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  • Jeff Somers 4:12 pm on 2018/11/07 Permalink
    Tags: , allen eskens, anne perry, , , , , , , mike lupica, , ,   

    November’s Best Mysteries 

    November officially kicks off the holiday season, which means you’re putting together shopping lists and trying to pick out the perfect gifts for everybody. You have to practice self-care, though, which means that aside from choosing the best mysteries to give to your loved ones as gifts, you have to pick out a few for yourself. This week’s best mysteries include new adventures from the best in the business, including the very real Janet Evanovich and Louise Penny and the very fictional Jessica Fletcher.

    Look Alive Twenty-Five, by Janet Evanovich
    Twenty-five books in and Stephanie Plum is going strong as ever, still tackling gritty mysteries with humor, smarts, and competence to spare. This time around Plum’s attention is drawn to the Red River Deli in Trenton, famous for its pastrami and its cole slaw. More recently, it’s become famous because of its disappearing managers—three in the last month, each leaving behind a single shoe. Lula tries to convince Stephanie it’s aliens abducting humans for experiments, but Stephanie figures on something a little less exotic—and takes over running the business herself in order to get to the bottom of things. It’s certainly not the first time Plum has put herself in danger for the sake of a case—and she can only hope it won’t be her last.

    Kingdom of the Blind, by Louise Penny
    Penny’s 14th book featuring Chief Inspector Gamache begins with the retired chief of the Sûreté du Québec receiving the surprising news that he’s one of three executors of the estate of an elderly woman he’s never met. With his suspension and the events that led to it still under excruciatingly slow investigation, Gamache agrees to participate, even thought the terms of the will are outlandish, leading him and his fellow executors to wonder if the old woman was mentally sound. When a dead body turns up, however, it prompts Gamache to reconsider—because the terms of the will suddenly seem much less strange, and much more ominous. Meanwhile the drugs he allowed to remain on the streets as part of his plan to destroy the drug cartels are still out there—and if he doesn’t find them, and soon, there will be devastation throughout the city. For once, Chief Inspector Gamache is something wholly unexpected: desperate.

    Robert B. Parker’s Blood Feud, by Mike Lupica
    In response to a request from Robert B. Parker’s fans, veteran sportswriter-turned-novelist Lupica brings the late Parker’s only female private eye, Sunny Randall, back in this exciting, fast-paced seventh novel. Sunny—hypercompetent as a private detective—is struggling with her emotional state as she deals with being divorced but still drawn to her ex-husband, Richie Burke. Richie, the son of local mobster Desmond Burke, gets shot in the back one night—but the shooter makes it clear that he was left alive on purpose, and that it’s part of a grudge against the Burkes in general. A few nights later, his bookie uncle Peter is shot dead. The Burkes want to handle this on their own, but Sunny can’t stay out of it, even when her investigation beings her repeatedly up against old foe Albert Antonioni, supposedly retired after trying to bump Sunny off. Lupica does Parker proud with this energized, smart story, and Sunny’s fans old and new will be very happy with the way everything turns out.

    The Colors of All the Cattle, by Alexander McCall Smith
    The nineteenth novel featuring Mwa Ramotswe and her fellow investigators and residents of the town of Gaborone is as delightful and insightful as ever. Ramotswe is persuaded to run for a seat on the city council when it’s revealed that the arch-enemy of her agency partner Grace, Vera Sephotho, is in the race. Vera supports a terrible initiative to build a luxury hotel next to the town’s cemetery, which gives Mwa Ramotswe the moral edge in the race, but her compulsively honest answers to questions might complicate her campaign. Meanwhile, the agency deals with the investigation of a hit-and-run case even as their assistant Charlie, finally growing up, engages in his first true romance.

    A Christmas Revelation, by Anne Perry
    Perry’s tradition of offering a Christmas-themed Victorian mystery continues, this time telling the story of nine-year old Worm, an orphan living in mid-19th century London. Worm has found an ersatz family at Hester Monk’s clinic, located at the site of a former brothel, and especially in the sweet Claudine Burroughs and the sour Squeaky Robinson, who once worked at the brothel and now serves as the clinic’s bookkeeper. One day Worm sees a woman on the street who immediately infatuates him with her gentle visage—only to be apparently attacked and kidnapped. Distressed, Worm enlists the reluctant but experienced Squeaky to help him track down the lady and ride to her rescue—but of course, twists and turns abound as they walk the cobble stone streets in search of clues.

