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  • Madina Papadopoulos 4:00 pm on 2018/04/06 Permalink
    Tags: amy riolo, , diabetes snacks treats and easy eats for kids, fix-it and forget-it slow cooker diabetic cookbook, italian diabetes cookbok, lily nichols, phyllis good, real food for gestational diabetes, tasty and nutritious, the with or without meat cookbook   

    Cooking with Diabetes: 5 Inspired Cookbooks 

    Cooking can be intimidating. Getting the portions and the ingredients right is both a skill and an art. Cooking with diabetes—well that means being even more attentive when it comes to portions and ingredients. For those who have diabetes, cooking for family with diabetes, or simply want to watch their glycemic index, these five cookbooks have breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even snacks, in the bag.

    Fix-It and Forget-It Slow Cooker Diabetic Cookbook: 550 Slow Cooker Favorites-to Include Everyone!, by Phyllis Good
    The slow-cooker is the favorite appliance of those living a fast-paced life. Like the slow and steady turtle from the story of the tortoise and the hare, it takes its time percolating, and is ready with a meal at the finish line once the hare is done rushing through its busy day. Author Phyllis Good collaborated with the American Diabetes Association to present the recipes, crisply and clearly explaining how to plan meals, giving detailed daily meal plans, and including thorough nutritional information with each dish. With 550 recipes to choose from, this diabetic recipe guide has a meal for every busy day of the week. Many recipes focus on meat-centric stews and soups, Herbed Lamb Stew or Easy Hamburger Vegetable Stew, but the collection also features plant-based recipes, like Smothered Lentils.

    Italian Diabetes Cookbook: Delicious and Healthful Dishes from Venice to Sicily and Beyond, by Amy Riolo
    When one thinks of Italian food, carb-loaded delights come to mind: risottos, calzones, paninis, and of course, an array of pastas. But fortunately, Mediterranean food expert Amy Riolo has got diabetics covered. Having grown up in an Italian family with a diabetic mother, Riolo puts a personal passion into this book. It’s said that the most important ingredient to cook with is love, and each recipe here has a healthy serving of that. Riolo shares nutritious and delicious recipes that are quintessentially Italian: Chargrilled Asparagus with Balsamic & Parmesan, Swordfish with Olives, Capers, Herbs, & Tomatoes, and Umbrian Frittata Skewers with Chickpea Dipping Sauce.

    Real Food for Gestational Diabetes: An Effective Alternative to the Conventional Nutrition Approach, by Lily Nichols
    Pregnancy can be a roller coaster ride, with ups and downs, thrills and worries. One of the tests pregnant women have to go through in their third trimester is the dreaded the glucose tolerance test. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes can feel as though their culinary lives have been turned upside down. And let’s face it, it’s not fun to be ravenous and still have to watch everything you eat. But Registered Dietician and Nutritionist Lily Nichols, shares her personal journey through gestational diabetes in an uplifting and inspiring way. The book focuses less on what to cook and more on how to eat, making it more of an empathetic cooking guidebook than a cookbook.

    The With or Without Meat Cookbook: The Flexible Approach to Flavorful Diabetes Cooking, by Jackie Newgent
    One assumption many make when they think of cooking for diabetics is that meals are meat-centric. It’s likewise widely assumed that a vegetarian diet must be filled with carb-centric meals. While the diabetic and vegetarian rules may seem incongruous with one another, their intersection actually yields an original and delicious cuisine. Chef, nutritionist, and cookbook author Jackie Newgent has a couple of diabetes cookbooks under her belt. This one is great because they can be tailored for a household that includes both vegetarians and omnivores. Enjoy the Curry Chicken Salad Platter, Grecian Kebabs on Quinoa, and Roasted Cauliflower Florentine, each with a non-meat substation provided.

    Diabetes Snacks, Treats, and Easy Eats for Kids: 150 Recipes for the Foods Kids Really Like to Eat, by Barbara Grunes, with Linda R. Yoakam
    Getting food ready at the end of the school day is already a challenge. Convincing kids to eat healthy snacks doubles that challenge. Making yummy AND nutritious snacks for kids at risk of diabetes—the challenge is ten-fold. So bravo to those facing it daily. This cookbook, Diabetes Snacks, Treats, and Easy Eats for Kids, helps parents along the way, offering 150 ideas for snacks that children will actually want to eat. With sneaky cooking, kids will be clamoring for Peaches in a Blanket, Ants on a Log, and best of all, Wiggly, Slimy, Wormy, Gelatin.

    What are your favorite diabetic cookbooks?

