Tagged: Biography Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Jeff Somers 5:00 pm on 2018/01/22 Permalink
    Tags: , Biography, expert accounts   

    20 Books by People Who Actually Know What They’re Talking About 

    Fiction can show us lives and worlds that don’t exist, or that we have no access to. History can help us understand our world. Biographies can help us understand the people in it. But many books are written at a remove—no matter how well-researched or how well-written, the author didn’t actually experience what they’re writing about, so there’s always a tiny piece of the puzzle missing. That’s not the case with these 20 books, all written by people who experienced something few others have. In other words, these are books by people who know what they’re talking about.

    Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery, by Scott Kelly
    Unless you’ve spent a year in space being studied, you have nothing on Scott Kelly, who holds the current American record for consecutive days in space. As a result, Kelly’s thoughts on our space program—including its necessity and utility—are worth reading, as is his description of the challenges that face anyone intending to spend a long time in space. If you’ve ever wondered what it’s really to head into orbit, Kelly’s book offers the most up-to-date and informative account ever written.

    Into Thin Air, by Jon Krakauer
    It’s the eternal conflict: you’re curious what it’s like to climb Mount Everest, especially under less-than-ideal conditions, but you just microwaved a burrito and you don’t feel like flying out to Nepal to find out. Read the next best thing: Krakauer’s classic book details a disastrous expedition to the summit of the mountain in 1996—an expedition he experienced firsthand, and one that six experienced climbers didn’t come back from. If this book doesn’t cure you of any lingering curiosity about climbing mountains, you’ll just have to go climb one.

    Girl, Interrupted, by Susanna Kaysen
    Ever wondered what it’s like to be declared a danger to yourself and placed in a mental hospital? Wonder no more, as Kaysen’s memoir (the basis for the film of the same name) details the events when that precise scenario happened to her in 1967, when she was 18. Although Kaysen committed herself, she describes the bullying techniques of the psychiatrist who pushed her to do so, and explains what life is really like in one of those places.

    Adrift: Seventy-Six Days Lost at Sea, by Steve Callahan
    The title says it all. While competing in a race across the Atlantic Ocean in 1981, Callahan got caught in a storm and lost his boat. Luckily, he managed to grab his emergency kit and get into the six-person raft he’d taken along as a precaution. For the next 76 days he drifted on the ocean, teaching himself how to catch fish, make repairs, and generally stay alive. If you’ve ever drifted during a stressful meeting and wondered what it might be like to be lost at sea, Callahan’s epic memoir will tell you.

    No Easy Day, by Mark Owen
    Written by one of the SEAL team members on hand when Osama Bin Laden was killed, you won’t get a clearer idea of what it’s really like to be a member of the elite special forces unit than the one you’ll find in this book. Owen’s career spans many headline-grabbing moments, as well as several that were never publicized. By the end, you’ll understand a bit better what it takes to be a Navy SEAL from someone who’s actually been one.

    Blue Latitudes, by Tony Horwitz
    What was it like to be an explorer in the age of the sail, out on the ocean in a rickety wooden ship? Horwitz decided to find out. He worked as a crew member on a replica of Captain Cook’s ship as it followed the famous explorer’s route into the unknown. We may not be able to quiz Cook or his crew on what it was really like to sail into the unknown in the 18th century, but Horwitz provides a pretty close account, because he actually did it. Except for the “18th century” part.

    Shantaram, by Gregory David Roberts
    This is a fictionalized account of real events, and Roberts’ account of his own life is contested by some, but in general, the facts are right: the author was sentenced to prison in Australia, escaped to Bombay, and lived there for a decade. Whether or not every single thing in Shantaram is true doesn’t matter; what you get from it is a sense of what it’s really like to live on the sketchier side of one of the world’s most crowded cities, a view most tourists will never see.

    Kon-Tiki, by Thor Heyerdahl
    Say you want to know what it might have been like to be ancient Perusians crowding onto balsa wood rafts and sailing west to settle the Polynesian islands. Thor Heyerdahl found out, by building his own raft and sailing from Peru, arriving three months later at Puka Puka. Proving that it was possible for primitive people to travel incredible distances, he also saved you the trouble of building your own flimsy raft and finding out what that adventure might be like.