    Murder, She Wrote: Manuscript for Murder, by Jessica Fletcher and Jon Land
    Fans of the classic TV show and fans of great mysteries alike will be thrilled with Land’s second outing with writer and detective Jessica Fletcher. In New York for a meeting with her publisher, Fletcher is approached by a fellow writer named Thomas Rudd who tells her he thinks their publisher, Lane Barfield, is skimming money form their royalties—and later turns up dead in a suspicious gas explosion. When she meets with Barfield, however, he can only talk about a new novel he’s acquired from an unknown writer named Benjamin Tally, and he gives Fletcher a copy of it for her opinion. Then the bodies begin to pile up: Barfield turns up dead, an apparent if unlikely suicide, and two other authors who saw the manuscript are dead as well. When Fletcher herself is attacked and left for dead before she can finish the book, she seeks out allies and digs in like only Jessica Fletcher can.

    The Shadows We Hide, by Allen Eskens
    Report Joe Talbert, Jr. reads about a man named Joe ‛Toke’ Talbert, recently murdered in a small Minnesota town. Joe never knew his father, and he wonders if this man might turn out to be his namesake. He begins looking into the man’s life and murder, and finds no shortage of suspects who might have wanted Toke dead, as he was by all reports a terrible human being and worse father. Toke’s wife died shortly before under suspicious circumstances, leaving Toke with a large inheritance, making the solution to his murder an even more complex puzzle—especially since, if Toke is in fact Joe’s father, the money would legally be his. Part personal journey, part grim mystery, Joe learns as much about himself as he does about the man who might be his father as the mystery takes a few delirious twists before the surprising, satisfying ending.

    The Whispered Word, by Ellery Adams
    Nora Pennington and the Secret, Book, and Scone Society return to run Miracle Books and feed the soul with the perfect choice of novel. A new business opens in town, Virtual Genie, offering cash for unwanted goods that it then sells on the Internet. Everyone thinks owner Griffin Kingsley is a perfect gentleman, but Nora isn’t sold. And when an obviously terrified young girl named Abilene wearing a hospital bracelet and some bruises turns up hiding in the store, followed by a pair of suspicious deaths, Nora begins to suspect that Abilene is the next target—and that Griffin Kingsley’s arrival at the same time may not be as much of a coincidence as it first appears.

    Whether it’s holiday stress, plane ride downtime, or the simple pleasures in life, nothing beats a good supply of mysteries to feed the soul while the cold weather moves in. Grab a bunch from this list and thank us later!

    Shop all mystery & crime >

    The post November’s Best Mysteries appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 5:00 pm on 2018/08/31 Permalink
    Tags: a willing murder, ann cleeves, anne perry, christmas cake murder, , dark tide rising, depth of winter, , field of bones, george pelecanos, , , joanna fluke, john woman, , leverage in death, , , , robert b. parker's colorblind, sofie kelly, the cats came back, the man who came uptown, , , wild fire: a shetland island mystery   

    September’s Best New Mysteries 

    The days are growing shorter and brisker, and fall is in the air. There’s no better time to relax on the porch (or to claim the comfiest chair in the living room) while you enjoy one of these shiny new mysteries.

    Leverage in Death (In Death Series #47), by J. D. Robb
    Robb ratchets up the tension in the 47th installment of her long-running but still incredibly gripping series. When businessman Paul Rogan detonates a suicide vest he’s wearing during an innocuous merger meeting in a Manhattan office building, killing himself and nearly a dozen others, Lt. Eve Dallas is left wondering whether this was as an act of terrorism, or a homicide. Delving into Rogan’s past and interviewing his surviving wife and daughter leads Dallas down a nightmarish path cut by villains who will do anything to get what they want.

    Robert B. Parker’s Colorblind, by Reed Farrel Coleman
    Jesse Stone is back to work after some time in rehab, but his latest case is more than he bargained for. A slew of crimes that appear racially motivated, including an African American woman’s murder, is leaving everyone shaken, and it hits close to home when Jesse’s deputy, Alisha, the first black woman on the Paradise police force, becomes the victim of an extremely devious frame-up. In the meantime, Jesse has taken a young troublemaker who has recently rolled into town under his sleeve, but it’s a decision he may come to regret.

