but can’t remember the exact title. It was thrilling, to share a book with my mother. To have that in common. Something that we shared the rest of her life. When things went bad between us, as they sometimes do between mothers and daughters, our truce sign was asking, “What are you reading?” 

    I went on to discover the Simenon books about Maigret. And the fabulous Josephine Tey, which are more crime novels than murder mysteries.  My favorite is The Franchise Affair.  Her books are gems, crystalline, every word, every phrase has a purpose. 

    How do you sit down and start a new novel? What’s the spark? 

    In The Long Way Home, I quote Robert Frost and a letter he wrote to a friend where he describes his creative process as a poet. And he says that for him, a poem begins as a lump in the throat. For me, each book of mine begins as a lump in the throat. Some emotion that I need to explore. My books are about many things, including, but far from exclusively, a crime. Murder is an act, and a dreadful one.  But I spend a year on each book and it must be about more than a crime. And so each book is inspired by an emotion, a theme, a piece of human nature that puzzles and fascinates.  A question that I do not really know the answer to. Most of my books are inspired by a poem, or even a few lines from a poem. I find a bit of poetry, I write it out on a Post-it, and I stick it on my laptop. So when I inevitably get all lost and confused, I can go back to it and say, ‘That’s what the book’s about.’ 

    What kind of entertainment interests you aside from reading? 

    I love music, and listen to it a lot, when not actually writing.  All sorts of music.  In fact, each book has its own playlist, made up of current favorites.  The one I’m listening to right now has Rag ‘n Bone Man, Bizet, Bach, X Ambassadors, some Gregorian Chants, Crash Test DummiesFlatt&Scruggs, Dire Straits, Leonard Cohen, Cosmo Sheldrake. And more. I also relax in front of the TV.  Mostly HGTV.  Trying to work out which home I’d buy.   

    How much of what you write is influenced by current events, by real people, by real places? And how much is completely invented? 

    People might read the books and think I’m creative, and the fact is I’m not. I just write what I see. And I write what I feel every day.  

    The books are definitely drawn from a whole bunch of things. Absolutely from the Eastern Townships of Quebec. The books are many things, probably least among them crime novels. They are definitely crime fiction, but they are love letters to the place I choose to live. I have never been made to feel a stranger in Knowlton. Michael and I were welcomed and embraced. It feels like there was always a place at the table just waiting for us. Much of my life I wandered, geographically and emotionally. Searching for home. I found it in the Eastern Townships of Quebec. I found it with Michael. I found it buried deep inside myself. And that’s what I write about. The yearning to belong.  The search for home.   

    What’s your daily routine? Can you describe for us a typical day at home?  

    Well, not to be too boring, but I write every day, except when I’m between books. I used to be a night person, as a teen (I guess most of us were). But my first real job was hosting a morning show for CBC Radio in Thunder Bay, Ontario. I had to get up at 4am. A few years of that, and voila. A morning person was created. I no longer get up at 4am, but I am up sometime around 6am.   

    I make coffee, and get to work right away, while fresh. I re-read what I wrote the day before, noodling with it a bit, then press ahead with the new writing.  I set a goal of 1,000 words a day. I’m very disciplined, mostly because I need to be.  All I really want to do is lie on the sofa eating gummy bears and watching HGTV.   

    Though it’s no secret why no reality show follows a writer around. At least not this writer. I essentially go from the dining room table, where I work, to the coffee machine. And back. And I stare into space. A lot. I often think it’s unfair that the creative process and doing nothing look exactly alike.   

    In the afternoons, after I finish writing, I often walk into the village for lunch with a friend. I am, by nature, a bit of a recluse, so I need to work at getting out. Though I love my friends and enjoy time with them.   

    Then I answer emails and do any other work that needs to be done, like interviews etc. Not, perhaps, a hugely exciting life. But it’s perfect for me. And I know how lucky I am. 

    How did you come up with the idea for the village of Three Pines? Is it based on a real place?  

    Three Pines has long been both a setting and a main character in my books. It’s fictional, for sure, but inspired by all sorts of villages. Some in Quebec, some elsewhere in Canada. Some Vermont towns have inspired the books, as well as English villages. Three Pines is an intentionally hyper-ideal village. Beautiful and peaceful. At least on the outside.  It plays into another theme throughout the series, one of duality.  The difference between perception and reality.  Between what we say and what we’re really thinking.  Between the public face and the inner turmoil.   