    And the River Flowed as a Raft of Corpses, by Yamaguchi Tsutomu
    Ever wonder what it’s like to directly experience an atomic blast? Mr. Tsutomu actually experienced it—twice. He was in Hiroshima when the bomb dropped in 1945, and then in Nagasaki when the second bomb dropped three days later. That kind of luck will kill you, but Tsutomu survived both incidents, and went on to become a writer and poet. While adapting some of those poems, translator Chad Diehl includes a translation of Tsutomu’s account of the bombings as well, so you can scratch “experience atomic destruction (twice)” off your bucket list.

    Ice Bound, by Jerri Nielsen
    This is a twofer: Dr. Nielsen was both trapped at an isolated South Pole facility and forced to perform surgery on herself and treat herself with chemotherapy when she diagnosed herself with cancer. Unable to be transported out and unable to get anything in, Nielsen—the only doctor on staff—had to perform her own biopsy and then administer her own treatment for four months before weather conditions allowed rescue. So, if you’re wondering what it’s like to be at the South Pole and/or what it’s like to perform surgery on yourself, this is the book for you.

    Kitchen Confidential, by Anthony Bourdain
    Bourdain offers a surprisingly rare glimpse into the world of restaurant kitchens, both high-end and beyond sketchy. If you’ve ever been curious what it’s like to be a chef or to work in a professional kitchen, prepare to be beyond surprised at what actually goes on in some of the most famous kitchens in the world. Since he’s a world-famous chef who worked in those kitchens, he sure knows what he’s talking about.

    The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, by Jean Dominique Bauby
    Wondering what it’s like to be paralyzed may not be on you list of things to do today, but it offers the sort of calibration most of us need—after all, how bad are your troubles if you can still move? Bauby, the hugely successful editor of French Elle, suffered a stroke at the age of 43 that left him completely mute and paralyzed—except for his left eye. He dictated this book by working out a system of blinked code. If you want to gain a new appreciation of simply being in control of your body, read this book.

    Twelve Years a Slave, by Solomon Northup
    Northup’s famous memoir of slavery in 19th century America lays out the brutality, racism, and insanity of the practice in stark terms. Tricked and kidnapped, Northup’s decade lost in the plantation system will turn stomachs and shame anyone who wants to talk about the Civil War being about “states’ rights.”

    Long Way Gone, by Ishmael Beah
    Most people in the West are dimly aware of the phenomenon of child soldiers in Africa, but Ishmael Beah was a child soldier, sucked into the army at age 12. His candid depiction of the drug-fueled brutality he was forced to enact is harrowing, and his rescue at age 15 likely saved not just his life, but his soul. As clear a depiction of the evil that men do as you’ll ever read—from someone who was there.

    West with the Night, by Beryl Markham
    What’s it like to fly solo across the ocean? Beryl Markham can tell you. The first pilot to go nonstop from Europe to America, as well as the first woman to fly alone across the Atlantic, Markham’s memoir describes a life that was pretty fascinating even before she got into the cockpit. These days it might seem as if there are no new worlds to explore and no new records to set, but reading Markham’s book will at least let you know what it was like when an individual could just decide to do both.

    Night, by Eli Wiesel
    With fascism somehow back in the air like a virus, this is the ideal time to learn what experiencing the final destination of such thinking is like. Wiesel’s firsthand account of surviving the Nazi Holocaust is not easy reading. It is disturbing, and frightening, and necessary, because Wiesel was there, and he tells you in unflinching terms what it was like to survive a genocide.

    The Story of My Life, by Helen Keller
    Most of us take our senses for granted, and we live in a world designed around our ability to see and hear. Keller, rendered deaf and blind before she was two years old, managed to communicate somewhat with her family. At the age of six she began working with Anne Sullivan, who patiently broke through Keller’s isolation, teaching her how to interact with the world. Keller’s autobiography is a remarkable glimpse into what it’s like to exist without the basic senses most of us use to navigate our world.

