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  • Kat Sarfas 11:00 am on 2020/01/17 Permalink
    Tags: bnstorefront-booksofthemonth, Books of the Month, gordon korman, , jedidiah jenkins, karma brown, recipe for a perfect wife, , the unteachables, to shake the sleeping self   

    Barnes & Noble Books of the Month for January 

    So you’ve resolved to read more this year—fantastic! That also means you might be in the market for some brilliant and highly recommended titles to add to your must-read list for 2020, and we just happen to have the perfect place to start—our new Books of the Month program!

    Books of the Month was created to engage and inspire you—our avid readers. Each month we aim to spark new and exciting conversations around powerful narratives with thoughtfully selected stories picked by our amazing team of booksellers. We love a really good book recommendation and look forward to sharing ours with you.

    Our choices this month range from a heart-racing thriller set in the brutal isolation of the Australian outback to an unflinchingly honest memoir that travels from Oregon to Patagonia. We shine a light on an up and coming author’s clever look at two women ultimately finding their power in eerily similar patriarchies, some sixty years apart, and complete our list with a hilarious new middle grade novel that mashes together a class of lovable misfits and academic train wrecks and a teacher who just wants to retire.

    Thriller of the Month

    The Lost Man, by Jane Harper

    “Jane Harper has done it again! This standalone novel takes the reader on a thrilling rollercoaster ride through the Australian Outback as Nathan tries to solve the mystery of his brother’s death and learns that his family has more to hide than he could have ever imagined.” – Heidi Shinbaum, Bookseller, Brentwood, TN

    Two brothers meet for the first time in months at the remote fence line separating their cattle ranches deep in the Australian outback—where their third brother lies dead at their feet. With no sign of foul play and a victim with seemingly everything to live for, eldest brother Nathan starts his search to understand what led his brother Cameron to his fate. With a brutal climate and formidable landscape looming over the story, Nathan will wade through haunting urban legends and be forced to reckon with his family’s own secret history of violence.

    Just when you think you have all the pieces in place, this slow burn thriller will casually rebut all your theories, keeping you guessing until the very end. Thoroughly atmospheric and filled with compelling characters, this is a story that stays with you long after you finish reading.

    Non-Fiction Book of the Month

    To Shake the Sleeping Self: A Journey from Oregon to Patagonia, and a Quest for a Life with No Regretby Jedidiah Jenkins

    To Shake the Sleeping Self is a remarkable story of self-reflection and growth. Jedidiah Jenkins’s humor, wit and honesty easily made this one of my favorite books. You’ll laugh, cry, and grow, all within 330 pages.” – Stephen Harrington, Visual Merchandiser, New York, NY

    Terrified of being funneled into a life he didn’t choose, Jedidiah Jenkins decides to set off on an epic adventure all his own, spending sixteen months cycling from Oregon to Patagonia—and chronicling his meditations and experiences on Instagram along the way. While a yearning for the great unknown may be in his blood—his father is the author of the classic A Walk Across Americathis is more than just a travelogue. Emboldened by his travel companion and the people he meets along the way, Jedidiah focuses as much energy on his internal quest for self-discovery, grappling with questions of faith and his own identity.

    A powerful reminder that extraordinary things can happen when we truly embrace uncertainty and escape our comfort zones, this poetic and inspirational memoir takes a piercing look at the fears we carry and those moments of bravery that can set us free.

    Children’s Book of the Month

    The Unteachables, by Gordon Korman

    Any book that makes me both laugh out loud and tear up on the subway will always hold a special place in my heart! I found I unexpectedly learned a lot from the misfit group known as Unteachables, and their journey to connect with each other will resonate with every kid in a classroom today.” – Shannon Devito, Book Buyer, New York, NY

    Isolated from the rest of the student body in Room 117, the Unteachables are just thatan infamous group of middle school misfits with a colorful array of quirks that are considered simply irredeemable.  To add to the fun, their newly assigned teacher Mr. Kermit is by far the most burned-out teacher in all of Greenwich. Once a rising star, Mr. Kermit’s career was rocked by a cheating scandal some 26 years prior and now the only thing he cares about is counting down the days until early retirement.  When a gutsy vuvuzela heist rallies them all together, the Unteachables and Mr. Kermit might finally get their true shot at redemption after all.