    I consider the books allegories and Three Pines a state-of-mind. A place we find only when we’re lost.  When we need it.  And not home to everyone.   

    I’ve been lost in my life, and tired of sarcasm and dark cynicism. I’d had too much of that. It drained me. Left me hollow and callow. I needed belonging, and kindness. I needed friendship. A warm hearth on a cold night. That’s Three Pines. But, like Gamache, while it’s good, it isn’t perfect. There’s always a serpent, even in Paradise. A shadow to the light. And that’s what makes Three Pines what it is, and the people who they are 

    What do you think it is about your books that makes them so successful? 

    I think the setting helps. As I said earlier, the books aren’t about murder, they aren’t even about death, they’re about duality and belonging, community and love. I think people are also fascinated with Quebec. They’re interested in the French/English culture and the history. I wanted to bring alive the life, culture, music and cuisine of Quebec. To make the books sensuous, engaging all the senses, so that anyone reading them doesn’t feel like a voyeur, but walks into the pages. Stands beside Gamache. Sits in the bistro with Clara and Gabri. Hopes Ruth doesn’t turn her rheumy eye on them.   

    Do you have a favorite character in your books? Do you find them easier to write now that they have been in so many books, or is that actually harder?   

    Trick question! Well, of course, Gamache. Ruth is fun to write. I love that she, like all the characters, I guess like all of us, has a saving grace. She genuinely is embittered, she’s drunk most of the time, she has a potty mouth, she says what she thinks and what she thinks is often not very kind, but she’s clever with it. It’s like she keeps all of her kindness deep down inside.  

    To be honest, I’m finding the characters increasingly interesting as the series goes along. As I get to know them. Like intimate friends, who never bore us.   

    There are, of course, challenges to writing a series with essentially the same characters and setting.  Not falling into a formula, becoming predictable, is a major one. But I get around that, I hope, by changing structure, theme, tone, and pace. By exploring new ideas, ones that make me think, and often make me uncomfortable. And so, also make the characters uncomfortable. And perhaps the reader.   

    I’m very aware that readers are spending precious time, and money, on the books, and I need to make it worthwhile.   

    I also have a duty to the characters who have given me a life beyond anything I could have dare dreamed.   

    A Better Man is on B&N bookshelves now.

    The post An Exclusive Interview with Author Louise Penny, Plus a Behind-the-Scenes Look at <i>A Better Man</i> appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 6:00 pm on 2019/09/06 Permalink
    Tags: a piece of the world, , B&N, , , , circe, , news of the world: a novel, , prairie fires: the american dreams of laura ingalls wilder, the essex serpent: a novel, the snow child   

    10 Books to Read if You Loved Inland, August’s B&N Book Club Selection 


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    The Barnes & Noble Book Club selection for August, Téa Obreht’s Inland, combines magical, mystical elements with historical fiction set in the rich, vibrant, gritty, and menacing American West of the late 1800s. In it, two unlikely lives intertwine—Nora, a fierce frontierswoman awaiting the return of her husband with water for their drought-ridden land, and Lurie, an outlaw haunted by the ghosts of people who want something from him. The vivid book is filled with suspense and surprises unveiled with every turn of the page.But what is a reader to do after finishing this incredible book and discussing it at your local B&N Book Club meeting on September 10 at 7 p.m.? We’ve rounded up 10 more reads to keep you busy until next month. Check out our readalike picks for Inland.

    Circe, by Madeline Miller
    For readers who loved the magic and mythical elements of Inland, Madeline Miller gives goddess Circe a rich and powerful retelling that will make readers feel as if they’re wandering amongst the famed characters of Greek mythology. Pulling her from the pages of Homer’s The Odyssey, Miller takes Circe from “the nymph with the lovely braids” that turns Odysseus’s men into pigs, and casts her as a hero in her own right with rich, cinematic storytelling. Daughter of Helios, god of the sun, and an outcast in her family for having no powers, Circe soon discovers she does indeed have powers that could threaten even the gods. Zeus, in turn, banishes her to an island, where she hones her witchcraft on her own and ultimately finds herself facing off with one of the most powerful and vengeful of the gods.