    New Jack: Guarding Sing Sing, by Ted Conover
    What’s it like to be a prison guard? If you think you know from TV shows, you’ll be surprised to find out what it’s really like from Ted Conover. A journalist, Conover tried to shadow guards but was denied permission, and so he simply applied for a job, then spent a year working at the prison. His account is eye-opening, showing how the brutality of our prison system affects not just the prisoners, but the guards as well.

    Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member, by Sanyika Shakur
    Shakur, formerly Kody Scott, was so brutal as a member of the Crips, he earned the nickname Monster—this from his fellow gang members, who weren’t exactly gentle themselves. Locked up in solitary confinement for his crimes, Scott became Shakur, a convert to Islam and a reformed human being. His account of what it’s like to be in the L.A. gangs so often depicted in movies is sobering, as is his exploration of the societal failures that drove him into that life in the first place.

    When Breath becomes Air, by Paul Kalanithi
    What’s it like to die? We can’t know, Kalanithi’s memoir describing his terminal diagnosis and final years of life is a firsthand account of living with the sure knowledge that your time on Earth is limited. Our mortality is something we often avoid contemplating, but Kalanithi had no choice. His memoir should be required reading, if only for the perspective it offers.

    The post 20 Books by People Who Actually Know What They’re Talking About appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Ross Johnson 8:30 pm on 2018/01/03 Permalink
    Tags: Biography, ,   

    The Best Biographies & Memoirs of January 2018 

    All-American Murder: The Rise and Fall of Aaron Hernandez, the Superstar Whose Life Ended on Murderer’s Row, by James Patterson and Alex Abramovich with Mike Harvkey
    One of the most shocking and sad sports stories of the past five years, the murder conviction and subsequent suicide of NFL superstar Aaron Hernandez left sports fans reeling. A young man who seemed to have it all was implicated in multiple killings, and thriller writer Patterson and company promise a thorough and unvarnished true-crime look at the real Hernandez, with accounts from those who knew him, a look at his hometown, and an account of his final days.

    When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and asha bandele
    Advocate, artist, and queer activist Patrisse Cullors was one of the principal founders of the Black Lives Matter movement following the 2013 acquittal of George Zimmerman for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. It’s hard to overstate the influence that movement has had on our culture in the years since, both as inspiration and flashpoint. She’s joined by author and fellow activist asha bandele to tell her personal story of BLM and to talk about the culture that necessitated it.

    Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say, by Kelly Corrigan
    Corrigan structures a series of essays around some of the seemingly simple words and phrases that serve as gateways and barriers to communication. In her human and self-deprecating style, she examine the power of saying “no,” or “I don’t know,” or even “I was wrong.” If there’s ever been a need to think thoughtfully and compassionately about the ways in which we communicate, it’s now.

    The Monk of Mokha, by Dave Eggers
    McSweeney’s founder Eggers tells the true story of Mokhtar Alkhanshali, a San Franciscan child of Yemeni immigrants who became fascinated with Yemen’s rich history of coffee production. Traveling to his parent’s homeland, he became a student of coffee, visiting farms all of the country to collect samples and discover new means of cultivation with a goal of restoring a proud tradition and global market for Yemeni coffee. It was going well until 2015, when the Yemeni civil war broke out overnight, forcing Alkhanshali to attempt a daring escape. Those are just a few of the many layers to a fascinating true story.

    BRAVE, by Rose McGowan
    McGowan was born to members of the notorious Children of God cult before running away as a teenager and finding her way to Hollywood, where she quickly discovered that the sexism and exploitation of celebrity culture was a cult of its own. She’s been inspiration and provocateur ever since, unapologetically and controversially speaking her mind about Hollywood and her life as a female star. In the wake of her recent revelations about her abuse at the hands of Harvey Weinstein comes this frank memoir, which pulls no punches, and then some.

