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  • Lauren Passell 1:30 pm on 2017/07/20 Permalink
    Tags: , anna karenina, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    DO NOT READ THIS POST: The 10 Biggest Book Spoilers, Ever 

    Warning: if you like to be surprised, stop reading right now. Get a glass of water or look at Buzzfeed or start working on your memoir.

    But if you’re curious about these books and their kick-to-the-stomach endings, then by all means, read on. (Because I’m not completely cruel, I’ve whited out the spoilers—just highlight the empty space to see the hidden words.)

    Don’t say we didn’t warn you…

    The Sinner, by Petra Hammesfahr
    One of the best examples of a “whydunnit” in recent years, German author Hammesfahr’s twisty novel (soon to air as a miniseries on USA starring Jessica Biel) is largely told in flashback after Cora Bender, a seemingly normal mother and housewife, inexplicably stabs a man to death while on a beach picnic with her family. Cora confesses readily and claims to have no idea why she just committed homicide—but a patient policeman thinks there’s more to the story, and slowly susses out the truth—Cora’s younger sister was born extremely ill, and her mother became obsessed with caring for her, forcing her father to share a room with Cora, resulting in a creepily close relationship between the two that comes as close to abuse as possible without crossing that final line. Her sister Magdalena isn’t as innocent as she seems—despite her frailty, she manipulates Cora and also has an intensely, inappropriately intimate relationship with her. When Cora is 19, she takes Magdalena with her to meet a boy and his friends, not realizing that Magdalena is near death and wishes to die. Two of the boys rape Cora while the third has sex with Magdalena—who dies during the act, a specific piece of music playing on the radio. When Cora freaks out, one of the boys hits her in the head with an ashtray, and to cover up the crime, they hold Cora captive for six months. Years later, when the music plays again at the beach, Cora snaps, and strikes out with a knife.

    Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card
    In Ender’s Game, the survival of the human race depends on Ender Wiggin, the child genius recruited for military training by the government… But while you (and Ender) believe he is fighting in mind simulation, in truth, he’s been  manipulated into fighting a real war, and actually killing the enemies, called buggers. He moves to a new colony planet with his sister, where he discovers that the buggers have created a space just for him. They didn’t know humans had intelligence, and they want to communicate with him. They show him what the war looked like from their point of view, and Ender and the buggers meet a point of understanding. He vows to live with them in peace, starts a new kind of religion, and writes a Bible-like book about the buggers, signing it Speaker For The Dead, which is a perfect segue into the Ender’s Game sequel.

    Atonement, by Ian McEwan
    Atonement is about misinterpretation and its repercussions. Briony observes her big sister Cecilia and Cecilia’s friend Robbie flirting and assumes something shameful has happened between them. She accuses Robbie of rape, and Robbie goes to jail. The story then follows Cecilia and Robbie as they go to war, fall in love, and wind up together forever. But at the end of the novel, you discover that Briony is actually the book’s narrator—and she’s been lying to you, too. She did accuse Robbie of rape, and he was jailed, but C & R didn’t live happily ever after together, after all. They both died in the war. Briony just wrote a happy ending for them to atone for her sins. That’s what she says, anyway. I’m not sure I believe anything she says anymore.

    And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie
    Most Agatha Christie novels leave you gobsmacked (The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, anyone?) But And Then There Were None is an absolute masterpiece of the whodunnit? formula. People invited to a party in a mansion keep on being murdered, but by whom? Well, if you’re sure you want to know…it was Judge Wargrave! Swaddled in a red curtain, he fakes his own death so that you, the reader, assume the murderer is someone else. But in a written confession at the end of the novel, you learn that he invited people to a desolate island in order to kill them one by one as punishment for the terrible things they’d done (and thought they got away with). Agatha, you sneak!

    Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn
    In Gone Girl, husband and wife Nick and Amy tell the story of their tumultuous marriage. We read what we think is Amy’s diary, and it condemns Nick as a violent jerk. We start to believe that Nick is responsible for Amy’s disappearance and possible death. But in a series of twists, the truth is revealed—Amy and Nick are both liars. Nick was having an affair, and Amy has been alive all along, on the lam, trying to frame Nick for her death. What we thought was her diary is actually a cunning trap: it’s a piece of fiction Amy wrote for the police to find. Amy kills a friend and returns to Nick, pregnant with his child, claiming she was kidnapped. Nick takes her back even though he knows the truth. In the end, Amy says she’s getting ready to become a mom by writing her abduction story. She should hang out with Briony.

    Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier
    Rebecca begins with one of the most mesmerizing first lines in literature—“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.” Things only get more interesting from there. The unnamed protagonist marries Maxim de Winter and moves into his home, called Manderley. She struggles to live up to the legend of Maxim’s late wife, Rebecca, who was seemingly perfect. Mrs. Danvers, the maid, almost gets the protagonist to kill herself in despair. But one day, divers find a sunken sailboat that belonged to Rebecca, revealing that Rebecca was murdered. Maxim then tells the truth: Rebecca was a wretched woman who had multiple affairs—one, with her cousin, resulted in her pregnancy. When Maxim found out, he killed her. In yet another twist, we find out that Rebecca was lying to Maxim—she wasn’t pregnant, but was actually dying of a terminal illness. In the end Old Danvers burns the joint down and disappears. As for Maxim and the protagonist? Happily ever after.

    The Dinner, by Herman Koch
    In Howard Koch’s The Dinner, two brothers and their wives sit down for a meal to discuss the horrific crime committed by their sons. The cousins have been caught on camera attacking a sleeping homeless woman in an ATM, throwing trash and a container of gasoline at her, and then burning her to death. Koch makes it clear that the family is bonded by a common sociopathology. The family argues over what to do. Serge, a politician, wants to come clean about the boys’ crime. Enraged by Serge’s stance, his sister-in-law Claire attacks him, disfiguring his face. Claire urges her nephews to “take care” of Beau, Serge and Babette’s adopted son, who witnessed the crime and is blackmailing the boys by threatening to reveal what they did. At the end of the novel, Beau is missing, and one of the cousins comes home covered in blood and mud. Wonder what happened to him?

    Harry Potter And The Deathly Hollows, by J.K. Rowling
    In J.K. Rowling’s seventh and final installment in the Harry Potter series, it’s revealed that Harry is a Horcrux, and must be killed before Voldemort can be. Viewing Snape’s memories in the Pensieve, Harry sees Snape talking to Dumbledore and finds out that Snape’s been his protector all this time. Snape loved Harry’s mother, Lily Potter, and spent his entire life spying on Voldemort for Dumbledore. Meanwhile, Dumbledore had been steering Harry to sacrifice himself for the larger good. Good and evil are blurred once again when Harry survives and learns that Dumbledore loved him, even if he expected him to sacrifice himself. Ms. Rowling, you’ve tricked us again.

    Rant, by Chuck Palahniuk
    This novel is an oral biography of protagonist Buster Landru “Rant” Casey, who has died. The reader gathers that Rant lived in a dystopian future where lower class citizens, called “nighttimers,” engaged in an activity called “Party Crashing,” a demolition derby where the crashers slam into each other in cars. The catch: if you crash in the right mental state, you’ll travel backwards in time. Rant disappears during Party Crashing, so his friends assume he’s time traveling. It takes some piecing together to figure out that Rant has been traveling back through time, raping his ancestors every thirteen years in an effort to become a superhuman. He isn’t one character; he is many. You can’t make this stuff up, but I guess Palahniuk did.

    Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy
    Anna Karenina is about a lot of stuff, but the heart of the story lies with Anna and her downward spiral from captivating spitfire to insecure shell of a woman. The book is beautifully written. Much of its pleasure comes from the character studies and quiet plotting. Then, in one of the most shocking moments in literature, Anna throws herself under a train and dies and you are stupefied. One of my friends always says, of Anna Karenina, “if you only read one ‘old’ book in your whole life, have it be this one.” Agreed.

    Something Happened, by Joseph Heller
    You’ll spend more than 400 pages reading about not much happening, rolling around in the protagonist’s brain as he goes to work, cares for his son, and fantasizes about the secretary. I can’t tell you what happens, though. That would ruin the book completely. 

    Kidding, obviously. The whole point, here, is to ruin your enjoyment of surprising books!

    Slocum’s son is a weakling because Slocum never made him go to gym class. This son gets hit by a car. In sadness and despair, Slocum hugs him to death. I mean that very literally, not the new kind of “literally.” Slocum hugs his son until he dies from squeezing. 