    Depth of Winter (Walt Longmire Series #14), by Craig Johnson
    In the terrifying new novel in the beloved Walt Longmire series, Walt’s worst nightmare is realized when his daughter, Cady, is kidnapped by a vicious Mexican drug cartel—and they’re auctioning her off to the highest bidder among Walt’s (many, many) sworn enemies. When neither the American nor the Mexican governments offer much assistance, Walt must head off into the 110-degree Northern Mexican desert by himself to find her.

    Field of Bones (Joanna Brady Series #18), by J. A. Jance
    Sheriff Joanna Brady is on maternity leave, but a frightening serial killer’s gruesome shenanigans across several jurisdictions draw her back on the case (although tending to a newborn and reading through the cold cases in her father’s diaries is interesting, a chilling serial homicide case is just as compelling in its own way).

    Christmas Cake Murder (Hannah Swensen Series #23), by Joanna Fluke
    Fans of this delicious series will relish traveling back in time with Hannah Swensen to a Christmas many years ago, where they will witness the origin of Hannah’s bake shop, the Cookie Jar. Hannah is feeling stalled in life and in love, and she throws herself gratefully into the recreation of a marvelous Christmas Ball in honor of elderly local hospice resident Essie Granger. But soon Hannah finds herself sucked into Essie’s old notebooks, which detail a fascinating mystery story that soon becomes more than just a story—and more deadly, too.

    A Willing Murder, by Jude Deveraux
    After Sara Medlar retires from a highly successful career as a romance novelist, she finds herself getting restless. So she takes on a very large (as in, mansion-sized) renovation project in her hometown of Lachlan, Florida, but it ends up being a bit more than she can manage. Fortunately her niece Kate has accepted a job in Lachlan and needs a place to stay, so she gives Sara some much-needed company. Before long sparks begin to fly between Kate and another houseguest, contractor Jackson Wyatt. Unfortunately, before long the unlikely trio unearths a pair of long-buried skeletons, which shake the town up in a bad way. Beloved romance author Jude Deveraux brings us her very first mystery novel and it’s a perfect blend of romance and suspense.

    John Woman, by Walter Mosley
    A deliciously offbeat and unexpected novel of ideas from a master of the mystery genre, John Woman tells the story of an ordinary young man who reinvents himself as John Woman, history professor with revolutionary ideas about controlling the narrative of history in order to command your own destiny. But a dark incident from his past—and shadowy individuals who may be using their knowledge of it to control him—threaten the new life he has built for himself.

    The Cats Came Back (Magical Cats Mystery Series #10), by Sofie Kelly
    Mayville Heights, MN librarian Kathleen Paulson and her magical cats, Hercules and Owen, are excited for the town’s upcoming music festival—until a dead body turns up by the river. Sadly, the victim is a friend of Kathleen’s, but she also bears a striking resemblance to a singer who was slated to perform at the festival. Was she really the target, or was this a case of mistaken identity? Fans of this long-running series (even those who aren’t cat people!) will lap up this entertaining installment.

    Mrs. Jeffries and the Three Wise Women (Mrs. Jeffries Series #36), by Emily Brightwell
    Christopher Gilhaney seems to have made enemies at a recent Guy Fawkes Night dinner party—judging by the fact that he was shot dead later that night. Granted, he did spend the evening insulting every guest in attendance, to the mortification of hostess Abigail Chase. The mystery of Christopher’s murder, which is suspected to be related to a botched robbery, remains unsolved six weeks later, and Inspector Witherspoon’s expertise is called upon. But the holidays are approaching, and Witherspoon and his household at large are concerned that their holiday plans are at risk of being interrupted. Can they put this one to bed, or will the truth forever elude them?

    Dark Tide Rising (William Monk Series #26), by Anne Perry
    When a wealthy businessman’s wife is kidnapped in broad daylight, he asks the Thames River Police to be there for her ransom exchange. Monk assembles a trusted team of men, but when the exchange goes awry, he is left wondering who gave away knowledge of their plans. As he begins to dig into the pasts of some of his most seemingly faithful colleagues, he uncovers dangerous secrets that put more just their working relationships at risk.