    Single State of Mind, by Andi Dorfman
    Bachelorette star Dorfman is back with a new memoir of life as a single celebrity in New York, pulling back the curtain on living as a reality star as well going behind the scenes on The Bachelor and The Bachelorette. Described as a real-life Sex and the City, Dorfman’s book has everything that her legions of fans crave.

    Jackie, Janet & Lee: The Secret Lives of Janet Auchincloss and Her Daughters Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Lee Radziwill, by J. Randy Taraborrelli
    There are plenty of biographies about Jackie Kennedy Onassis, mostly centered around her marriages to JFK and Aristotle Onassis and her extraordinary and tragic term as First Lady. Taraborelli’s book shifts the focus to the family, particularly the mother who taught Jackie and her sister Lee to walk in the most rarified circles. A socialite, a First Lady, and a princess, these three women walked the corridors of power in the 20th century.

    Whose story intrigues you most?

    The post The Best Biographies & Memoirs of January 2018 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 7:00 pm on 2017/12/18 Permalink
    Tags: , Biography, , james frey, papillon, superfudged   

    5 Hoax Memoirs Still Worth Reading 

    The fake memoir isn’t a new phenomenon; people have been embellishing and altering their life stories since the dawn of writing. One of the earliest examples is Maria Monk’s The Awful Disclosures, published in 1836, which purported to describe her experiences in a convent where the nuns were sexually abused by priests. It is now considered to be more or less entirely made up.

    Usually the revelation that a memoir was falsified casts a shadow on a book’s rep, especially one valued mainly for the sensational nature of the story. But every now and then, a memoir that turns out to be fake retains enough great writing and interesting ideas that it’s still worth reading despite its fraudulent nature—you just have to approach them as novels instead. These five “memoirs” were faked to some degree, but they’re still worth reading.

    A Million Little Pieces, by James Frey
    The most famous hoax memoir of recent history, Frey’s hugely successful book started off life as a novel he couldn’t sell. The story of Frey’s supposed battles with addiction, time spent in rehab and jail, and his relationship with a girlfriend who eventually killed herself—it’s all fodder for a powerful story. Frey clearly had serious problems, and although he’s admitted to changing and exaggerating huge portions of the book (journalists have tried repeatedly to find any evidence for some of the most outlandish sections without success), the parts  that illustrates the way addiction takes over and then destroys lives ring powerfully true. Frey didn’t suffer overmuch for his crimes; aside from a bit of public humiliation and a legendary Oprah shaming, his book still sells, and he still writes and runs his own publishing company.

    Papillon, by Henri Charrière
    Charrière was, in fact, known as Papillon, a nickname given to him because of the butterfly tattoo he sported, and he did spend a lot of time in prisons around the world. His supposed memoir, Papillon, tells the story of a super-criminal who couldn’t be held, a man who suffered incredibly in brutal prison systems rife with abuse and mental torture—and a man who escaped from them effortlessly, often in extremely improbable ways (you try building a raft out of coconuts and let us know how it goes for you). Still, despite plenty of research that proved very little of his memoir is the straight story, Charrière went to his grave insisting this memoir is absolutely true. It’s a great read, even if the main character—Charrière himself, of course—comes off as an insufferably arrogant man. It’s a story of the durability of the human spirit, no matter how confined; Charrière manages to make breaking out of prison sound like the sort of thing everyone should do at least once in their lives.

    Go Ask Alice, by Beatrice Sparks
    Go Ask Alice is still officially listed as being an anonymous memoir of a teenage girl who descends into a hell of drug abuse, prostitution, and homelessness. Written during a time of moral panic among suburban parents who feared the 1960s sex-and-drugs culture was going to seduce their kids, the book raised eyebrows with its depiction of the narrator’s rapid descent into full-blown drug addiction, even if the way she hits every branch on the misery tree on her way down to the bottom is a bit on the nose for what is ultimately an anti-drug fable. Sparks, who wrote countless other fictional diaries, does succeed in capturing the lazy way disaffected youth can get into trouble through simple boredom and peer pressure, and the story is much more layered and brutal than you might imagine. That’s likely why it’s still in print more than 40 years later, and long after it’s veracity as a memoir was debunked.