    Even with the surprises spoiled, reading these books is still a worthwhile endeavor. You’re going to read all of them, right? What’s the best book twist you’ve ever read?

    The post DO NOT READ THIS POST: The 10 Biggest Book Spoilers, Ever appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Lauren Passell 1:30 pm on 2017/07/20 Permalink
    Tags: , anna karenina, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    DO NOT READ THIS POST: The 10 Biggest Book Spoilers, Ever 

    Warning: if you like to be surprised, stop reading right now. Get a glass of water or look at Buzzfeed or start working on your memoir.

    But if you’re curious about these books and their kick-to-the-stomach endings, then by all means, read on. (Because I’m not completely cruel, I’ve whited out the spoilers—just highlight the empty space to see the hidden words.)

    Don’t say we didn’t warn you…

    The Sinner, by Petra Hammesfahr
    One of the best examples of a “whydunnit” in recent years, German author Hammesfahr’s twisty novel (soon to air as a miniseries on USA starring Jessica Biel) is largely told in flashback after Cora Bender, a seemingly normal mother and housewife, inexplicably stabs a man to death while on a beach picnic with her family. Cora confesses readily and claims to have no idea why she just committed homicide—but a patient policeman thinks there’s more to the story, and slowly susses out the truth—Cora’s younger sister was born extremely ill, and her mother became obsessed with caring for her, forcing her father to share a room with Cora, resulting in a creepily close relationship between the two that comes as close to abuse as possible without crossing that final line. Her sister Magdalena isn’t as innocent as she seems—despite her frailty, she manipulates Cora and also has an intensely, inappropriately intimate relationship with her. When Cora is 19, she takes Magdalena with her to meet a boy and his friends, not realizing that Magdalena is near death and wishes to die. Two of the boys rape Cora while the third has sex with Magdalena—who dies during the act, a specific piece of music playing on the radio. When Cora freaks out, one of the boys hits her in the head with an ashtray, and to cover up the crime, they hold Cora captive for six months. Years later, when the music plays again at the beach, Cora snaps, and strikes out with a knife.

    Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card
    In Ender’s Game, the survival of the human race depends on Ender Wiggin, the child genius recruited for military training by the government… But while you (and Ender) believe he is fighting in mind simulation, in truth, he’s been  manipulated into fighting a real war, and actually killing the enemies, called buggers. He moves to a new colony planet with his sister, where he discovers that the buggers have created a space just for him. They didn’t know humans had intelligence, and they want to communicate with him. They show him what the war looked like from their point of view, and Ender and the buggers meet a point of understanding. He vows to live with them in peace, starts a new kind of religion, and writes a Bible-like book about the buggers, signing it Speaker For The Dead, which is a perfect segue into the Ender’s Game sequel.

    Atonement, by Ian McEwan
    Atonement is about misinterpretation and its repercussions. Briony observes her big sister Cecilia and Cecilia’s friend Robbie flirting and assumes something shameful has happened between them. She accuses Robbie of rape, and Robbie goes to jail. The story then follows Cecilia and Robbie as they go to war, fall in love, and wind up together forever. But at the end of the novel, you discover that Briony is actually the book’s narrator—and she’s been lying to you, too. She did accuse Robbie of rape, and he was jailed, but C & R didn’t live happily ever after together, after all. They both died in the war. Briony just wrote a happy ending for them to atone for her sins. That’s what she says, anyway. I’m not sure I believe anything she says anymore.

    And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie
    Most Agatha Christie novels leave you gobsmacked (The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, anyone?) But And Then There Were None is an absolute masterpiece of the whodunnit? formula. People invited to a party in a mansion keep on being murdered, but by whom? Well, if you’re sure you want to know…it was Judge Wargrave! Swaddled in a red curtain, he fakes his own death so that you, the reader, assume the murderer is someone else. But in a written confession at the end of the novel, you learn that he invited people to a desolate island in order to kill them one by one as punishment for the terrible things they’d done (and thought they got away with). Agatha, you sneak!

    Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn
    In Gone Girl, husband and wife Nick and Amy tell the story of their tumultuous marriage. We read what we think is Amy’s diary, and it condemns Nick as a violent jerk. We start to believe that Nick is responsible for Amy’s disappearance and possible death. But in a series of twists, the truth is revealed—Amy and Nick are both liars. Nick was having an affair, and Amy has been alive all along, on the lam, trying to frame Nick for her death. What we thought was her diary is actually a cunning trap: it’s a piece of fiction Amy wrote for the police to find. Amy kills a friend and returns to Nick, pregnant with his child, claiming she was kidnapped. Nick takes her back even though he knows the truth. In the end, Amy says she’s getting ready to become a mom by writing her abduction story. She should hang out with Briony.

    Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier
    Rebecca begins with one of the most mesmerizing first lines in literature—“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.” Things only get more interesting from there. The unnamed protagonist marries Maxim de Winter and moves into his home, called Manderley. She struggles to live up to the legend of Maxim’s late wife, Rebecca, who was seemingly perfect. Mrs. Danvers, the maid, almost gets the protagonist to kill herself in despair. But one day, divers find a sunken sailboat that belonged to Rebecca, revealing that Rebecca was murdered. Maxim then tells the truth: Rebecca was a wretched woman who had multiple affairs—one, with her cousin, resulted in her pregnancy. When Maxim found out, he killed her. In yet another twist, we find out that Rebecca was lying to Maxim—she wasn’t pregnant, but was actually dying of a terminal illness. In the end Old Danvers burns the joint down and disappears. As for Maxim and the protagonist? Happily ever after.

    The Dinner, by Herman Koch
    In Howard Koch’s The Dinner, two brothers and their wives sit down for a meal to discuss the horrific crime committed by their sons. The cousins have been caught on camera attacking a sleeping homeless woman in an ATM, throwing trash and a container of gasoline at her, and then burning her to death. Koch makes it clear that the family is bonded by a common sociopathology. The family argues over what to do. Serge, a politician, wants to come clean about the boys’ crime. Enraged by Serge’s stance, his sister-in-law Claire attacks him, disfiguring his face. Claire urges her nephews to “take care” of Beau, Serge and Babette’s adopted son, who witnessed the crime and is blackmailing the boys by threatening to reveal what they did. At the end of the novel, Beau is missing, and one of the cousins comes home covered in blood and mud. Wonder what happened to him?

    Harry Potter And The Deathly Hollows, by J.K. Rowling
    In J.K. Rowling’s seventh and final installment in the Harry Potter series, it’s revealed that Harry is a Horcrux, and must be killed before Voldemort can be. Viewing Snape’s memories in the Pensieve, Harry sees Snape talking to Dumbledore and finds out that Snape’s been his protector all this time. Snape loved Harry’s mother, Lily Potter, and spent his entire life spying on Voldemort for Dumbledore. Meanwhile, Dumbledore had been steering Harry to sacrifice himself for the larger good. Good and evil are blurred once again when Harry survives and learns that Dumbledore loved him, even if he expected him to sacrifice himself. Ms. Rowling, you’ve tricked us again.

    Rant, by Chuck Palahniuk
    This novel is an oral biography of protagonist Buster Landru “Rant” Casey, who has died. The reader gathers that Rant lived in a dystopian future where lower class citizens, called “nighttimers,” engaged in an activity called “Party Crashing,” a demolition derby where the crashers slam into each other in cars. The catch: if you crash in the right mental state, you’ll travel backwards in time. Rant disappears during Party Crashing, so his friends assume he’s time traveling. It takes some piecing together to figure out that Rant has been traveling back through time, raping his ancestors every thirteen years in an effort to become a superhuman. He isn’t one character; he is many. You can’t make this stuff up, but I guess Palahniuk did.

    Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy
    Anna Karenina is about a lot of stuff, but the heart of the story lies with Anna and her downward spiral from captivating spitfire to insecure shell of a woman. The book is beautifully written. Much of its pleasure comes from the character studies and quiet plotting. Then, in one of the most shocking moments in literature, Anna throws herself under a train and dies and you are stupefied. One of my friends always says, of Anna Karenina, “if you only read one ‘old’ book in your whole life, have it be this one.” Agreed.

    Something Happened, by Joseph Heller
    You’ll spend more than 400 pages reading about not much happening, rolling around in the protagonist’s brain as he goes to work, cares for his son, and fantasizes about the secretary. I can’t tell you what happens, though. That would ruin the book completely. 

    Kidding, obviously. The whole point, here, is to ruin your enjoyment of surprising books!

    Slocum’s son is a weakling because Slocum never made him go to gym class. This son gets hit by a car. In sadness and despair, Slocum hugs him to death. I mean that very literally, not the new kind of “literally.” Slocum hugs his son until he dies from squeezing. 