    Wild Fire: A Shetland Island Mystery (Shetland Island Series #8), by Ann Cleeves
    An English family moves to the Shetland islands, hoping to build a better life for their autistic son—but when the body of a local young nanny is discovered, hanging in their old barn, it sparks rumors of an affair and throws the entire family into suspicion. When Det. Insp. Jimmy Perez is called in to investigate, his boss, Willow Reeves, returns to head the investigation, which forces him to confront their rather complicated relationship. This compelling installment may be Perez’s final case, and fans would do well not to miss it.

    The Man Who Came Uptown, by George Pelecanos
    Like many inmates, Michael Hudson is passing the time in prison by reading voraciously—and lucky for him, the prison librarian, Anna, has taken a shine to him and is keeping him supplied with books. Also lucky for Michael is the fact that a witness in his trial has been discouraged from testifying, and he is soon free. Now that he’s back out in the world, Michael discovers that thanks to his literary education, it’s a much broader world than he remembers. But he’s torn between the temptation to stay straight, and his allegiance to the man who helped get him released. You’ll race through this fascinating examination of redemption and hard choices.

    What mystery novels are you excited to read this month?

    The post September’s Best New Mysteries appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 4:00 pm on 2018/03/30 Permalink
    Tags: after anna, , , anne perry, , cave of bones, , , , , , , new and mysterious, richard jury series, the good pilot peter woodhouse, , the sixth day, , twenty-one days   

    The Best New Mysteries of March 2018 

    Greetings, gumshoes! March may have gone out like a lamb, but April’s new crop of mysteries is roaring in. From a gritty retelling of Shakespeare’s Macbeth by the peerless Jo Nesbø, to the story of a long-lost daughter whose sudden reappearance brings nothing but trouble, this month’s crop of whodunits is ready to surprise you with twists and turns you didn’t see coming.

    After Anna, by Lisa Scottoline
    In this tense family drama, Noah Alderman, a widower with a young son, gets a second chance at love when he marries Maggie Ippolitti, who is wonderful with his child and gives him the happy family he has longed for. When Maggie’s teenage daughter Anna, whom she hasn’t seen since she was an infant, reappears in her life, Maggie is also overjoyed that she gets a second chance at being the parent to Anna that she has always longed to be. But Anna’s reappearance upsets all of their lives, as she manipulates Noah and Maggie and pits them against each other, destabilizing their happy marriage. When Anna is murdered, Noah stands accused of the crime. Maggie doesn’t want to believe it, but the evidence against him is overwhelming…until she begins to dig deeper into Anna’s past, and uncovers darker secrets than she could have imagined.

    The Sixth Day (A Brit in the FBI Series #5), by Catherine Coulter and J. T. Ellison
    Things are heating up in the A Brit in the FBI Series—the fifth installment opens with a number of deaths of well-known politicians, which authorities are trying to claim are merely coincidental—until a drone is spotted near the steps of 10 Downing street when the German Vice-Chancellor is murdered. It’s clear there’s a hidden agenda behind these killings, and special agents Nicholas Drummond and Michaela Caine must track down a descendant of Vlad the Impaler, whom they believe is hell-bent on attacking London.

    The Knowledge (Richard Jury Series #24), by Martha Grimes
    When Richard Jury learns that a gambler-slash-astrophysics professor at Columbia he’s become friendly with was murdered in front of a casino-slash-gallery called the Artemis Club, he’s furious. When he learns that the murderer jumped into a cab directly after committing the crime, Jury follows that lead and finds himself in an investigation that leads from Tanzanian gem mines to a cabbies-only pub so secretive that not even the police can get the location out of anyone. Grimes’s funny, offbeat Richard Jury series crackles with wit and is packed with bizarro characters.

    The Good Pilot Peter Woodhouse, by Alexander McCall Smith
    A moving story of love and friendship set against the tumultuous backdrop of World War II, this standalone novel is by the bestselling author of the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, and features his charming, deftly-drawn characters and intricate plotting. A young woman named Val is working on an English farm when she crosses paths with a U. S. Air Force pilot named Mike. When Val rescues a dog from an abusive owner, she finds him a home on Mike’s air force base, and she and Mike fall in love. The dog, Peter Woodhouse, becomes a fixture on the air force base, but disaster strikes as the war drags on, and when Mike and Peter Woodhouse draw a German corporal into their lives, it sets off a series of events that challenges their notions of friendship, loyalty, and love.