    The Hand that Signed the Paper, by Helen Dale
    Helen Dale wrote a pretty great novel about a Ukrainian family, oppressed and abused by Soviet rule, who initially welcome the Nazis as liberators and even happily volunteer to serve in the German army. Although she never claimed it was a straightforward memoir, she did publish it under a pseudonym using a Ukrainian name and lied that her family’s own experiences informed it, and stated outright that the events described did happen. All of that was a lie. The novel’s unflinching depiction of the attitudes of the Ukrainian characters has caused many to label it antisemitic, but if you take the book to be a complete work of fiction, it’s still a powerful historical story with some basis in reality, and a thought-provoking and often emotionally powerful read. Questions of veracity aside, it was an award-winning and well-reviewed book in its initial release.

    Odd Man Out, by Matt McCarthy
    McCarthy was drafted by the Anaheim Angels in 2002 but never made it to the major leagues. He wrote Odd Man Out and sold it as a 100 percent truthful memoir of his time in the minors, and it caused a sensation due to his frank depiction of drug use, racism, and other unsavory aspects of low-level pro baseball. While he may have captured the atmosphere accurately, he certainly fabricated many of the events he described, making the rookie mistake (see what we did there) of actually naming names—making it very easy for reporters to prove that many of the people weren’t even on the team when McCarthy claimed they were doing outrageous things. Despite the falsehoods, McCarthy’s descriptions of minor league life ring true in general, and offer an interesting perspective on a career in pro sports that isn’t going to end in the Hall of Fame.

    The post 5 Hoax Memoirs Still Worth Reading appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2017/12/15 Permalink
    Tags: , Biography, , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over 

    Snuggling up with a good book in the cold is one of winter’s foremost delights. Cookbooks aren’t necessarily books readers can get lost in, but food lovers can stick to reading on their favorite subject by enjoying a flavor-packed food memoir. Grab a throw blanket and a cup of tea, and enjoy one of these satiating personal histories.

    Two Towns in Provence: Map of Another Town and a Considerable Town, by M. F. K. Fisher
    Like helpings, the only thing better than one memoir is two, particularly when written by preeminent food writer, M. F. K. Fisher. Having penned 27 fantastic books, Fisher is among the most renowned American food writers. Her culinary travels through California and France provided inspiration for her food anecdotes. Here, her tale of two towns, Map of Another Town and A Considerable Town are paired together, taking the reader to picturesque places like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. These memoirs will have you dreaming of the sights and smells of the south of France, if not booking a plane ticket.

    32 Yolks: From My Mother’s Table to Working the Line, by Eric Ripert and Veronica Chambers
    Foodies flock to NYC to taste Eric Ripert’s Michelin-starred restaurant, Le Bernardin. At the upscale eatery, the Chef Ripert spoils and enchants diners with an array of delectable seafood, every bite a taste of la dolce vita. But Ripert’s life wasn’t always easy, and it was in his at times challenging childhood he found solace in his innate gift: cooking. The story is at once a tale about food and coming of age in the kitchen. And the book is much more accessible (and affordable) than a dinner at Le Bernardin.

    Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, & Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living, by Julie Powell
    Some people are more cinephiles than bibliophiles. But usually those film buffs enjoying reading the book the movie is based off of after having first savored the film. There are not that many food books as fiction books that are turned into movies but as luck would have it, this food blog/memoir was turned into a film: Julie and Julia. Starring Meryl Streep as the unique and charismatic food personality, Julia Child, the story follows a young woman, Julie, as she commits to cooking Child’s dishes daily for a year. Both movie and book are a delight, but we believe the book is best served before the film.

    Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin
    New Orleans is one of those cities that instantly conjures up images of food and fine dining. Just the mention of  “The Big Easy” sends déjà vu taste buds and smells swirling through the mind. And couple that with the surname, “Brennan,” well; brunch is pretty much served. The Brennan family of New Orleans has a long history as restaurateurs, among the most eminent is the inimitable Ella Brennan, leader of Commander’s Palace, first established in 1893. The book, whose colors recall the restaurant with its vibrant blue and white, follows the story of Brennan’s life and career. Brennan co-wrote it with one of her daughters (and restaurant partners), Ti Adelaide Martin.

    Eating Animals, by Jonathan Safran Foer
    If you like your memoir with a slice of investigative journalism, then Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is the book for you. Do not sit down expecting a nostalgic recount of the days of old. Rather, the book dips into the more sour side of eating—the farming and treatment of animals. Foer makes an empathetic storyteller, he himself having attempted (and not always succeeded) to go vegetarian, battling his love of meat against his respect for animals. The book is a lot to digest, but is worth every word.

    What food memoirs have you savored?

    The post 5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2017/12/15 Permalink
    Tags: , Biography, , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over 

    Snuggling up with a good book in the cold is one of winter’s foremost delights. Cookbooks aren’t necessarily books readers can get lost in, but food lovers can stick to reading on their favorite subject by enjoying a flavor-packed food memoir. Grab a throw blanket and a cup of tea, and enjoy one of these satiating personal histories.

    Two Towns in Provence: Map of Another Town and a Considerable Town, by M. F. K. Fisher
    Like helpings, the only thing better than one memoir is two, particularly when written by preeminent food writer, M. F. K. Fisher. Having penned 27 fantastic books, Fisher is among the most renowned American food writers. Her culinary travels through California and France provided inspiration for her food anecdotes. Here, her tale of two towns, Map of Another Town and A Considerable Town are paired together, taking the reader to picturesque places like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. These memoirs will have you dreaming of the sights and smells of the south of France, if not booking a plane ticket.

    32 Yolks: From My Mother’s Table to Working the Line, by Eric Ripert and Veronica Chambers
    Foodies flock to NYC to taste Eric Ripert’s Michelin-starred restaurant, Le Bernardin. At the upscale eatery, the Chef Ripert spoils and enchants diners with an array of delectable seafood, every bite a taste of la dolce vita. But Ripert’s life wasn’t always easy, and it was in his at times challenging childhood he found solace in his innate gift: cooking. The story is at once a tale about food and coming of age in the kitchen. And the book is much more accessible (and affordable) than a dinner at Le Bernardin.

    Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, & Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living, by Julie Powell
    Some people are more cinephiles than bibliophiles. But usually those film buffs enjoying reading the book the movie is based off of after having first savored the film. There are not that many food books as fiction books that are turned into movies but as luck would have it, this food blog/memoir was turned into a film: Julie and Julia. Starring Meryl Streep as the unique and charismatic food personality, Julia Child, the story follows a young woman, Julie, as she commits to cooking Child’s dishes daily for a year. Both movie and book are a delight, but we believe the book is best served before the film.

    Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin
    New Orleans is one of those cities that instantly conjures up images of food and fine dining. Just the mention of  “The Big Easy” sends déjà vu taste buds and smells swirling through the mind. And couple that with the surname, “Brennan,” well; brunch is pretty much served. The Brennan family of New Orleans has a long history as restaurateurs, among the most eminent is the inimitable Ella Brennan, leader of Commander’s Palace, first established in 1893. The book, whose colors recall the restaurant with its vibrant blue and white, follows the story of Brennan’s life and career. Brennan co-wrote it with one of her daughters (and restaurant partners), Ti Adelaide Martin.

    Eating Animals, by Jonathan Safran Foer
    If you like your memoir with a slice of investigative journalism, then Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is the book for you. Do not sit down expecting a nostalgic recount of the days of old. Rather, the book dips into the more sour side of eating—the farming and treatment of animals. Foer makes an empathetic storyteller, he himself having attempted (and not always succeeded) to go vegetarian, battling his love of meat against his respect for animals. The book is a lot to digest, but is worth every word.

    What food memoirs have you savored?

    The post 5 Delicious Food Memoirs to Drool Over appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel