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  • Jeff Somers 3:00 pm on 2018/07/20 Permalink
    Tags: , betrayal marklund, danielle marchant, david mcraney, , i am so smat s-m-a-t, josh kaufman, lewis dartnell, mark manson, nickel and dimed, pause, prisoners of geography, quiet the rage, r.w. burke, , the first 20 hours: how to learn anything...fast!, the happiness project, , the nordic guide to living 10 years longer, , tim marshal, you are not so smart   

    10 The Best Books to Read This Summer to Become a Better, Smarter, Happier Person 

    Summer usually means a bit more free time, which can be used towards much-needed vacations and other relaxing, rejuvenating activities. We’re all stressed out, and that means it’s easy to fall into the habit of using every spare moment to unplug and turn off your brain.

    Nothing wrong with that, but that can lead to missed opportunities—opportunities to improve yourself. Sitting on a beach, on a plane—anywhere you have the time to read for a while this summer is a chance to apply a patch to your personal operating system and do an upgrade—to make yourself better, smarter, and happier. Mix in just a few of these ten books to your summer reading list and make that time off count.

    Be Better

    The Happiness Project, by Gretchen Rubin
    Sometimes the challenge with books that purport to make you better is simply choosing one—after all, you probably have a limited window in which to read and try some new tricks. Rubin’s book is an ideal starting place because it’s not a specific set of instructions or fad—it’s her story of trying all the instructions and fads. Rubin applies the advice from a variety of self-help books, ranging from the ancient to the modern, and reports on her results. Along the way you’ll get plenty of simple, practical advice—but it’s also a great way to pre-test a few things by sharing in Rubin’s experience. Kick off your Summer of Self-Improvement with an overview of the available approaches.

    Nickel and Dimed, by Barbara Ehrenreich
    Being a better person begins with empathy, something that often seems to be in short supply. Ehrenreich’s experiment, in which she took on the sorts of low-wage, long-hour jobs that far too often fail to support even modest lifestyles, remains an eye-opening read. We all work hard for what we have, but sometimes the rules aren’t fair—and Ehrenreich plumbs the depths of economic desperation where no matter how hard someone works they keep sliding backwards, the deck stacked against them. Take a moment this summer and contemplate how different your own life could be if you lacked even a few of the advantages you have.

    Quiet the Rage, by R.W. Burke
    We live in contentious times, and half the reason you plan a trip is to get away from your co-workers, relatives, and neighbors with their troubling opinions and confrontational attitudes. These days everyone thinks they have to argue endlessly—but there’s a different approach worth trying. Instead of reacting emotionally to provocations and different opinions—instead of seeking to ‛win’ and thus make other ‛lose,’ perpetuating a cycle of misery, we should seek to control our emotions and try to attain a level of conflict resolution that doesn’t involve turning your life into an endless argument—and coincidentally seeking to punish those who disagree with us. The result might just be a calmer and more effective person.

    Be Smarter

    The Knowledge, by Lewis Dartnell
    This might seem like a strange choice for vacay reading, but this guide to everything you just might need to know if the world ends is more practical than it seems. On the one hand, if the apocalypse is coming it’s not going to care about your vacation schedule. On the other, this book explains not just the systems that support our civilization—technologies we often blindly rely upon—it also explains the fundamentals under those technologies and systems. Reading this book might make you a little better prepared for the end of the world, and in the meantime, it will make you a lot smart about how the world actually works.

    Prisoners of Geography, by Tim Marshall
    Sometimes it’s difficult to understand why there is so much suffering in one area of the world and so much prosperity—and vacationing—in others. It’s easy to assume some not particularly enlightened things about groups of people, but this book lays out how the terrain, climate, and natural borders of a country dictates to a great extent the lives of its people and the fate of its society. This sort of visual thinking might just change your perspective on a lot of different aspects of modern life, especially the crises that never seem to get solved and the political decisions that seem nonsensical at first glance. Using updated maps, Marshall lays it all out for you—making you smarter in the process.

    The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything … Fast!, by Josh Kaufman
    Getting smarter isn’t just the accumulation of facts or even the widening of perspective—it’s also the acquisition of skills. Kaufman presents a system by which you can learn the fundamentals of just about anything with just 20 hours of focused effort—not the 10,000 hours that are often thrown about. While he doesn’t claim this will make you an expert, he does argue that the beginning of learning anything new is always the hardest phase, and the easiest to give up on. Getting though the arduous beginning phase of learning a new skill gives you the foundation to keep going—or to move on to the next thing that you just want a functional knowledge of. As you sit on the beach sipping your drink, ask yourself what you might like to learn if you knew how to get the basics in under a day.

    You Are Not So Smart, by David McRaney
    McRaney’s collection of genius blog posts makes one dismaying argument: you’re not as smart, special, or independent as you think you are—and he has receipts. His analysis of psychological experiments explode the lies we tell ourselves about ourselves, and reading this book can be a painfully eye-opening experience as he correctly guesses what you think about yourself and then grimly lays out the probable truth. Knowing your own limitations and seeing how you’ve been bamboozled in the past is a first step towards a smarter, more aware life, and this summer is your chance to take that step.

    Be Happier

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, by Mark Manson
    Let’s start here: most self-help books stroke your ego more than they actually improve things. By telling you that you’re special and have the special je ne sais quoi to change your life and be amazing, they’re just flattering you. Manson argues—forcibly and with a lot of sharp wit—that it’s better to be plainly honest about your own limitations and seek to adjust how you approach life instead of assuming that life should be adjusted to suit your needs. Bracing and sometimes alarming, this book is a dash of cold water to the face that so, so many of us need—and you will be happier for having read it, because the best way to start changing your life for the better is to start seeing it with clear eyes.

    The Nordic Guide to Living 10 Years Longer, by Bertil Marklund
    Marklund, a doctor and professor in Sweden, offers up a refreshingly simple guide to living longer. It’s funny, but if you offered people a pill that would give them an extra decade of life they’d take it, but offer some simple suggestions and suddenly they lose interest. Don’t be that person. Marklund draws on his years of experience along with scientific data to present ten pretty simple, reasonable suggestions, from getting more sleep to getting more exercise, all based on the Swedish lifestyle. This may sound overly simplistic, but the fact is most of us get caught up in remarkably complex exercise and diet regimens rather than simply doing the basics in just the right amount. Read this book while you nap in the sun and return to your life determined to get those extra ten years.

    Pause, by Danielle Marchant
    You’re on vacation and yet you’ve prepared a reading list and consulted this post to fine-tune it. You may not be doing vacations correctly, and Marchant wants you to pause and think about that. Americans work too hard and take too little vacation, and many of us are at risk of burning out without realizing, constantly and exhaustingly driving hard every moment. Marchand, who suffered a bit of a breakdown after years of sustained stress in a high-powered job, argues that everything in your life would be improved by learning how to take a step back at crucial moments when our guts are screaming to move and instead pause and think. A thoughtful moment not only calms nerves and lowers stress, it allows us to choose our moves carefully instead of constantly reacting in a jittery dance of anxiety and sleep-deprivation. This is an ideally thoughtful book to read while you’re (hopefully) far away from your Slack and Facebook feeds (you didn’t pack your work phone…right?).

    What books have helped you become better and smarter?

    The post 10 The Best Books to Read This Summer to Become a Better, Smarter, Happier Person appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Miwa Messer 4:00 pm on 2018/07/19 Permalink
    Tags: , , , ,   

    The Ensemble Author Aja Gable on the Attempt to Say That Unsayable Thing 

    Four friends are bound by their art and their ambition in Aja Gabel’s snappy debut, The Ensemble. We were delighted by the author’s insights about friendship, passion, and loyalty; her characters’ messy truths; and her lively, light writing. There is, as one of our bookseller reviewers said, “WOW on every page.” We asked Aja how her debut novel began for her, and this is what she said:

    Long before I wrote a word of my novel, The Ensemble, which is about a professional string quartet, I wrote one short story about music. A Russian violinist, Stefan, must fill in for his deceased teacher, Sergei, at a concert in Hong Kong. In a dressing room above the concert hall, he frets about his new million-dollar violin and the violent political riots happening outside his window. The drama is high and slick, and the language has a tinge of the old-fashioned. The story’s confidence wavers (an imprint of its nascency), but passages about the music performance flicker in early resemblance to the passages about music in my novel.

    I dug the old story up recently because I’ve been trying to figure out the origin of my novel, when the idea first began to take root. Was it here? I wondered.

    I know a neat and tidy origin story would point to a moment of revelation, an article that changed me, or a piece of music that unfolded a novel plot. But it feels instead like I’ve carried The Ensemble around with me for years, that it grew inside me as I grew, twining and fusing with my body from the moment I was five, when I first began to play the cello and write stories. Over the years, as I filled notebooks with fantasies and cut my calluses on steel core strings, the enmeshment continued. By the time I entered writing school, still playing the cello on the side, it was complete.

    Because of that fusing, I didn’t write about music because writing about music felt like writing about my skin or my voice. What was there to say? It was just me.

    I wrote that short story about the Russian violinist because of a conversation I had with a teacher about writing a novel. Make it easy on yourself, she said. What do you know enough about to write 300 pages? This version of the “write what you know” advice hadn’t occurred to me before. Rereading the story now, I see why. My relationship to music was the most intimate relationship I had, shared with no one but other musicians who I played with. But I believed novels to be big, outsized, highly dramatic. I also believed people wanted that sense of symphonic gravitas in any story about classical music. So I wrote a story that had all of that: political strife, foreign locales, tortured Russian artists. It’s not a bad story, but in rereading, I struggled to find the beating heart of it. It didn’t feel like my novel.

    It wasn’t until a year later, alone on a writing retreat, that I decided to do what I’d been hesitant to do before. I unraveled the story of music that was braided inside me, and began to parse the strands, until I figured out what it was about. That intimate narrative I’d tended to and told to no one but myself was itself about intimacy. When you play music with someone, you come to know their artistic impulses, their breath and body, their secret ambitions and wayward desires. And as I put the threads back together on the page, it took on new life and grew again. There are no steely Russians and no mid-recital explosions in this one. Instead, there are subtler and equally earth-shattering moments: a cruel, tossed off phrase, heartbreak that morphs with time, the death of an absent mother, the loss of a best friend.

    In the end, it did become big. The tale of a collaborative life, lived through music, across decades, is inevitably expansive. But it didn’t become big because I’d intended to write an epic. I don’t think any great novel begins by being enamored of its bigness. What ultimately opened the door into this novel was, for me, what always draws me to any book: truth, recognition, heart, the attempt to say that unsayable thing.

    I am now able to see it: the daunting excavation of the internal story I’d tended to for years. I don’t think it’s the root of every novel, but it was for my first one. I look at that old short story, the one about Sergei and Stefan and the riots, and see a writer who wanted to do what she thought other people wanted to read. But I think now that we should always only be writing what we ourselves want to read. And even in that older story, what I gravitate toward are the scenes of music, Stefan’s uncertainty while playing, his love of the physical feeling of his violin, his fear of the outside pressures drowning out his concerto, his song.

    The Ensemble is on sale now.

    The post <i>The Ensemble</i> Author Aja Gable on the Attempt to Say That Unsayable Thing appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Cristina Merrill 2:00 pm on 2018/07/18 Permalink
    Tags: , bad for you, campaign for his heart, , , j. daniels, , , rancher's dream, , , sophie jordan, the duke buys a bride, the other miss bridgerton   

    Romance Roundup: Ship Captains, Ranchers, and State Senate Candidates 

    This week’s Romance Roundup includes a woman looking for a fresh start in a Pacific Northwest town, a Bad Boy who wants to have a happily ever after with a very sweet lady, and a state senate hopeful who needs help with his public image.

    Cottage by the Sea, by Debbie Macomber
    Annie Marlow has gone through a pretty dark time recently, so she decides to escape to the Pacific Northwest for some major R&R. (We’ll go whale watching with you, Annie!) She rents a cottage and starts to meet some interesting characters in her new community. One of these interesting characters is Keaton, a painter who would instantly make any woman feel better with his calm but also dashing swagger. (Keaton, can we just, like, sit next to you on a porch and rest our heads on your muscular shoulder?) Keaton and Annie get to know each other quite well, and Annie starts to think there just might be a life for her in her new town. (There is, Annie! There is!) Then a major opportunity comes up. Will Annie stick around or pull a disappearing act or, we hope, find some kind of middle ground? (Available in hardcover, paperback, audiobook, and NOOK on July 17.)