    Macbeth, by Jo Nesbø
    Brilliant thriller writer Jo Nesbø (author of the Harry Hole series) has written a fascinating entry in the inventive Hogarth Shakespeare series, in which modern authors update classic Shakespeare plays. Nesbo sets Macbeth in a dilapidated town in Scotland in the 1970s that is plagued by drugs and corruption. Duncan, the chief of police, is working to stem the tide of both and is assisted by SWAT team head Macbeth. But vicious local drug lord Hecate has his own agenda, and uses pressure and manipulation to push Macbeth, already unstable and paranoid, into serving his own terrible ends.

    Cave of Bones (Leaphorn, Chee and Manualito Series #4), by Anne Hillerman
    When a young participant in a character-building program returns from an outdoor trek shaken and upset, Tribal Police Officer Bernadette Manualito, who happens to be visiting the program, questions her and discovers that she came across a body in the rugged wilderness of New Mexico. Even more disturbing is the possibility that the body may belong to a missing program instructor. When Bernie investigates further, she discovers that this missing persons case may be connected to a very old one in which Joe Leaphorn was involved. In the meantime, her husband Jim Chee is dealing with a nightmare scenario of his own: a violent man he sent to prison on domestic violence charges is out—and he’s taken up with Bernie’s sister, Darleen. Navigating this extremely tricky emotional territory is going to push Jim to his limits.

    Twenty-One Days (Daniel Pitt Series #1), by Anne Perry
    It’s 1910, and young lawyer Daniel Pitt has some rather large shoes to fill, as the son of the esteemed Thomas and Charlotte Pitt (stars of Perry’s long-running series by the same name). Hungry to make a name for himself, junior barrister Daniel takes on the case of one Russell Graves, a biographer who has been found guilty of his wife’s murder. Unless Daniel can find the real killer, Graves will hang in only three weeks. But as Daniel digs deeper into the case, his investigations bring him closer to a colleague of his father’s, and his loyalty to the law is soon pitted against his duty to his own family—and to an innocent man whose life is on the line.

    What mysteries are you excited to read in April?

    The post The Best New Mysteries of March 2018 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 5:00 pm on 2017/11/29 Permalink
    Tags: , , anne perry, barbara ross, cheryl honigford, , eggnog murder, , hark the herald angels slay, homicide for the holidays, , lee hollis, leslie meier, , , , , thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd, , vicki delany   

    The Best New Mysteries of December 2017 

    Holiday-themed mysteries are lighting up the shelves this month, giving armchair gumshoes the opportunity to delve into halls decked with murder, and explore the hazardous properties of eggnog. From standalone story collections, to new titles in beloved long-running series, we’ve got a collection of new mysteries that will knock your reindeer-patterned socks off.

    Homicide for the Holidays, by Cheryl Honigford
    When burgeoning radio star Vivian Witchell stumbles upon a stack of cash in a locked drawer in her late father’s desk, she takes the opportunity to hire dashing detective Charlie Haverman to help her investigate. Viv begins to wonder if she should have left well enough alone when the trail of clues begins to point toward her beloved, upstanding father’s potential involvement with none other than Al Capone. The second novel in the Viv and Charlie Mystery series, set in 1938 Chicago, will delight fans of period mysteries featuring colorful characters.

    Eggnog Murder, by Leslie Meier, Lee Hollis, and Barbara Ross
    You’ll never look at eggnog the same way after enjoying this creamy collection of stories spiked with murder and deceit. The famously unhealthy beverage is prominently featured in all three holiday-themed tales—and yes, it’s laced with poison in at least one story. This delicious tongue-in-cheek trio will help you get in the “bah, humbug!” spirit just in time for the holidays.