    Hilarious, insightful, and deeply heartfelt, a rotating first person narrative keeps this story lively and completely entertaining. This is a true underdog story that shows a little kindness can ignite the hidden sparks in all of us.

    Discover Book of the Month

    Recipe for a Perfect Wife, by Karma Brown

    Recipe for a Perfect Wife has all of the ingredients for a page turning story that you will not want to put down. Rife with secrets, intricate storylines, and compelling characters—not to mention a recipe for the perfect meatloaf—Karma Brown’s latest is a tasty read this winter.” — Marisa Gothie, Bookseller, Wilmington, DE

    After reluctantly leaving New York City for the suburbs, newlywed Alice struggles with shifting roles at home and achieving domestic bliss in a new fixer-upper. When she discovers a vintage cookbook in her basement the allure of cooking up Baked Alaska and Chicken à la King soon reveals the darker story of the woman who previously owned it. As Alice discovers striking parallels between this woman’s life and her own, it finally forces her to focus on the trajectory of her own life, questioning the foundation of her marriage and what it means to be a wife fighting for her place in a patriarchal society.

    This mesmerizing dual narrative of a modern-day woman and a quintessential 1950s housewife is all at once witty and charming as well as dark and sinistermuch like its focus characters. With great care and gravity, this book creates a satisfying look at the lies we tell to feed the secrets we keep.

    The post Barnes & Noble Books of the Month for January appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Grace Charles 2:00 pm on 2020/01/08 Permalink
    Tags: reverie, ryan la sala, , ya book club   

    Our January YA Book Club Pick: Reverie by Ryan La Sala 

    Our YA book club brings readers together to discuss compelling stories and characters—and our January pick stands out for more reasons than one. Combining dreamscapes with real-life, Reverie by Ryan La Sala is both a suburban teen’s coming-of-age story and a fresh take on fantasy that leaves no voice unheard in a beautiful and blended world.

    Nothing is what it seems in Kane Montgomery’s life: his memories are a mess, he doesn’t know who to trust, and all the places he knows keep morphing into places he doesn’t. Reverie is more than a page-turning adventure story, it’s a novel that explores social constructs and stereotypes through unforgettable characters like Kane and mixed narrative genres. Featuring whimsical adventures grounded in authentic experiences, this story of personal discovery is a true testament to the process of understanding and accepting oneself. Tackling issues of queerness, identity, and relationships, Reverie offers a refreshing twist on queer voices—and through an unapologetic and honest narrative, Reverie delivers a powerful, relatable story that draws parallels to our society today.

    An empowering account of uncovering one’s identity, Reverie not only addresses what makes us different but celebrates it. Making space for queer voices in literature, La Sala has allowed for a unique protagonist to find out who he is, and more importantly, who he wants to be. With a constant pulse of wit and humor throughout, this fantasy novel speaks volumes to the power of trust, friendship, and individuality. Our Exclusive Edition of Reverie includes an annotated chapter with handwriting and drawings from the author in the margins, two pages of author notes, two pages of illustrations from the author, and a discussion guide.

    Our next YA Book Club night is January 10th at 7PM. Call your local B&N for details.

    The post Our January YA Book Club Pick: <i>Reverie</i> by Ryan La Sala appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 4:00 pm on 2020/01/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , dear edward   

    A Life Reconstructed in Dear Edward, B&N’s January Book Club Section 

    Is there anything better than connecting with a book you can’t wait to talk about with another reader? True, we all read for different reasons, for entertainment or escape, education or enlightenment. But every now and again, a book comes along—a book that’s so special, and smart, and bursting with love—that we can read for all of those reasons (and more) at the same time.

    Ann Napolitano’s new novel, Dear Edward is that book, special and smart and bursting with love, and it’s our January 2020 Barnes & Noble Book Club selection. There’s much to discuss in this story of hope and resilience, which makes it a terrific book club selection.

    Surviving trauma is a popular story trope but not often done with this level of grace. Napolitano turns a real-life tragedy into an inspiring story of recovery, showing us the lows and mind-numbing voids before the ups can be reached. Edward must make a new life that doesn’t include his parents or brother, a life that now includes an aunt and uncle he barely knows. They have to learn how to fit their individual griefs under one roof, and in Edward’s case, not that particular roof. Edward finds a surrogate sibling in Shay, the brash and bookish girl next door. Though Edward initially uses her presence to fill the void his brother has left behind, Shay becomes a steadying rock as his grief swirls around him.