    The post Cooking with Diabetes: 5 Inspired Cookbooks appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 5:00 pm on 2018/03/29 Permalink
    Tags: alison miksch, anna olson, carla snyder, citrus: sweet and savory sun-kissed recipes, , gwendolyn richards, i love lemon!, ilva beretta, jamie schler, lori longbotham, luscious lemon desserts, nicole franzen, orange appeal: savory and sweet, pucker: a cookbook for citrus lovers, sweet and tart: 70 irresistible recipes with citrus, valerie aidman-smith, victoria pearson   

    Show your Zest for Spring with 5 Citrus Cookbooks 

    One of the most vibrant and colorful foods to cook with is citrus. Be they green, orange, pink, yellow, or red, these fruits are beautiful inside and out, making any dish pretty as well as delicious.As the seasons change, the weather moves from stark winter to colorful spring. Celebrate this cheerful change in your kitchen with five cookbooks dedicated to cooking with citrus.

    Citrus: Sweet and Savory Sun-Kissed Recipes, by Valerie Aikman-Smith and Victoria Pearson
    Valerie Aikman-Smith’s resume includes impressive food feats like working at Alice Waters’s renowned restaurant, Chez Panisse, styling food for blockbusters like Titanic, contributing to Bon Appetit, and writing this delectable cookbook on all things citrus. Aikman-Smith’s elevated aesthetic comes alive with images by fellow author and photographer, Victoria Pearson—both the cover and the pages are a feast for the eyes. With six chapters partitioned by type of fruit—lemon, lime, orange, tangerine, grapefruit, and the rest—this book boasts citrus-based recipes that complete a full-course meal. Start with  Crudités with Pomelo Aioli, followed by Yuzu-Glazed Salmon as a main course, and complete the dinner with Orange Blossom Macarons.

    Pucker: A Cookbook for Citrus Lovers, by Gwendolyn Richards, foreword by Anna Olson
    Journalist Gwendolyn Richards used to report on police in Calgary, Alberta, but has since refocused her talents to cover a more relaxing aspect of life: food. As well as covering cuisine for the Calgary Herald, she has her own blog, Patent and the Pantry, and has written this lovely cookbook! Recipes include appetizing treats like Scallops with Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc, Citrus-Braised Pork Shoulder Tacos, and a smattering of citrus cocktails.

    Sweet and Tart: 70 Irresistible Recipes with Citrus, by Carla Snyder and Nicole Franzen 
    With both simple and unique recipes, Sweet and Tart: 70 Irresistible Recipes with Citrus is a great book for newbie cooks and kitchen pros alike. The author, Carla Snyder, begins with easy-to-follow cooking methods and a list of utensils needed to make anyone’s citrus dreams come to fruition. The book’s chapters are broken up into categories, starting with Bars and Cookies, leading into Cakes, continuing with Chilled & Frozen Desserts, and finishing with Savories. The dishes skew more sweet than tart, with like Greek Baklava with Cinnamon & Orange, Lemon-Almond Cake with Basil Honeyed Berries, but there are also some yummy savories, like Flat Bread with Lemony Pesto and Ricotta.

    Orange Appeal: Savory and Sweet, by Jamie Schler and Ilva Beretta 
    If oranges are your favorite citrus, or if you live in a region with an abundance of oranges, then Orange Appeal: Savory and Sweet is for you. This beautiful book was written by prolific food writer and hotelier, Jamie Schler, and the recipes stunningly captured by photographer, Ilva Beretta. While Schler has lived in France for decades, she was raised in the orange state, Florida, and shares her knowledge of the minutest details of the fruit: from the many varieties to surprising uses. The enticing pages impart a bounty of mouthwatering recipes, like Orange Fig Sauce, Savory Orange, Onion and Olive Focaccia, and Orange Rosemary Wedding Day Chicken.  If the book whets your appetite for more slices, try the recipes from the cook herself at Schler’s hotel, Hôtel Diderot, in Chinon, France.

    Luscious Lemon Desserts, by Lori Longbotham and Alison Miksch 
    Lemon tart, lemon custard, lemon meringue, lemon pound cake, lemon popsicle, lemon crêpes… this versatile, tart, citrus makes an abundance of scrumptious sweets. Cookbook author and magazine recipe developer Lori Longbotham has written numerous dessert and fruit cookbooks, and lucky for us she added a spoonful of sugar to zesty lemons for more than 70 recipes. Treats include, but are not limited to: Lemon Mascarpone, Lemon Crême Brulée, Chilled Lemon Soufflé, Lemon Chocolate Sorbet…it’s like lemon heaven.

    What are your favorite citrus-showcasing recipes?