    Hark the Herald Angels Slay, by Vicki Delany
    As one might expect, the town of Rudolph, NY is filled with the Christmas spirit all year long—but especially during the languid summer months, when Santa arrives on a boat to enjoy his summer vacation on the lake during a Christmas in July celebration. But when Max Folger, the ex-fiance of Merry Wilkinson, owner of Mrs. Claus’s Treasures, arrives in town as well, Merry is perturbed. It quickly becomes obvious that Max’s explanation for why he is there—that he’s working for a magazine that’s covering the festivities—is a ruse. Max is there for one reason and one reason only: To win Merry back. But that plan is derailed when he’s found dead, strangled in her store, and Merry’s busy to-do list includes catching a murderer.

    Murder for Christmas, by Francis Duncan
    Fans of good old fashioned murder mysteries in the style of Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot series will want to settle in for a long winter’s read with this sharp Christmas-themed tale. A number of guests have gathered at Benedict Grame’s country house for some holiday revels, including amateur investigator Mordecai Tremaine. As tends to happen when may different visitors gather together under one roof, tensions are high among the partygoers—and things take a grisly turn when the a body dressed as Santa Claus is found under the tree. Can Mordecai unmask the killer before anyone else gets a deadly, unwanted gift for Christmas?

    Thrice the Brinded Cat Hath Mew’d (Flavia de Luce Series #8), by Alan Bradley
    In the eighth novel in Bradley’s wickedly charming Flavia de Luce series, the young prodigy has been thrown out of Miss Bodycote’s Female Academy, and she’s delighted to be sailing back to England. Unfortunately she is greeted upon her return with the terrible news that her father is ill. Flavia’s irritating sisters and cousin are ruining her homecoming—until she stumbles upon the body of a lonely woodcarver in his cottage in the woods. The man is hanging upside down on the back of a door, the only living witness on the scene is an unperturbed cat. Things pick up quickly for Flavia after that, and fans of this precocious young detective will thoroughly enjoy her vigorous investigation into this shocking murder.

    Christmas Caramel Murder (Hannah Swensen Series), by Joanna Fluke
    Trouble is brewing this holiday season in Lake Eden, Minnesota. Hannah and her buddy Lisa are providing the refreshments for this year’s production of A Christmas Carol, but Lisa is not thrilled that her husband has been cast as Santa…and his ex-girlfriend as Mrs. Claus. Before the show can get off the ground, though, Mrs. Clause is found dead in the snow…in a costume that is definitely not g-rated. Everyone’s a suspect in this madcap mystery which comes with 12 bonus holiday recipes from The Cookie Jar!

    A Christmas Return: A Novel, by Anne Perry
    When her investigation into a long-ago murder that sundered a friendship prompts the arrival of a mysterious and disturbing Christmas package on her doorstep, grandmother Mariah Ellison, the winning star of Perry’s newest Christmas-themed mystery, finds herself traveling to Surrey to pay a visit to her estranged friend, the murdered man’s widow, in an effort to make amends. There, she teams up with the victim’s grandson, who is hot on the killer’s (cold) trail. But now that they’re stirring up old crimes, every new lead puts this unlikely pair deeper into danger.

    Mrs. Jeffries and the Three Wise Women, by Emily Brightwell
    Christopher Gilhaney seems to have made enemies at a recent Guy Fawkes Night dinner party—judging by the fact that he was shot dead later that night. Granted, he did spend the evening insulting every guest in attendance, to the mortification of hostess Abigail Chase. The mystery of Christopher’s murder, which is suspected to be related to a botched robbery, remains unsolved six weeks later, and Inspector Witherspoon’s expertise is called upon. But the holidays are approaching, and Witherspoon and his household at large are concerned that their holiday plans are at risk of being interrupted. Can they put this one to bed, or will the truth forever elude them?

    The Usual Santas: A Collection of Soho Crime Christmas Capers, by Peter Lovesy
    What do you get for the crime reader who has everything? How do you get your favorite armchair gumshoe into the holiday spirit? And where can you find 18 hilarious, chilling, and bizarre stories centering around suspicious mall Santas, mysterious dinner parties, and stolen diamonds? The answer to all of these questions (and so many more) is The Usual Santas, A Collection of Soho Crime Christmas Capers, an anthology featuring stories by some of your favorite Soho Press authors and their most unexpectedly twisted Christmas-themed tales.