    Bad for You, by J. Daniels
    Sean “Stitch” Molina has done some terrible things in his life and paid the price, and now he’s determined to stay on the straight and narrow. (Just cut the baddies out of your life, buddy! It’s not a cure but it’s a darn good start!) His new life plan involves avoiding Shayla Perkins, because she’s a Good Girl and he’s a Bad Boy and he doesn’t want to be a Bad Influence. (Oh, but Sean, you and Shayla can balance each other out in the nicest of ways!) But they can’t stay apart for too long, mainly because Shayla plus Sean equals Sexy. (Like, a LOT of Sexy. Sexy times three. Infinity Sexy. Sexy.) Here’s hoping they manage to work through their issues and embark upon an adventurous life together! This is the third book in Daniels’ Dirty Deeds series. (Available in paperback and NOOK on July 17.)

    The Other Miss Bridgerton, by Julia Quinn
    Poppy Bridgerton was just wandering around the Dorset coast, completing minding her own business, when she came upon a super cool cave and THEN her curiosity got the best of her. She ends up getting kidnapped by two dudes, tied up, and then plunked straight onto the bed of Captain Andrew James Rokesby. (Yes, please, and thank you!) He’s a good guy, though, and he’s just trying to complete a mission to Portugal to deliver some documents. This means that our heroine is safe from being ravished by him, which is kind of sad because hello, Mr. Biceps! Anyway, Andrew knows he’ll have to marry her in order to help her avoid a mega-scandal. (See: good guy.) She doesn’t know, though, that they are already closer than she thinks, because he’s neighbors with her relatives. A kidnapping story with two nice people headed to warm, sunny Portugal? Yes, please! This is the third book in Quinn’s Rokesby series. (Available in hardcover, paperback, and NOOK on November 18.)

    Rancher’s Dream, by B.J. Daniels
    Our gal Drey Hunter, for some reason we’ll definitely want to know about, decided to leave Hawk Cahill and marry Someone Else. (Drey, how was leaving Hawk physically and emotionally possible?!) Then Drey’s husband disappears on their wedding night, and Drey finds herself alone in a creepy, high-tech mansion in the middle of nowhere. Oh, and she realizes that someone is trying to kill her. She enlists Hawk’s help, and he’s determined to do whatever it takes to keep Drey safe. (For the record: Hawk is more of a cozy log cabin kind of man who would build a woman a fire using his bare, masculine hands and then take her in front of said fire multiple times on a bearskin rug made of a bear he shot and then sewed up himself.) Hawk, protect Drey and give her a second chance! Drey, we’ll all drive you to your annulment appointment! This book is part of Daniels’ Montana Cahills series. (Available in paperback on August 1.)

    The Duke Buys a Bride, by Sophie Jordan
    Marcus, the Duke of Autenberry, couldn’t just sit there and do nothing when he saw the lovely Alyse Bell being auctioned off. He decides to purchase her, but he didn’t realize that by doing this he kind of bought himself, like, a wife. (It’s okay, Marcus! You were likely hungover at the time. We applaud your good intentions.) Alyse doesn’t want to be married to Marcus, even if he is sex dipped in cheese and spread on a cracker. They run off together to his Scottish estate, thinking this will give them plenty of time to figure out how to break it all off. Then they realize that hey, they actually like each other and lifetime together would not be the worst thing that ever happened to either of them. Will Marcus show Alyse that naughty dukes can be very, very good? And will Alyse prove to Marcus that she would be a great wife AND a great duchess? This is the third book in Jordan’s Rogue Files series. (Available in paperback on July 24.)

    Campaign for His Heart, by Joy Avery
    Lauder Tolson is a former foster kid who is now running for North Carolina state senate, but being a sexy, single man doesn’t exactly make for the best public relations material. (Lauder, this is a shame, because we wouldn’t mind getting your flyers in our mailboxes!) He decides to soften his image by recruiting his childhood enemy Willow Dawson to play his sweetheart. Oh, and he might have broken her heart once upon a time. (Seriously, Lauder! What did our gal do to deserve your bad manners? Steal your pudding?) Willow isn’t feeling the warm fuzzies for Lauder these days, but she has her own plans to hatch, and he just might be the perfect man to help her. Willow, you focus on being your fabulous self! And Lauder, you must grovel if you want to win this gorgeous woman back. A lot. This is the second book in Avery’s Cardinal House series. (Available in paperback and NOOK on August 1.)