    Even with the surprises spoiled, reading these books is still a worthwhile endeavor. You’re going to read all of them, right? What’s the best book twist you’ve ever read?

    The post DO NOT READ THIS POST: The 10 Biggest Book Spoilers, Ever appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Monique Alice 5:30 pm on 2015/10/16 Permalink
    Tags: allen ginsberg, anna karenina, in the wings, , , peter orlovsky, samuel clemens, ,   

    The Most Influential Literary Spouses 

    When true literary geniuses leave their mark on the writing world, they often make it seem effortless. We mere mortals are left to ponder, “How is it that one person wrote War and Peace when I can barely get out of the house wearing matching shoes?” But it all begins to make a little more sense when we consider how many iconic writers had a partner working diligently behind the scenes to keep everything together. The spouses below have helped to inspire, encourage, motivate, and critique their partners’ work all the way to the top—and for that, we owe them a debt of gratitude. Read on for some of the most influential better halves in the history of the written word.

    Olivia Clemens
    Anyone who has ever read Mark Twain (or Samuel Clemens, as his wife likely referred to him) can tell you his writing is as close to perfection as it gets. As it turns out, this is due in no small part to his wife Olivia’s contributions. Her upper-crust education and shrewd sensibilities conspired to make her an excellent editor, but that wasn’t her only input. Mrs. Mark Twain also helped temper her husband’s gregarious nature when appropriate, adding a depth and sensitivity to his work that only enhanced its narrative power.

    Leonard Woolf
    Virginia Woolf is one of the most celebrated authors in history, especially impressive considering the many barriers women faced in the world of writing in her day. Classics like A Room of One’s Own shine a light on some of these challenges, as well as Woolf’s battle with mental illness. Throughout all of her ups and downs, her husband, Leonard, was there to support her. As Leonard dabbled in writing himself, he and Virginia eventually opened a publishing company together that went on to print not only the couple’s work, but the work of other celebrated artists of the day. Woolf tragically took her own life, but gave Leonard credit for her happiness and success until the very end.

    Sofia Tolstoy
    When Sofia Behrs wed the 34-year-old Leo Tolstoy, she was just 18 years old. The couple would weather 48 years together, and they weren’t always the happiest. In Sofia’s later published diaries, she talks often of her husband’s lack of emotion toward her, as well as his willingness to leave the household and childrearing grunt work in her hands. In addition to her more mundane tasks, Sofia endlessly transcribed Tolstoy’s writing—and consistently said she was awestruck by her husband’s brilliance. Despite her grievances about his shortfalls as a husband and father, the wife of the man who wrote Anna Karenina remained truly dedicated to Tolstoy’s work until nearly a decade after his passing in 1910.

    Tabitha King
    With nine titles to her credit, Tabitha King is an accomplished author in her own right. Before she began her own writing career, though, she was a one-woman cheer squad for husband Stephen. When the Master of Horror’s career was in its infancy, its future was uncertain. Famously, while writing the manuscript for his first novel, Carrie, King became discouraged and chucked the pages into the trash. It was Tabitha who fished the beginnings of the now iconic novel out and helped polish it into the gem we know and love. It’s safe to say both now support each other in the writing of their respective novels.

    John Gregory Dunne
    Perhaps the seminal literary powerhouse couple, Joan Didion and John Dunne were inseparable for the entirety of their 40-year marriage. John Dunne’s work didn’t gain popularity until the 1980s, but before that time, he might have been referred to as the president of the Joan Didion fanclub. He was known for boring dinner guests and anyone else who would listen with an exhaustive singing of his wife’s praises. Although the Didions’ marriage was not without its faults, it withstood the test of time. One does have to wonder whether each would have reached the literary peaks they did without the undying support of the other.

    Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald
    Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald and F. Scott Fitzgerald led a famously wild lifestyle, complete with more than its fair share of excesses and debauchery—their frequent fights were infamous. One can guess that at least a few such fights were due to F. Scott’s relatively regular plagiarism of Zelda’s diary entries and other writings, which he casually assimilated into his own novels with nary a credit in sight. Zelda also functioned as a sounding board for her husband’s work, and he often gave her the final say in matters of style and form. Though he was brutally critical of her writing, Zelda continued to defend and espouse the virtue of her husband’s work until well after his passing.

    Vera Nabokov
    One can imagine the process of writing Lolita must have been fraught with self-doubt. If the book’s reception by many as a profane bit of scandalous pulp is any indication, it was a hard road. Vladimir Nabokov is said to have nearly given up on the manuscript many times, and likely would have if not for the intervention of devoted wife Vera. Vera functioned alternately as editor, agent, critic, and cheerleader for her husband. She even stood in for him occasionally in his role as a lecturer at Cornell when his schedule got too packed. The pair were married for 50 years, and hardly left each other’s sides during that time.

    Peter Orlovsky
    Though Peter Orlovsky and Allen Ginsberg were prevented from legally marrying, they were together for nearly 40 years and considered themselves partners for life. The beatnik pair were as influential on each other’s work as they were on the culture at large, frequently encouraging and inspiring one another to strive for greater achievements. Orlovsky’s lesser-known (but brilliant) poetic works were championed by Ginsberg, and Orlovsky is said to have been the muse for many of Ginsberg’s classic works.

    Who are your favorite literary power couples?

     
  • Kathryn Williams 3:30 pm on 2014/08/20 Permalink
    Tags: all the king's men, anna karenina, , dramarama, , jacqueline suzann, leo, , , robert penn warren, valley of the dolls,   

    Literary Astrology: Leo 

    Valley of the DollsBorn between July 23 and August 23, Leos are the kings (and queens) of the jungle. Natural performers who are fond of the limelight, you’ll find a fair share of them on Broadway and in Hollywood.  A Leo’s M.O. is to make an impression, and that they do. Generous, enthusiastic, creative, and loving, they can also be pompous and overbearing, but mild manners rarely make a leader. We suspect these literary characters were born under the sign of the Lion.

    Anna Karenina (Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy)
    Anna knows how to do one thing very well, and that is to take center stage. A lover of love, Anna (at first) practically bubbles over with enthusiasm and sincerity. She yearns for a more open-minded existence and draws others to her, most notably Vronsky. In her later, socially imposed isolation, however, she becomes overbearing, demanding, and irrational toward both her husband and her lover. Finally, in desperation, she resorts to the most theatrical stunt of all—in front of a moving train.

    Willie Stark (All the King’s Men, by Robert Penn Warren)
    Leonine Willie Stark is the ringleader of this political circus. A “man of the people,” he’s certainly got the charisma and love of the spotlight of a Leo. Motivations that are born of generosity and justice, however, are soon polluted, until Willie is just another imperious politician playing dirty. But, man, you’re gonna hear him roar.

    Neely O’Hara (Valley of the Dolls, by Jacqueline Susann)
    Oh, yes, we’re going there. In this 60s pop classic, attractive and ambitious Neely O’Hara, with a little help from her “doll” friends, rises to Hollywood stardom. Once there, however, she proves to be more difficult than Lindsay Lohan on arraignment day. Her once bright, promising star is not just eclipsed, but plummets to earth in a ball of fire fueled by arrogance, self-involvement, and alcoholic vapors.

    Sadye (Dramarama, by E. Lockhart)
    Tall, charistmatic, commanding Sadye (née Sarah) Paulson wants so badly to be as talented as her gay, black, and fabulous best friend, Demi, but she’s just…not, and that lays the groundwork for conflict in this YA drama camp story. No doubt Sadye is enthusiastic about theater and loves her BFF, but her ‘tude could use a little adjustment, which is, eventually, what is written in the stars.

    Who are some other Literary Leos we might have missed?

     
  • BN Editors 4:30 pm on 2014/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , a lesson before dying, , a thousand splended suns, animal dreams, anna karenina, , , , , , , harry potter and the deathly hallows, , , , , , , , , , one hundred years of solitude, , , , , sandman slim, , still life with woodpecker, , , the fellowship of the ring, , the glass menagerie, the mysteries of pittsburgh, , the things they carried, the watsons go to birmingham 1963, ,   

    43 Great Quotes From Literature We Forgot to Mention 

    TKAMLast week we collected 10 of our favorite lines in literature, but it appears we have forgotten some. Embarrassing! To those of you who weighed in on your own favorites in the comments: thank you. They were fun to read. And here they are!

    “My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.” —The Princess Bride (Sharon F.)

    “It is a truth universally that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.” —Pride and Prejudice (Shelley H.)