    All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy Series #1), by Cormac McCarthy
    Much like Inland, Cormac McCarthy’s profound first book in the Border Trilogy takes readers on a journey across an often unforgiving landscape as 16-year-old John Grady Cole leaves his home in Texas on horseback following the death of his grandfather. He is joined by his friend Lacey Rawlins and a 14-year-old sharpshooter named Jimmy Blevins. Together the three teens navigate not only the geographical terrain of their trip to Mexico, treacherous desert weather, wily bandits, and corrupt Mexican officials, but also the deeper meanings of friendship, life, love, and inhumanity. McCarthy’s literary prose transports the reader to the plains the boys themselves traverse, and the connection between the horses and humans is profound in this must-read bestseller.

    The Snow Child, by Eowyn Ivey
    Eowyn Ivey’s 2012 debut novel, a retelling of a Russian fairy tale about a girl made from snow who comes to life, beautifully blends magical realism and historical fiction, just as Téa Obreht did with Inland. Jack and Mabel, a childless middle-aged couple, struggles to build a new life for themselves in the brutal Alaska wilderness of the 1920s, and in an effort to distract themselves from the harsh realities of their surroundings and inner despair, they build a child out of snow during the season’s first snowfall. The next day, the show child has simply vanished, but Jack sees a real girl running through the woods. Jack and Mabel come to care for this enigmatic child called Faina as their very own, but they soon learn that everything is not as it appears.

    News of the World: A Novel, by Paulette Jiles
    Paulette Jiles’s National Book Award Finalist finds Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, an elderly war vet in 1870s Texas, hired to travel 400 treacherous miles to San Antonio to deliver a 10-year-old orphan to her relatives. Recently rescued by the U.S. Army, the girl has lived for four years with the Kiowa tribe after they killed her parents and sibling. She has forgotten the English language and doesn’t remember a time before the Kiowas took her in. Having just been ripped away from the only home she knows, Johanna attempts to run away repeatedly during the pair’s long journey. Over time, however, she begins to trust Captain Kidd as they bond on a mutual quest for survival.

    Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder, by Caroline Fraser
    Inland readers who enjoyed the feeling of being transported through American history will find a new favorite read in this beautiful biography. Fans of Little House on the Prairie feel like they know Laura Ingalls Wilder, the beloved author of the autobiographical children’s books. But Caroline Fraser, editor of the Library of America edition of the Little House series, fully reveals the true story of Wilder’s life, which was far more difficult than the children’s books that encapsulated the pioneer spirit ever described. Pulling research from unpublished manuscripts, letters, diaries, and more, Fraser paints an intricate portrait of a woman who lost nearly everything before spinning the tales of her impoverished upbringing into a treasured series of enthralling books adored by generations of children and adults.

    The Essex Serpent: A Novel, by Sarah Perry
    Magical realism and an incredible bond between two unlikely individuals tie together themes of Inland and Sarah Perry’s The Essex Serpent. Perry’s novel, set in 19th century England, finds Cora Seaborne, an intelligent and restless woman, pushed into a society marriage at the age of 19. When her husband dies unexpectedly, leaving her with her young son and his nanny, Martha, Cora is glad to be free again. Headed to the country for privacy, she finds herself drawn to a local legend about a magical serpent blamed for a recent death. Cora decides she will prove the legend a farce and perhaps even discover a new species. In the process, she meets William Ransome, the local vicar, who seeks to do the same for different reasons. Their relationship is at the heart of this dark, magical story of love, mystery, and opposites attracting.

    Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson
    Marilynne Robinson’s winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction will become a fast favorite among fans of Inland. In this tale of fathers and sons that covers three generations—from the Civil War to the 20th century—77-year-old Rev. John Ames in 1956 offers an account of his life, his father’s, and his grandfather’s—both preachers before him—in the form of a letter to his 6-year-old son with Ames’s young wife. Ames relays his meditations on faith, the spiritual battles raging at the heart of America, and the slow death of what the country once was in a remarkable book that will stick with readers long after they’ve turned the final page.