    How the Finch Stole Christmas, by Donna Andrews
    Eschewing his typical one man show, Meg’s husband has decided to launch a full-cast production of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol—starring their sons Josh and Jamie as Tiny Tim and young Scrooge of course, with Meg as stage manager. But the faded-star celebrity he brought into town to play Scrooge has brought a whole lot of trouble with him, in the form of a veritable zoo of animals, including a collection of finches. Fans of Andrews’ lively and charming Meg Langslow series will be crowing about the twisty 22nd installment.

    What mysteries are you digging into this December?

    The post The Best New Mysteries of December 2017 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Molly Schoemann-McCann 3:00 pm on 2017/10/31 Permalink
    Tags: , alexander mccann smith, anne canadeo, anne perry, city of lies, death in the stacks, , , hardcore twenty four, harry dolan, , , , knit to kill, , , , , sleep no more: 6 murderous tales, the house of unexpected sisters, the man in the crooked hat, , the trouble with twelfth grave darynda jones, ,   

    The Best New Mysteries of November 2017 

    Happy November, gumshoes! This month, take advantage of a long, relaxing holiday weekend (or, hours of traveling to see family and friends) to get in some uninterrupted reading time! Stock your nightstand or suitcase with a few of these page-turners and keep fall mysterious.

    Hardcore Twenty Four, by Janet Evanovich
    As her many fans are aware, to know Stephanie Plum is to love her. Evanovich’s long-running series following the madcap exploits of Jersey’s most illustrious bounty hunter takes a spooky turn when headless bodies begin turning up left and right. Although initially they’re corpses from the morgue, when a homeless man is found murdered and decapitated, someone has clearly upped their creepy game, Stephanie is compelled to take the case. In the meantime, she’s bunking with professional grave robber Simon Diggery and his pet python, and concerned about Grandma Mazur’s online dating escapades. Tall blonde and handsome Diesel is also back in town, which is stirring things up for Stephanie and her perennial paramours, sexy cop Joe Morelli and the enigmatic Ranger. Treat yourself to the latest mystery in the Plum series!

    City of Lies, by Victoria Thompson
    This exciting new series by the author of the Gaslight Mystery Series introduces readers to Elizabeth Miles, a savvy con artist in the Robin Hood vein who makes a brazen living divesting wealthy men of their fortunes…until the day she and her brother cross the wrong wealthy man and end up fleeing for their lives. Elizabeth stays safe by hiding among a group of privileged women whose activism she comes to admire…and in time her admiration extends to Gideon, the son of the group’s matriarch. But Elizabeth has been playing a deadly game, and her past is on the verge of catching up with her.

    The Man in the Crooked Hat, by Harry Dolan
    For two years, former Cop Jack Pellum has been searching for his wife’s murderer—whom he is convinced is a suspicious, fedora-wearing stranger he observed in her vicinity a few days before her death. But his obsessive quest, which has so far been fruitless, is jumpstarted when a message relating to the suicide of a local writer cracks the case wide open. And when Pellum crosses paths with Michael Underhill, a man with a dark hidden past who has everything to lose now that he’s found the perfect girlfriend, he finds himself closer than ever to finding out the truth, which is might be more than he can handle. A relentless plotter who sketches out unforgettable characters, if you’re a mystery fan and you haven’t read Dolan yet, put him on your list.

    How the Finch Stole Christmas, by Donna Andrews
    Eschewing his typical one man show, Meg’s husband has decided to launch a full-cast production of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol—starring their sons Josh and Jamie as Tiny Tim and young Scrooge of course, with Meg as stage manager. But the faded-star celebrity he brought into town to play Scrooge has brought a whole lot of trouble with him, in the form of a veritable zoo of animals, including a collection of finches. Fans of Andrews’ lively and charming Meg Langslow series will be crowing about the twisty 22nd installment.

    Knit to Kill, by Anne Canadeo
    Lucy Bing, a member of the storied Black Sheep knitting group, is getting married! To relax before the nuptials, the group accepts an invitation from Suzanne Cavanaugh’s friend Amy to spend the weekend on Osprey Island. But their relaxing getaway is ruined when an unpleasant local resident falls from a cliff to his death—and investigators believe he was murdered. When suspicion falls on Amy’s husband, it’s up to the Black Sheep knitters to untangle this unsettling mystery—which features a diabolical killer who always seems to be one step ahead.

