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  • Jeff Somers 4:00 pm on 2017/10/30 Permalink
    Tags: , bentley little, bird box, blindness, blood meridian, carrion comfort, , , , dathan auerbach, dawn, , exquisite corpose, , ghost story, , hell house, , , , jack ketchum, jose saramago, josh malarian, koji suzuki, lionel shriver, , , , , , penal, , peter straub, poppy z. brite, ramsey campbell, , richard matheson, ring, rosemary’s baby, scott smith, , something wicked this way comes, , the face that must die, the girl next door, , the ruins, the walking, , , we need to talk about kevin,   

    25 of the Most TERRIFYING Horror Books Ever 

    Literature can be a moving, beautiful artistic experience. Skilled writers can bring us face to face with scenarios and emotions we might never encounter in real life, expanding our understanding of both the universe and our fellow man.

    It can also scare the living daylights out of us. Horror novels don’t always get the respect they deserve; just because something is scary doesn’t mean it’s not “literary” or well-crafted art, but if the core purpose of a story is perceived to be “making you soil yourself in fear” for some reason that story won’t get much respect. Of course, a story can be terrifying without necessarily being great art. If your goal is to be so terrified of a book that you put it in the freezer and book a hotel room for a few days, here are twenty-five books that might not necessarily be the best horror novels, but are certainly the scariest.

    Literally Everything Edgar Allan Poe Wrote
    Poe had a knack for infusing everything he wrote with visceral dread. His characters and narrators tend towards the mentally fragile and the insane, people who are haunted by things that might be literal or might be manifestations of their unsound thought processes. Either way, stories like The Tell-Tale Heart or The Cask of Amontillado retain their power to petrify more than a century-and-a-half after their publication because Poe tapped into the fundamental fear we all have that the world and people around us are not what they seem.

    House of Leaves, by Mark Z. Danielewski
    Put simply, House of Leaves is one of the most frightening books ever written. From a fairly standard horror premise (a house is revealed to be slightly larger on the inside than is strictly possible) Danielewski spins out a dizzying tale involving multiple unreliable narrators, typographic mysteries, and looping footnotes that manage to drag the reader into the story and then make them doubt their own perception of that story. It’s a trick no one else has managed to such dramatic effect, making this novel more of a participatory experience than any other work of literature—which, considering the dark madness at its core, isn’t necessarily a pleasant experience.

    Rosemary’s Baby, by Ira Levin
    The film adaptation has supplanted the novel in pop culture, but the novel was a huge hit for Levin—and the film actually sticks to the plot and dialog so closely you really do get a feel for the novel from watching it. The story of a young woman who becomes pregnant after a nightmare gets its terror not from the well-known twist of the baby’s parentage (hint: not her husband), but from the increasing isolation Rosemary experiences as her suspicions about everyone around her grow. So many threads tie into the terror, from the emotional and economic uncertainty of a struggling young couple to the simple fear any mother has for their child, all expertly knotted into a story that will keep you awake at night.

    The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson
    When you think about clichés in horror fiction, the haunted house is at the top of the list, an idea done so often it’s frequently an unintentional parody. Shirley Jackson, however, was no ordinary writer, and she takes the concept of the haunted house and perfects it. The Haunting of Hill House is simply the best haunted house story ever written. The scares come not just from the malevolent actions of a house that seems sentient and angry, but from the claustrophobia we experience from the novel’s unreliable narrator, Eleanor, whose descent into madness is slow and excruciating and only begins after we’ve been lulled into a false sense of security by the seeming relatability of her early persona.

    Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
    The great sage Pat Benatar once sang that hell is for children. Golding’s account of children stranded on an island without supplies or adult supervision is absolutely terrifying for one simple reason: there’s nothing supernatural going on. It’s a story about insufficiently socialized humans descending into savagery because that’s our fundamental nature. You look into the abyss at the center of this novel and the abyss looks back.

    We Need to Talk About Kevin, by Lionel Shriver
    Another story centered on the terror of children, the horror inherent in this story comes from the fact that the human beings we create eventually become their own people—and possibly strangers to us. Not everyone has a close and loving relationship with their parents, and while the idea that your own kids might grow up to be criminals isn’t pleasant, most people assume they will at least recognize themselves in their kids. But what if you don’t? What if your child—your child—is a blank monster?

    Night Film, by Marisha Pessl
    In the Internet Age it’s pretty easy to fall down a rabbit hole of pop culture obsession, and there are still dark areas of culture that haven’t had a wiki created around them. Pessl’s story about a mysterious underground filmmaker whose movies may or may not contain hints of dark power and horrific events and the journalist who becomes obsessed with him asks the reader how you can be certain there’s a clear line between fact and fiction, then, once that wedge of doubt is established, presents a terrifying fiction to fill that space.

    Ring, by Kōji Suzuki
    The novel that inspired the horror films of the same name, the premise is well-known: anyone who watches a mysterious videotape of creepy images is informed that they will die in seven days—and then they die. The investigation into the tape and how to avoid this grim fate leads to what remains an incredibly shocking backstory involving rape, smallpox, and a forgotten well. Technology has shifted, but the terror never really relied on VHS tapes—it’s the concept that ideas can be deadly, that simply by experiencing something you can be doomed, that’s so horrifying.

    Penpal, by Dathan Auerbach
    Pivoting on the idea that we’re often blinded by the details we can see, making it impossible to see the bigger picture, Auerbach’s debut began life as a series of creepypasta stories on the Internet. The episodic nature of the story is ideal for the effect he achieves; the narrator tells of being a young boy and sending a penpal request attached to a balloon with his classmates, including his best friend Josh. He doesn’t receive a response until nearly a year later, and his life takes a turn for the bizarre shortly afterwards. A series of tragic and strange things happen to him and everyone around him, building a sense of dread that is only increased when the truth is revealed.

    Carrion Comfort, by Dan Simmons
    Simmons’ novel follows several groups of people who have The Ability, a psychic power that allows them to take control of others from a distance and force them to perform any action. When one of their puppets murders someone, the person with The Ability is invigorated and strengthened. Simmons doesn’t shy away from the implications of this power on history and the future, and the book will destroy any sense of security you have in the world around you, revealed to possibly be simply a worldwide board game for those who can control us all like pawns.

    Pet Sematary, by Stephen King
    Several of King’s books could be on this list, but he frequently blunts the terror of his stories with the richness and humanity of his characterizations and the sprawl of his narratives. Pet Sematary manages to be his most terrifying novel by dint of its simple, devastating concept: a magical cemetery where buried things come back to a sort-of life—but aren’t quite what they once were. From that simple idea King ramps up to a climax that gets under your skin in a fundamental way most horror stories fail to.

    The Girl Next Door, by Jack Ketchum
    Horror often pivots on the corruption or warping of societal norms and rules; once you feel like you can’t rely on the natural social order, literally anything is possible. Ketchum’s disturbing novel about the unimaginable abuse suffered by two sisters when they are forced to live with their mentally unstable aunt and her three savage sons is based on real events, but it’s the central theme of an adult giving official sanction to the atrocities that makes this story so utterly horrifying.

    Blindness, by Jose Saramago
    Helplessness is a key factor in a lot of horror; most people labor under the delusion that they are in charge of their destiny and their lives, and horror is often effective simply by reminding us how little control we actually have. An epidemic of blindness leaves an entire city’s population secluded in a mental institution as society within and without crumbles. The brutality and descent into animalistic madness is all too realistic, and Saramago manages to capture the terrifying confusion and helplessness experienced by people in a society that no longer functions.

    Blood Meridian, by Cormac McCarthy
    McCarthy’s entire writing style and technique is terrifying; the man could write a grocery list that leaves the reader dripping with dread. This tale of extreme, ruthless, and pervasive violence in the American west emerges from under a sheen of the unreal to become all too real, and the greatest trick McCarthy manages here is by making the single most terrifying aspect of the story—the main character’s death—the one act of brutality he doesn’t depict, leaving the terrors contained within that scene to our imagination—which is infinitely worse than anything he might have conjured.