    A Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline
    Many have gazed upon Andrew Wyeth’s iconic 1948 painting Christina’s World and tried to imagine just who this prairie woman was and why she had so very far to go. And Orphan Train‘s author took that very idea and put pen to paper in this beautiful collision of fact and fiction. In A Piece of the World, Kline imagines Anna Christina Olson, Wyeth’s dark-haired, enigmatic subject, with the same grace and vivid detail in which Wyeth famously depicted her as she crawls across a field toward her family’s farmhouse in Maine. Destined for small-town life, Christina is Wyeth’s neighbor, a woman who soon becomes his greatest inspiration in this emotionally resonant character portrait that will appeal to readers who loved Inland.

    Only Killers and Thieves, by Paul Howarth
    Inland readers looking to be once again transported to and immersed in a different place and time in history will find that in Paul Howarth’s Only Killers and Thieves, a gritty tale set in the Australian outback of 1885. Life in colonial Australia bears a striking resemblance to that of the early American Wild West—it’s savage, untamed, and the indigenous people are targeted by the Native Police Force. In an outback suffering from devastating drought, two young brothers search for justice for a shocking tragedy—the murder of their parents and sister by, they believe, the family’s former Aboriginal stockman. But the truth they discover on their quest for vengeance is far more complicated, with severe, far-reaching consequences the boys could never have imagined.

    Caroline: Little House, Revisited, by Sarah Miller
    Another one for fans of both Inland and Laura Ingalls Wilder, Sarah Miller’s Caroline: Little House, Revisited, a novel authorized by the Little House Heritage Trust, paints a vivid portrait of life on the frontier in all its joy and hardship with a focus on one particularly courageous pioneer woman—Caroline Ingalls, “Ma” in Wilder’s beloved Little House books. The book finds the Ingalls family in February 1870, preparing to leave Wisconsin via wagon for a new life in Kansas Indian Territory. Readers can witness through a fresh perspective the Ingalls family’s familiar story as Caroline learns to overcome the struggles of pioneer life and relish the promise of a new opportunity for her and her family.

    What books would you recommend for fans of Inland?

    The post 10 Books to Read if You Loved <i>Inland</i>, August’s B&N Book Club Selection appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 1:00 pm on 2019/08/28 Permalink
    Tags: alison roman, , america's test kitchen twentieth anniversary, B&N, , ethan becker, get cooking, irma s. rombauer, john becker, , marion rombauer becker, megan scott, , nothing fancy: unfussy food for having people over, , rachael ray 50: memories and meals from a sweet and savory life, , steven r. gundry, the pioneer woman cooks: the new frontier, the plant paradox family cookbook, the whole30 friends & family   

    7 New Cookbooks Fit for Fall 


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    Fall is just around the corner, which is great news for everyone who loves to cook but couldn’t bear to turn their stoves on during those off-the-charts hot days of summer. We’ve rounded up some of the best new cookbook releases to offer up some much-needed inspiration to stop using your oven for storage and dust off the Instant Pot you bought last December. So get ready to fill your house with yummy smells like braised pork, banana bread, lemony turmeric tea cake, and—of course—pumpkin-spice everything.

    The Pioneer Woman Cooks: The New Frontier: 112 Fantastic Favorites for Everyday Eating, by Ree Drummond
    Bestselling author, Food Network star, busy businesswoman, and butter-loving country gal, Ree Drummond—better known as The Pioneer Woman—has made some time in her crazy schedule to show us just how her cooking has evolved as life on the ranch with her husband and kids continues to change. Packed with 112 all-new recipes, this new cookbook has an awesome mix of traditional and new flavors with hearty comfort food, lighter (but still flavorful!) low-carb recipes, family-friendly dishes, and more. We can’t wait to try out the Instant Pot Pumpkin Spice Oatmeal that just screams “FALL!” for breakfast, Cauliflower Fried Rice to bring for lunch at the office, and Blueberry Ricotta Crostini for next time we want to impress dinner guests.