    What exciting new romance novels are you packing in your beach bag this week?

    The post Romance Roundup: Ship Captains, Ranchers, and State Senate Candidates appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jeff Somers 6:00 pm on 2018/07/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , looking sharp, ,   

    The 10 Best Book Covers of All Time 

    We’d open this post with the obligatory joke about judging books by their covers—but we all do judge books by their covers. For better or worse, it’s our first impression of the author’s work—and a great cover will make us pick up a book as fast as a poor one will make us put it aside.

    That pressure to stand out inspires a lot of creativity among publishers, and every year, some truly amazing covers are designed. Yet only a few truly penetrate into pop culture to become iconic—perpetually recognizable, often imitated. Here are 10 of the best book covers of all time.

    Beowulf, translated by Seamus Heaney

    Whether you’re interested in a thousand-year old poem written in Old English or Seamus Heaney’s crisp, brilliant translation of what may be the oldest poem in something considered English, chances are you at least stopped to pick up this book when you saw the cover. The intensity of the image conveys horror, violence, and strangeness effortlessly, with the end result being that somewhat more people are familiar with this strange epic poem than before this cover hit the shelves.

    The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    May this cover never to retired. Created by Spanish artist Francis Cugat for the book’s initial printing, it pretty much is the book now, visually-speaking. Its success stems from its haunting, haunted nature, its surrealism, and the way it captures the mood of the book: the sad, weary eyes floating insubstantially over what could be an overheated, decadent party.

    The Godfather, by Mario Puzo
    Simple and stark, this cover, created by S. Neil Fujita, conveys the rotten power Puzo examines, even as it intrigues the potential reader. It could just as easily be the cover to a horror novel—which isn’t actually that far off the mark, if you think about it. There aren’t too many book covers that create what’s essentially a brand logo, but that’s just what this one did.

    A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
    Not so much the cover of the edition featured here, which is quite nice, but this one, designed by David Pelham in 1972 to coincide with the film release. Supposedly banged out in a single evening, its use of bright, primary colors was startling at the time, hinting at the hallucinogenic nightmare within, and the use of a cog for an eye punned on the title, referenced the iconic film, and conveyed the sense of society being broken all at once. It’s brilliant on a level no other cover has quite been able to surpass.

    The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas
    Brilliant covers don’t have to be old; the cover to Thomas’ recent breakout novel, designed by artist Debra Cartwright, uses negative space in a bold, powerful way. Lead character Starr is depicted faithfully based on her description from the book—simultaneously fierce and terrified —and yet she is obscured by her message, which is somehow perfect. Like the subject matter of the story, this cover demands you look.

    Look Who’s Back, by Timur Vermes
    Speaking of negative space, is there a more brilliant use of it in publishing history? We submit that there is not.

    A Million Little Pieces, by James Frey
    We’re not here to rehabilitate Frey or his memoir-that-was-really-fiction. We’re here to praise the cover, and designer Rodrigo Corral. Whatever your opinion of the dark tale of addiction and the poor decisions behind it, the cover conveys chaos, confusion, helplessness—all the things that Frey either did or didn’t deal with in the course of his life. Its use of color is brilliant, and the wrongness of a hand covered in rainbow sprinkles clues you in to the nature of the story.

    The Stranger, by Albert Camus
    If your head spins a little when looking at Helen Yentus’ cover for Camus’ most famous book, you’re in the right headspace to start reading this disturbing, challenging story. The stark lines converging on the diffuse, cloud-like title creates a head-ache inducing optical illusion. Once you see it, you’ll never forget it; once you read the book, you’ll forever associate it nwith this powerful cover.

    The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
    Nothing against Elizabeth Moss, but the classic cover from the 1985 American paperback, which is still used for many versions of Margaret Atwood’s dark future vision, is the definition of iconic. The overwhelming wall, the apparently hopeless and random motion of the handmaids, and their iconic red costumes—these elements combine into one of the most evocative book covers ever.

    Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
    Brave New World has had a lot of covers in its time. A lot. But this one, designed by Gregg Kulick for the modern classics series, is stunning. Similar in some ways to the Camus cover above, it combines the absurd and frightening tone of the story with a simple, bold approach that draws the eye and holds it tortuously. You try to figure out what you’re looking at, even as the sneaking suspicion that you don’t want to know creeps up on you.

    What’s your pick for the best cover ever?

    The post The 10 Best Book Covers of All Time appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 2:00 pm on 2018/07/16 Permalink
    Tags: , bear town, beneath a scarlet sky, cecelia ahern, , , educated, , franklin graham, , , helen hoang, , mark sullivan, , , , , the gift, , , , therese ann fowler, through my father's eyes,   

    Cottage by the Sea Author Debbie Macomber Shares Her Summer Reading List 

    Filled with memorable characters and set in gorgeous locales, bestselling author Debbie Macomber’s novels about family, friendships, and love, will help even a staycation feel like an escape. And while her stories are perfect for reading any time of the year (her Angel series and Christmas novels are delightful to cozy up with during the holidays), summer is the perfect time to lose yourself one of her lush, heartwarming stories. In her newest novel, Cottage by the Sea, a woman who has experienced great trauma travels to the Pacific Northwest, a place where she has happy memories from childhood, to recover. There she begins building a new life for herself, despite her grief, discovering her own community and even finding romance—until she finds herself at the crossroads of an important and life-defining decision. Ms. Macomber was kind enough to share her own summer reading list with B&N Reads—and it is filled with fascinating stories, from nonfiction to historicals, that are sure to find their way onto your own summer to-be-read pile! Enjoy her ten picks below (and don’t miss her interview with the B&N Podcast here!).

    Beneath a Scarlet Sky, by Mark Sullivan
    I’m actually half way through this book about an Italian youth working for the resistance in World War II, which I’m finding to be fascinating. It’s based on a true story and compelling reading.

    Through My Father’s Eyes, by Franklin Graham
    With the death of Billy Graham earlier this year I have this book on my bookshelf and am eager to read about the man himself.  I personally attended two of his crusades and am a great admirer of this godly man.

    The Gift, by Cecilia Ahern
    This is actually a Christmas book that I’ve been wanting to read since the holidays.  If I wait much longer it will be the season so I’ve moved it to my “to-be-read” pile.

    The Kiss Quotient, by Helen Hoang
    There’s been quite a bit of industry buzz about this book.  I found the premise intriguing, an autistic woman who is eager to understand what it is to fall in love.

    The High Tide Club, by Mary Kay Andrews
    Her beach reads are something I look forward to each summer season. This story is full of romance, and even has a surprising twist that I did not expect!

    All We Ever Wanted, by Emily Giffin
    It’s a thought provoking and relatable novel that involves complex social issues we face in today’s society. This is definitely one of her best, and who doesn’t love the cobalt blue cover!

    The Great Alone, by Kristin Hannah
    Many people know Kristin from her book The Nightingale, but this stand alone is just as amazing! The Great Alone is set in Alaska which is wild in nature. This setting mixed with the dysfunction of the family creates a downfall of events. Each dark moment seems to get darker and darker. This story digs deep, and the character development is incredible. Your heart will be intertwined and invested not only with Leni and her parents, but the community who embraces this family.

    Bear Town, by Fredrik Backman
    The tragedies that befall this community and the families there are much like you’d experience in any small town. When you finish this book, you know there is more to this story. I was thrilled to see the follow up Us Against You was just released.

    Educated, by Tara Westover
    This is a truly gripping story about a girl struggling for an education. It pulled at my heart strings as I read through each page. This book is moving and demonstrates the power in someone’s life that an education holds.

    Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald, by Therese Ann Fowler
    With her highly anticipated new book coming out this October, A Well-Behaved Woman: A Novel of the Vanderbilts, I decided to reread this one.  It was just as good if not better the second time. It takes you back in time to the roaring twenties and the Jazz era. Re-reading this book made me anxious for her next debut.

    Cottage by the Sea is on B&N bookshelves July 17.

    The post <i>Cottage by the Sea</i> Author Debbie Macomber Shares Her Summer Reading List appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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