    Exquisite Corpse, by Poppy Z. Brite
    Brite’s most famous novel follows two serial killers who initially aim to kill each other but, upon discovering a fellow traveler, instead engage in a spree of horrific sex and murder. The matter-of-fact way the pair concocts a plan to kidnap, torture, and then consume a beautiful gay man named Tran is the sort of stuff that could simply be shocking, but Brite continuously considers the value of existence and what we could all be doing with the time we have left—time we too often imagine to be infinite when, of course, we’re all going to be consumed someday by something.

    Something Wicked This Way Comes, by Ray Bradbury
    Bradbury’s epic rumination on childhood and adulthood tells the story of a magical circus come to a small town, offering the residents dark gifts they weren’t aware they wanted—most notably the carousel that can change your physical age, making boys who yearn to be adults grow older, and middle-aged men and women who yearn for their lost youth to grow younger. Bradbury knows the worst horror in the world is losing the natural order of your life, and perfectly captures the combination of dread and excitement everyone experiences as they crack the mysteries separating them from adulthood.

    Hell House, by Richard Matheson
    What Matheson taps into in this classic haunted house story is the universal fear that we are already lost, already broken. Hired to investigate the existence of an afterlife by exploring the notoriously haunted Belasco House, a team moves in and slowly succumbs to the influence of the entity within—an entity that only uses their own weaknesses and secret shames against them. Their descent into the depths of horror is too close for comfort as a result—for everyone reading the book knows all too well that they have weaknesses, and secret shames, as well.

    The Face That Must Die, by Ramsey Campbell
    Campbell wrote a number of books that are absolutely terrifying, but this one stands out in the way he forces the reader to completely inhabit the mind of a very sick man, Horridge. As he fixates on an overweight man living in his neighborhood, the reader is forced to see the world consistently through his eyes. Everything is off-beat, everything drips with ominous meaning and horrific intent. Horridge sees the entire world as a horror that must be destroyed, and for a while the reader is carried along on that uncomfortable point of view, leaving them exhausted and terrified.

    Haunted, by Chuck Palahniuk
    Told in alternating chapters that depict a group of aspiring writers voluntarily secluded in an unusual writer’s retreat and the stories they’re writing, Haunted not only contains one of the most disturbing short stories ever published (“Guts,” which caused several people to faint when Palahniuk read it in public) it’s also a deep dive into madness as the reality-TV obsessed characters start sabotaging their experiment in a quest for fame. The sense of suffocating dread that Palahniuk applies grows so incrementally you don’t notice it until you suddenly realize you’ve been holding your breath for five pages.

    Dawn, by Octavia Butler
    Although technically science fiction, this story of the human race centuries after a devastating apocalypse is straight terror in many ways. Lilith is one of the last surviving humans, awakened on an alien ship. The aliens, three-sexed and many-tentacled, offer Lilith a deal: they will help her repopulated the Earth, but their price is to breed with humanity to gain humanity’s “talent” for cancer (and the creative possibilities it offers) while blunting their self-destructive tendencies. The horror imbued in each page is subtle, but it exerts tremendous mental pressure as you progress through the story.

    The Walking, by Bentley Little
    Far from just another tale of zombies, Little’s story of a man whose father rises from death after a stroke sizzles with a sense of doom long before the reader understands what’s at stake. Discovering that many families are hiding zombie relatives, and have been for some time, private investigator Miles Huerdeen digs into the mystery—and what he finds is easily the scariest stuff about zombies you’ll ever read. If you watch zombie movies and shows and laugh at their shuffling, mindless threat, this book will change your mind.

    The Ruins, by Scott Smith
    Smith’s story is deceptively simple: a group of tourists in Mexico go off in search of an archaeological site where a friend has set up camp; they find a pyramid covered in odd vines, the land around it salted and barren. Once on the pyramid, they discover the dead body of their friend, covered in the vines, and that the nearby villagers have arrived with guns to force them to remain on the pyramid. The vines are one of those simple monsters that seem so easy to defeat at first blush, yet the inexorable doom that descends on the characters slowly, grindingly proves otherwise.

    Bird Box, by Josh Malerman
    Malerman’s intense story of a world that slowly crumbles as people go murderously insane after seeing mysterious creatures—referred to simply as The Problem—is so scary because the reader only has the information that the characters have, and that’s not much. The world collapses and the survivors can only seal themselves off from the outside and try to avoid the worst, leading to a torturous wearing down of hope that leaves the reader defenseless against the horrible images Malerman conjures.

    Ghost Story, by Peter Straub
    A good old-fashioned ghost story is designed to terrify and entertain, and Straub’s breakthrough novel does both. Five old friends gather regularly to trade ghost stories, but when one of them dies mysteriously and the survivors begin to dream of their own deaths, a secret from their past is revealed—and the simple pleasures of a ghost story are explored to their most frightening ends by a master of the form.

    Beloved, by Toni Morrison
    If you don’t think of Beloved as a horror story, you haven’t been paying attention. Morrison’s skill as a writer is in full effect as she draws the reader into what is assuredly one of the saddest and most horrifying stories committed to paper. There’s no more terrifying sequence than the long slide into madness as escaped slave Sethe, convinced the young woman calling herself Beloved is the daughter she murdered in an attempt to keep her safe from slavers come to reclaim them, grows steadily thinner and weaker as she gives everything she has—including food—to Beloved, who grows steadily larger.

    Did we leave off any truly terrifying books? Let us know in the comments.

    The post 25 of the Most TERRIFYING Horror Books Ever appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Monique Alice 6:11 pm on 2014/10/02 Permalink
    Tags: angle of repose, , blood meridian, close range: wyoming stories, , , , , , the grapes of wrath, the hot kid, wallace stegner, ,   

    Best of The West: Painted Horses and 6 Other Western Fiction Favorites 

    Painted HorsesMalcolm Brooks’ new book, Painted Horses, is getting loads of acclaim from fans and critics alike. It’s a sweeping novel with all the trappings of a classic Western: the unforgiving-yet-gorgeous landscape, the struggle between greed and compassion, and, of course, lots of horses. The main character, Catherine LeMay, is an ambitious young archaeologist commissioned to search for Native American artifacts in a desolate canyon in 1950s Montana. Her ruthless employer hired her for her gender and youth, betting she’ll fail at her task and thus allow him to flood the canyon and build a profitable dam. We follow Catherine in her endeavors, occasionally taking jaunts through her memories. Along the way, we meet John H., a vaguely sad and sharply charming mustanger-cum-landscape painter; Miriam, Catherine’s smart and capable Native American assistant; and Jack Allen, a brutal horse catcher assigned as Catherine’s guide. The characters are well-developed, and the novel begins at a comfortable, methodical pace before building to a nail-biting crescendo. Brooks’ writing shines most brilliantly in his depiction of the canyon’s wild horses. He brings these creatures vividly to life, capturing their indomitable, majestic spirit and presenting it as a metaphor for the West itself.

    Now, be warned: if you read Painted Horses (which you should!), you’re likely to find yourself suddenly head-over-heels for Westerns. Luckily, we’ve got you covered, with these essential cornerstones of any Western collection.

    Lonesome Dove, by Larry McMurtry
    I’m just going to come out and say this: there are books out there as good as Lonesome Dove, but few that are better. This book and its sequel, Streets of Laredo, simultaneously show the 19th-century West at its grittiest and most idealistic. Retired Texas Rangers Gus McCrae and Woodrow Call decide to take a break from ranching and ragging on one another to take one last adventure together: a cattle drive to Montana, where they plan to settle for good. Put mildly, there are some bumps in the road. You’ll laugh hard and cry harder, and it will all be completely worth it. Trust me.

    The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
    We don’t traditionally think of this Great American Novel as a Western—it’s short on cowboys and whiskey, for one thing. There are barely even any cows! However, I make the case that it should be included. The Joad family, decimated by the Great Depression, decides to add their number to that of so many Americans forced West to look for work in the Dust Bowl migration. From the outset, the Joads’ journey is hard, and it only gets harder as they get closer to the promised land of California. Though this novel will bend your faith in humanity nearly to the breaking point, it will also reassure you that hope does indeed spring eternal. There is no greater ode to American tenacity, stoicism, and dignity. In my book, that makes The Grapes of Wrath an honorary Western. No library is complete without it.

    The Hot Kid, by Elmore Leonard
    Okay, after those two heavy reads, you’re really going to need some fun. Happily, nothing’s more fun than reading Elmore Leonard. He introduces us to Carlos “Carl” Webster, a U.S. Marshall sworn to rid 1920s Oklahoma of such scum as “Babyface” Nelson and the notorious John Dillinger. Leonard is at his best with this work, giving us line after line of quick-witted dialogue delivered by a host of, shall we say, idiosyncratic characters. The word this novel conjures up is that defining hallmark of the West itself: wild.

    Close Range: Wyoming Stories, by Annie Proulx
    With this collection of 11 short stories, Proulx evokes the shimmering, hazy line on the Western horizon. You know, the one that blends fantasy with reality. In addition to featuring some of the best titles ever, like “People in Hell Just Want a Drink of Water,” these stories truly captivate us with the beautiful mystery that is the American West. Proulx sweeps into rural Wyoming like a dusty gust of wind, picking up her characters one by one just long enough to make you miss them when she sets them down again. This collection is forlorn, magical, and hauntingly beautiful. Bonus: it features a little story you may have heard of, by the name of “Brokeback Mountain.”

    Blood Meridian, or The Evening Redness in the West, by Cormac McCarthy
    Blood Meridian, as it is typically known, is perhaps best defined as the anti-Western Western. Think the Old West was all fun and games and teepees and singin’ songs under the stars? Well, it wasn’t, and McCarthy is here to let you know it. Some people say that if you haven’t read McCarthy before, you shouldn’t start here, but I say, if you’re going to do a thing, just go do it, goshdarnit! With that said, proceed with extreme caution if you have a weak stomach. As the title suggests, there’s quite a bit of blood. And guts. And other bodily fluids. You get the picture. If you can get past that, you’re in for a literary masterpiece. Many have compared McCarthy’s prose to that of Faulkner, and with good reason. It’s driving, lyrical, and seems to follow its own set of rules. Like Faulkner, McCarthy doesn’t hold your hand through the tough times. He presents the heart-rending truths of the 1850s frontier with a dispassionate frankness. His nonchalance makes you want to wail at him, “Hey, don’t you care? People are dying horrific deaths over here and everything is terrible!” The seeming indifference of his narration is what stirs readers’ own humanity. Pretty clever, if you can stomach it.

    Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner
    Angle of Repose centers on Lyman Ward, a history professor confined to a wheelchair by a devastating bone disease. As Lyman comes to terms with his illness and disintegrated marriage, he finds purpose in exploring the lives of his grandparents through letters written by his grandmother, Susan. Spanning two centuries and the width of the North American continent, this book is a treatise on the recurring themes of life, and in particular, marriage. Compromise, self-discovery, betrayal, and bitter disappointment are all central figures in this grand, ambitious novel. Another main character is, of course, the West itself. Susan’s marriage to husband Oliver comes springing to life against a backdrop of pioneer camps and ore mines as the two follow a wayward path that winds throughout the frontier landscape. It’s a rough-yet-elegant novel that will leave you wistful for a time you’ve never known, and, I’m afraid, will do little to quell your budding Western addiction.

    What are your favorite westerns?

     
  • BN Editors 4:30 pm on 2014/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , a lesson before dying, , a thousand splended suns, animal dreams, , blood meridian, , , , , , harry potter and the deathly hallows, , , , , , , , , , one hundred years of solitude, , , , , sandman slim, , still life with woodpecker, , , the fellowship of the ring, , the glass menagerie, the mysteries of pittsburgh, , the things they carried, the watsons go to birmingham 1963, ,   

    43 Great Quotes From Literature We Forgot to Mention 

    TKAMLast week we collected 10 of our favorite lines in literature, but it appears we have forgotten some. Embarrassing! To those of you who weighed in on your own favorites in the comments: thank you. They were fun to read. And here they are!

    “My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.” —The Princess Bride (Sharon F.)

    “It is a truth universally that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.” —Pride and Prejudice (Shelley H.)

    “Have a biscuit, Potter.” —Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Megan B.)

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” —A Tale of Two Cities (Mary Ellen R.)

    “My dear, I don’t give a damn.” —Gone With the Wind (Michelle C.)

    “Most men and women will grow up to love their servitude and will never dream of revolution.” —Brave New World (Amber D.)

    “By the time we arrived, as evening was approaching, I felt as sore as a rock must feel when the waterfall has pounded on it all day long.” —Memoirs of a Geisha (Sunny H.)

    “Neighbours bring food with death and flowers with sickness and little things in between. Boo was our neighbour. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good luck pennies, and our lives.” —To Kill a Mockingbird (Shirisha T.)

    “The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.” —The Gunslinger (Rob B.)

    “Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit em, but remember that it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” —To Kill a Mockingbird (Kristy E.)

    “And so we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” —The Great Gatsby (Caitlyn S.)

    “I think of my life as a kind of music, not always good music but still having form and melody.”—East of Eden (Jessica H.)

    “Stay gold, Ponyboy, stay gold.” —The Outsiders (Laura M.)

    “And in that moment, like a swift intake of breath, the rain came.” —Other Voices, Other Rooms (Madalaine B.)

    “Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents!” —Little Women (Peggy C.)

    “When the day shall come that we do part,” he said softly, and turned to look at me, “if my last words are not ‘I love you’—you’ll ken it was because I didn’t have time.” —The Fiery Cross (Sharon T.)

    “Hey, boo.” —To Kill a Mockingbird (Theresa M.)

    “I believe there are monsters born in the world to human parents.” –East of Eden (JA R.)

    “I meant what I said and I said what I meant. An elephant’s faithful one-hundred percent!” —Horton Hatches the Egg (Carlie B.)

    “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” —The Fellowship of the Ring (Mel F.)

    “Tomorrow I’ll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day.” —Gone with the Wind (Carla M.)

    “If this typewriter can’t do it, then f@#$ it, it can’t be done. —Still Life with Woodpecker (Dan E.)

    “Sometimes you have to keep on steppin’.”—The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963 (Mary D.)

    “There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” —Pride and Prejudice (Pauline S.)

    “Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember except the story.” The Things They Carried (Kristy C.)

    “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” –Anna Karenina (JA R.)

    “Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt.” —Slaughterhouse-Five (Heather R.)

    “Marley was dead as a doornail.” —A Christmas Carol (Colleen D.)

    “Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aurelio Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon that his father took him to discover ice.” —One Hundred Years of Solitude (Janice S.)

    “What fresh hell is this?” —Jane Eyre (Katie D.)

    “Heart like shale. What you need is a good fracking.” —MaddAddam (Anna L.)

    “Always.” —Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Aimee U.)

    “Everything’s profound when there’s guns and zombies.” —Sandman Slim (Caroline R.)

    “To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is the bad dream.” —The Bell Jar (Veronica F.)

    “For one last time, Miriam does as she is told.” —A Thousand Splendid Suns (Barbara W.)

    “And that’s all we are Jefferson, all of us on this earth, a piece of drifting wood. Until we—each of us, individually—decide to become something else. I am still that piece of drifting wood, and those out there are no better. But you can be better.” —A Lesson Before Dying (Emily K.)

    “As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.” —The Fault in Our Stars (Jen P.)

    “‘Nobody run off with her,’ Roscoe said. ‘She just run off with herself, I guess.’” —Lonesome Dove (Cindy A.)

    “At the beginning of the summer I had lunch with my father, the gangster, who was in town for the weekend to transact some of his vague business.” —The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (Arthur M.)

    “What keeps you going isn’t some fine destination but just the road you’re on, and the fact that you know how to drive.” —Animal Dreams (Liz M.)

    “He was dancing, dancing. He says he’ll never die.” —Blood Meridian (Reed M.)

    “We’re all damaged, somehow.” —A Great and Terrible Beauty (Caitlin P.)

    “He’s more myself than I am.” —Wuthering Heights (Cortina W.)

    “Life is pain, highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.” —The Princess Bride, Betty D.

    “You know it don’t take much intelligence to get yourself into a nailed-up coffin, Laura. But who in hell ever got himself out of one without removing one nail?” —The Glass Menagerie (chelseyam)

    What great literary quotations did we STILL forget?

     
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