    Joy of Cooking: 2019 Edition Fully Revised and Updated, by Irma S. Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker, Ethan Becker, John Becker, and Megan Scott
    Widely considered the most popular American cookbook, Irma Rombauer’s cooking bible has been continuously in print since 1931. And if your well-worn copy is in tatters, singed from sitting too close to the stove and splattered with bits of dough, oil, and sauces from recipes gone by, you’re in luck! This brand-new edition has been fully revised and expanded by Irma’s great-grandson John Becker and his wife, Megan Scott, retaining the charm and tradition of the original while updating techniques and ingredients and including more than 600 new recipes. Favorites like Banana Bread Cockaigne and Southern Corn Bread remain, while delectable Chana Masala and Beef Rendang join their ranks. And we can’t wait to dig into some of the new veggie recipes like Spicy Chickpea Soup and Caramelized Tamarind Tempeh.

    Rachael Ray 50: Memories and Meals from a Sweet and Savory Life, by Rachael Ray
    In her latest release, which is part memoir and part cookbook, Rachael Ray reflects on how her passion for food formed over the course of the last 50 years. The popular self-taught chef fills her new book with the same energy and joy she infuses into all her culinary endeavors with 25 essays capturing Rachael’s favorite memories and moments and 125 yummy recipes—the ones Rachael holds near and dear to heart and makes in her own home. Beautiful food images, personal photos, and illustrations drawn by Rachael herself round out this inspiring new volume and make it feel like a scrapbook of Rachael’s sweet and savory life so far.

    The Whole30 Friends & Family: 150 Recipes for Every Social Occasion, by Melissa Hartwig Urban
    Tackling Whole30 can be a daunting proposition, especially when there are so many occasions that might tempt you to break your diet—holidays, birthdays, baby showers, dinner parties, brunches and more. For those not in the know, Whole30 is basically a big elimination diet in which you avoid sugar, alcohol, legumes, grains, dairy, and other foods for 30 days to give your body a full reset. But with the help of this new cookbook from Melissa Hartwig Urban, the CEO and founder of Whole30, it can not only be a lot easier but also super-delicious. So whether you’re the host of the next event or just contributing a dish, this cookbook is filled with fun dips, appetizers, entrees, sides, drinks, and more—all Whole30 approved!

    America’s Test Kitchen Twentieth Anniversary TV Show Cookbook: Best-Ever Recipes from the Most Successful Cooking Show on TV, by America’s Test Kitchen
    Superfans of America’s Test Kitchen will love this giftable volume celebrating the 20th anniversary of the longest-running cooking show on public television. Editors rounded up more than 500 of the best recipes from the show’s 19 seasons to help fans create these delectable dishes at home. Bonus: The cookbook actually includes all of the recipes from the upcoming 20th season. Plus, fans will get a behind-the-scenes look at the show and the cast members they’ve come to know and love over the years. Readers will also get tips and tricks for the recipes infused with the show’s personality all packed into this gorgeous 592-page, full-color cookbook.

    Nothing Fancy: Unfussy Food for Having People Over, by Alison Roman
    Having people over to your house to share some food doesn’t have to be a huge ordeal that involves polishing silver and learning how to sous-vide something (or learning what exactly “sous-vide” means). And it can still be amazing without all the fancy food that requires you to be in the kitchen all day. That’s exactly what Alison Roman, author of Dining In and New York Times columnist, wants people to see with her new cookbook, which is filled with all-new, easy-to-execute recipes for a last-minute weeknight dinner with a coworker or a weekend dinner party with 15 people from the office. So get ready for some fun with DIY martini bars, pots of coconut-braised chicken and chickpeas, pans of lemony turmeric tea cake, and more.

    The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook: 80 One-Pot Recipes to Nourish Your Family Using Your Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, or Sheet Pan, by Steven R. Gundry
    In his groundbreaking 2017 book, The Plant Paradox, renowned cardiologist Dr. Steven Gundry educated us about the hidden danger lurking in many people’s diets—a highly toxic, plant-based protein called lectin. But a lot of The Plant Paradox converts were left wondering, “How can I keep this in mind when cooking for my whole family—especially my kids?” Dr. Gundry’s answer to that is his latest release, which reveals the ways in which the program is not only safe for the whole family but is also a great way to set up kids for a lifetime of healthy eating. The new cookbook offers up more than 80 recipes that are a breeze to make thanks to using an Instant Pot, slow cooker, or just a sheet pan.

    What new cookbooks are you excited about for fall?

    The post 7 New Cookbooks Fit for Fall appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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