    The Trouble with Twelfth Grave, by Darynda Jones
    Jones’ 12th Charley Davidson novel continues to blend mystery, romance, and the paranormal into a delightfully offbeat series. Son of Satan (and Charley’s husband) Reyes Farrow has been a bit peeved ever since she accidentally trapped him in Hell, which is understandable. But he’s not the only one making her life difficult these days—her startup PI venture is also keeping things very lively, and someone’s begun going after humans with an awareness of the supernatural. Can Charley protect them, despite her suspicion that she’s protecting them from someone she cares deeply about? If you haven’t yet met Charley Davidson, start at the beginning with the uproarious, award-winning First Grave on the Right.

    The House of Unexpected Sisters, by Alexander McCall Smith
    In this nuanced, slow burn mystery, the 18th in the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, Precious Ramotswe is approached by a woman fighting against what she calls an unfair dismissal from her job—for being rude to a customer. Although Mma Ramotswe initially takes her side, as more information comes to light, she begins to come to a troubling conclusion. Not only that, she discovers the existence of a local woman, a nurse, with the same last name of Ramotswe—which comes as something of a shock. When Mma Potokwani informs her that an unsavory man from her past has returned to Botswana, very likely in an effort to deliberately seek her out, Mma Ramotswe realizes she has her work cut out for her when it comes to unraveling the mysteries of her past and present, which have become entangled together.

    Sleep No More: 6 Murderous Tales, by P. D. James
    This cunning assortment of previously uncollected stories from the indomitable author of Death Comes to Pemberley is filled with tales of crimes committed long ago, complete with the chilling rationalizations that so often accompany them. Take a deep dive into the heart of a killer, and explore the push-pull in the minds of murderers, witnesses, orchestrators of the perfect crime, and unwitting victims. James’s formidable talent shines just even more brightly in her shorter works.

    A Christmas Return: A Novel, by Anne Perry
    When her investigation into a long-ago murder that sundered a friendship prompts the arrival of a mysterious and disturbing Christmas package on her doorstep, grandmother Mariah Ellison, the winning star of Perry’s newest Christmas-themed mystery, finds herself traveling to Surrey to pay a visit to her estranged friend, the murdered man’s widow, in an effort to make amends. There, she teams up with the victim’s grandson, who is hot on the killer’s (cold) trail. But now that they’re stirring up old crimes, every new lead puts this unlikely pair deeper into danger.

    Death in the Stacks, by Jenn McKinlay
    Brier Creek Library’s annual Dinner in the Stacks is a delightful fundraising event that should be lifting the spirits of the library’s staff—who instead find themselves under the thumb of miserable new library board president Olive Boyle, who is ruining everything. When Olive threatens bright new hire Paula, Lindsey Norris berates her—and she fears repercussions on the night of the big event. However, Olive is found dead in the middle of Dinner in the Stacks, with nonother than Paula crouching over her. Can Lindsey clear her name, or will Paula get the book thrown at her? Don’t miss the eighth book in this charming series for mystery-minded bibliophiles.

    Parting Shot, by Linwood Barclay
    A young man swears he has no memory of stealing a Porsche and murdering a girl while inebriated—an act which devastated the small community of Promise Falls and unleashed a barrage of threats against his family. Against his better judgment, Cal Weaver reluctantly agrees to investigate the threats, but before long he finds himself sucked into a brutal quest for revenge.

    The Secret, Book & Scone Society, by Ellery Adams
    The first book in a new series that combines a few of everyone’s favorite things—books, baked goods, and deep, dark secrets. Nora Pennington resides in beautiful Miracle Springs, North Carolina, a place renowned for the healing properties of its hot springs. Nora owns Miracle books, and she has a talent for drawing out people’s stories about their lives—in exchange for her uncannily perfect book recommendations. When a businessman is found dead before he can keep his appointment with Nora, she forms the Secret, Book, and Scone Society, which gives members a place to turn for support and a feeling of camaraderie—as long as they first reveal their darkest secrets first. As the members of Nora’s club begin to investigate the businessman’s mysterious death, they discover a sense of community—along with some hidden dangers.

    What mysteries are you excited about this month?

    The post The Best New Mysteries of November 2017 appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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