    If you’d like to know more now, Ann Napolitano discusses her inspiration and why she felt compelled to tell this particular story on the B&N Podcast. Our Exclusive Edition of Dear Edward includes an essay that takes readers behind the scenes of this unforgettable novel, and a reading group guide.

    The B&N Book Club Night forDear Edward will be held around the country on February 4th, 2020 at 7pm; Check your local B&N for details.

    The post A Life Reconstructed in <i>Dear Edward</i>, B&N’s January Book Club Section appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 4:00 pm on 2020/01/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , dear edward   

    A Life Reconstructed in Dear Edward, B&N’s January Book Club Section 

    Is there anything better than connecting with a book you can’t wait to talk about with another reader? True, we all read for different reasons, for entertainment or escape, education or enlightenment. But every now and again, a book comes along—a book that’s so special, and smart, and bursting with love—that we can read for all of those reasons (and more) at the same time.

    Ann Napolitano’s new novel, Dear Edward is that book, special and smart and bursting with love, and it’s our January 2020 Barnes & Noble Book Club selection. There’s much to discuss in this story of hope and resilience, which makes it a terrific book club selection.

    Surviving trauma is a popular story trope but not often done with this level of grace. Napolitano turns a real-life tragedy into an inspiring story of recovery, showing us the lows and mind-numbing voids before the ups can be reached. Edward must make a new life that doesn’t include his parents or brother, a life that now includes an aunt and uncle he barely knows. They have to learn how to fit their individual griefs under one roof, and in Edward’s case, not that particular roof. Edward finds a surrogate sibling in Shay, the brash and bookish girl next door. Though Edward initially uses her presence to fill the void his brother has left behind, Shay becomes a steadying rock as his grief swirls around him.

    If you’d like to know more now, Ann Napolitano discusses her inspiration and why she felt compelled to tell this particular story on the B&N Podcast. Our Exclusive Edition of Dear Edward includes an essay that takes readers behind the scenes of this unforgettable novel, and a reading group guide.

    The B&N Book Club Night forDear Edward will be held around the country on February 4th, 2020 at 7pm; Check your local B&N for details.

    The post A Life Reconstructed in <i>Dear Edward</i>, B&N’s January Book Club Section appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 8:00 pm on 2019/12/06 Permalink
    Tags: , emma steinkellner, , guts, jen wang, , kwame alexander, meg jo beth amy: a modern retelling of little women, new kid, Raina telgemeier, stargazing, the crossover, the lost heir, the okay witch   

    Raise a Graphic Novel Reader: Our Booksellers’ Favorite 2019 Young Reader Graphic Novels 

    Graphic novels were once synonymous with superheroes, but these days, the biggest hits in the illustrative medium are aimed at young readers. Stories about kids, and written (and drawn!) for kids, are fast becoming some of the most popular titles in the bookstore. Graphic novels are great for reluctant readers, but will also please voracious ones. If you’re hoping to raise a graphic novel reader (or keep your existing one happy), we’d suggest starting with a book from the list below, representing Barnes & Noble booksellers’ 2019 favorites. (Explore all of our booksellers’ 2019 favorites.)

    Guts, by Raina Telgemeier
    Raina Telgemeier is at the forefront of the recent boom in graphic novels for kids thanks to hits like Smile and Sisters, not to mention her work on the graphic novel relaunch of The Baby-Sitters Club. Children love the frank, funny take on sibling squabbles and adolescent struggles, and her bright, clear drawings bring Raina’s everykid world to life. In Guts, Telgemeier tells the story of the devastating anxiety that struck her when she was in elementary school, causing terrible stomach aches that kept her home from school. As Raina faces her best friend moving away, the terrifying prospect of a class presentation, an overcrowded house, and a mean girl’s ire, kids will be riveted—and just might find a way to speak up about their own troubles.

    Stargazing, by Jen Wang
    This moving, funny, and beautiful graphic novel plunges the reader into the Chinese-American community alongside two girls, Christine Hong and Moon Lin. Christine is a disciplined striver, aiming to keep up with the top violin player in the orchestra. When Christine’s parents learn that a family from their church community is having money trouble, they rent out their extra apartment to Mrs. Lin and her daughter Moon, who has a reputation as a “weird kid” and a troublemaker. But Christine soon finds that Moon enjoys a freedom she longs for: Moon loves K-Pop, doesn’t speak Chinese, and paints her toenails blue. The girls become fast friends before a medical scare (inspired by the author’s own experience of having a brain tumor removed when she was six) threatens to derail their plans to perform at the school talent show. Sweet and atmospheric, Stargazing captures the genuine inspiration we derive from our friends.

    The Okay Witch, by Emma Steinkellner
    Steinkellner’s debut graphic novel captures both typical adolescent social anxiety and an extraordinary magical world. Moth is growing up in Founder’s Bluff, Massachusetts, where her single mom runs a thrift store. She is constantly harassed at school for being different, and has no friends—until a new boy moves to town. Meanwhile, in history class, the kids learn about a witch hunt in their town in the 1600s, and that the current mayor is a descendent of the town’s founder, who hated witches. The problem is, Moth is beginning to have unexplainable experiences that suggest she might be a witch herself. Steinkellner captures the atmosphere of an old New England town, and in the midst of a rollicking fantasy adventure, makes the vital point that history often only tells one side of the story.

    The Lost Heir, by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes
    A bestselling novel series returns in illustrated form, and retains all of the magic and adventure of the original. Years ago, when she was just a dragon egg, Tsunami and four other dragonets were captured and held hostage. Known as the dragonets of destiny, they were the chosen ones, selected to finally end a war between the various dragon tribes. But the dragonets had other plans. Having now escaped, they are headed to the SeaWing Kingdom, where Tsunami will be reunited with her mother, Queen Coral, and begin her new destiny as heir to the throne. But Tsunami soon discovers their new home may not be the safe haven she imagined.

    New Kid, by Jerry Craft
    Seventh grader Jordan Banks dreams of going to art school. But his parents have other plans and enroll him in the ultra-fancy Riverdale Academy Day School, a private school known for its focus on academics. Not only does Jordan feel like the social outcast, making the trip across town from his less-than-prestigious Washington Heights neighborhood, but he’s one of only a handful of kids of color in his entire grade. Now, he doesn’t fit in at home…and he doesn’t fit in at school. Where exactly does Jordan belong? And how can he remain loyal to his art?

    The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander and Dawud Anyabwile
    Kwame Alexander’s 2015 Newberry Medal–winning book gets the graphic novel treatment, with stunning art by Dawud Anyabwile enhancing the thrills of the sports-centric coming-of-age drama. Written in verse, The Crossover tells the story of twelve-year-old Josh Bell and his twin brother, who together rule the basketball court—thanks in no small part to their father, a former Euroleague champion. But when a crisis strikes the Bell family, basketball takes a backseat in this lively and emotional page-turner. Anyabwile’s dynamic and powerful illustrations shed new light on Alexander’s incredible characters as they navigate life on and off the court.

    Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: A Modern Retelling of Little Women, by Ray Terciero and Bre Indigo
    Louisa May Alcott’s classic story is given the graphic treatment, as creators Ray Terciero and Bre Indigo reimagine the March family for today’s kids. The sisters are now part of a blended family living in Brooklyn—Meg is black, Jo is white, and Beth and Amy are biracial. While their father fights overseas in the war on terror and their mother is preoccupied with the worries of being a single parent, the girls face their own struggles, their stories retaining the flavor of their original characterizations while feeling wholly modern: Amy faces racist bullying at school, Meg contemplates her future path in life, Jo hides her queer identity, and budding musician Beth faces a health crisis. Indigo’s clear and engaging art places the characters front and center, and their coming-of-age journeys truly resonate, retaining all the charm, humor, and drama of the beloved original.

    Click, by Kayla Miller
    The perils of navigating the elementary school social scene are at the forefront of this winning graphic novel starring Olivia, a social butterfly who has never had a problem making friends but still struggles to find her flock. With the big school talent show coming up, the rest of the class forms acts, leaving Olivia without a partner and with the realization that she doesn’t really have a best friend. She sinks into a funk—until she realizes (with a little help from her funky Aunt Molly) that she doesn’t need to join a clique to be the star of the show. Miller’s bright, accessible art makes this story of self-discovery a winner for experienced graphic novel readers and newcomers alike.

    These are the young reader books our booksellers recommend for budding graphic novel fans. What are your favorites?

    The post Raise a Graphic Novel Reader: Our Booksellers’ Favorite 2019 Young Reader Graphic Novels appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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