    “Have a biscuit, Potter.” —Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Megan B.)

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” —A Tale of Two Cities (Mary Ellen R.)

    “My dear, I don’t give a damn.” —Gone With the Wind (Michelle C.)

    “Most men and women will grow up to love their servitude and will never dream of revolution.” —Brave New World (Amber D.)

    “By the time we arrived, as evening was approaching, I felt as sore as a rock must feel when the waterfall has pounded on it all day long.” —Memoirs of a Geisha (Sunny H.)

    “Neighbours bring food with death and flowers with sickness and little things in between. Boo was our neighbour. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good luck pennies, and our lives.” —To Kill a Mockingbird (Shirisha T.)

    “The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.” —The Gunslinger (Rob B.)

    “Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit em, but remember that it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” —To Kill a Mockingbird (Kristy E.)

    “And so we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” —The Great Gatsby (Caitlyn S.)

    “I think of my life as a kind of music, not always good music but still having form and melody.”—East of Eden (Jessica H.)

    “Stay gold, Ponyboy, stay gold.” —The Outsiders (Laura M.)

    “And in that moment, like a swift intake of breath, the rain came.” —Other Voices, Other Rooms (Madalaine B.)

    “Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents!” —Little Women (Peggy C.)

    “When the day shall come that we do part,” he said softly, and turned to look at me, “if my last words are not ‘I love you’—you’ll ken it was because I didn’t have time.” —The Fiery Cross (Sharon T.)

    “Hey, boo.” —To Kill a Mockingbird (Theresa M.)

    “I believe there are monsters born in the world to human parents.” –East of Eden (JA R.)

    “I meant what I said and I said what I meant. An elephant’s faithful one-hundred percent!” —Horton Hatches the Egg (Carlie B.)

    “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” —The Fellowship of the Ring (Mel F.)

    “Tomorrow I’ll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day.” —Gone with the Wind (Carla M.)

    “If this typewriter can’t do it, then f@#$ it, it can’t be done. —Still Life with Woodpecker (Dan E.)

    “Sometimes you have to keep on steppin’.”—The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963 (Mary D.)

    “There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” —Pride and Prejudice (Pauline S.)

    “Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember except the story.” The Things They Carried (Kristy C.)

    “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” –Anna Karenina (JA R.)

    “Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt.” —Slaughterhouse-Five (Heather R.)

    “Marley was dead as a doornail.” —A Christmas Carol (Colleen D.)

    “Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aurelio Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon that his father took him to discover ice.” —One Hundred Years of Solitude (Janice S.)

    “What fresh hell is this?” —Jane Eyre (Katie D.)

    “Heart like shale. What you need is a good fracking.” —MaddAddam (Anna L.)

    “Always.” —Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Aimee U.)

    “Everything’s profound when there’s guns and zombies.” —Sandman Slim (Caroline R.)

    “To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is the bad dream.” —The Bell Jar (Veronica F.)

    “For one last time, Miriam does as she is told.” —A Thousand Splendid Suns (Barbara W.)

    “And that’s all we are Jefferson, all of us on this earth, a piece of drifting wood. Until we—each of us, individually—decide to become something else. I am still that piece of drifting wood, and those out there are no better. But you can be better.” —A Lesson Before Dying (Emily K.)

    “As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.” —The Fault in Our Stars (Jen P.)

    “‘Nobody run off with her,’ Roscoe said. ‘She just run off with herself, I guess.’” —Lonesome Dove (Cindy A.)

    “At the beginning of the summer I had lunch with my father, the gangster, who was in town for the weekend to transact some of his vague business.” —The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (Arthur M.)

    “What keeps you going isn’t some fine destination but just the road you’re on, and the fact that you know how to drive.” —Animal Dreams (Liz M.)

    “He was dancing, dancing. He says he’ll never die.” —Blood Meridian (Reed M.)

    “We’re all damaged, somehow.” —A Great and Terrible Beauty (Caitlin P.)

    “He’s more myself than I am.” —Wuthering Heights (Cortina W.)

    “Life is pain, highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.” —The Princess Bride, Betty D.

    “You know it don’t take much intelligence to get yourself into a nailed-up coffin, Laura. But who in hell ever got himself out of one without removing one nail?” —The Glass Menagerie (chelseyam)

    What great literary quotations did we STILL forget?

     
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