    The post Show your Zest for Spring with 5 Citrus Cookbooks appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 4:00 pm on 2018/03/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , david wondrich, , jaime joyce, , , moonshine: a cultural history of america's infamous liquor, ross bolton, , ,   

    Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze 

    When swiveling a craft cocktail in one’s hand, it’s easy to appreciate the mixologist who just made it. What can make the appreciation for the drink all the more pleasant is understanding the history, agriculture, and society behind a particular drink or liquor. These five books dip back in time to the history of drinks, both how they are made and when they were mixed. Cheers! 

    Imbibe! Updated and Revised Edition: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to “Professor” Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar, by David Wondrich
    When one thinks cocktails and history, the name ‘David Wondrich’ quickly comes to mind. Both a mixologist and a historian, Wondrich is a leader in the field of cocktail history. No booze-shelf is complete without his James Beard Award winning book, Imbibe! Through a snifter glass, the book peers back in time, beginning with “The Archaic Age” of mixology in the United States of the late 1700s, then following developments of punches, juleps, cocktails, and other delights. Wondrich knows how to mix a drink as masterfully as he turns a phrase, which makes the book not only an informative but also a gratifying read.

    The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World’s Great Drinks, by Amy Stewart
    For those who drink and wonder about the where, when, how, and why a particular liquor was made, The Drunken Botanist has the answers. The bewitching green book looks almost like a spell book, with secrets and lore to share for the curious of mind. Horticulturalist, author, bookstore owner, and blogger for Garden Rant, Amy Stewart dives deep into the plants behind alcohol. (Note: while a lot of plants and herbs that go into booze, they don’t count toward your daily servings of veggies.) The book is part history, part biology, and part chemistry, but even if you don’t know much about those subjects, Stewart presents the information in an easy-to-digest manner.

    Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails: From the Alamagoozlum to the Zombie 100 Rediscovered Recipes and the Stories Behind Them, by Ted Haigh
    Looking to travel to the past through a cocktail glass? (Who isn’t?!) This lovely book by cocktail expert and historian Ted Haigh (AKA Dr. Cocktail), dips into drink history by resurfacing long lost beverages. Learn how to make a Knickerbocker à la Monsieur, The Mother-in-Law Cocktail, and many more delicious cocktails with (almost) equally delicious sounding names. Like the title of this book, the content is tons of fun, with engaging fonts, whimsical illustrations, and a charismatic voice that speaks directly to the reader like a friend enjoying a beer—er, cocktail.

    Moonshine: A Cultural History of America’s Infamous Liquor, by Jaime Joyce
    Moonshine is perhaps one of the more elusive liquors with possibly the best name, and a slew of great nicknames as well (white lightning, choop, mountain dew, etc.). The lore of Moonshine is braided into American history, and this book takes the reader through colonial times, the American Revolution, prohibition, and onto moonshine in the modern era. Writer Jaime Joyce tells an intoxicating tale that mixes anecdotes, folklore, history, and even a few cocktails, like the Moonshine-based take on the Margarita, aptly called the ‘Moon-a-Rita.

    Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide 1862 Reprint: How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas with an introduction by Ross Bolton 
    This book isn’t an alcohol history book, but an historical cocktail recipe book. This collection of recipes was originally published in 1862, and is purported to be the first of its kind. It is written by bartender/professor, Jerry Thomas, whom David Wondrich pays homage to in the title of his book, Imbibe! With vintage recipes like Nectar for the Czar and D’Orsay Punch, this book is a nice addition for the booze book collector.

     

    The post Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 4:00 pm on 2018/03/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , david wondrich, drink and be merry, , jaime joyce, , , moonshine: a cultural history of america's infamous liquor, , ,   

    Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze 

    When swiveling a craft cocktail in one’s hand, it’s easy to appreciate the mixologist who just made it. What can make the appreciation for the drink all the more pleasant is understanding the history, agriculture, and society behind a particular drink or liquor. These five books dip back in time to the history of drinks, both how they are made and when they were mixed. Cheers! 

    Imbibe! Updated and Revised Edition: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to “Professor” Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar, by David Wondrich
    When one thinks cocktails and history, the name ‘David Wondrich’ quickly comes to mind. Both a mixologist and a historian, Wondrich is a leader in the field of cocktail history. No booze-shelf is complete without his James Beard Award winning book, Imbibe! Through a snifter glass, the book peers back in time, beginning with “The Archaic Age” of mixology in the United States of the late 1700s, then following developments of punches, juleps, cocktails, and other delights. Wondrich knows how to mix a drink as masterfully as he turns a phrase, which makes the book not only an informative but also a gratifying read.

    The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World’s Great Drinks, by Amy Stewart
    For those who drink and wonder about the where, when, how, and why a particular liquor was made, The Drunken Botanist has the answers. The bewitching green book looks almost like a spell book, with secrets and lore to share for the curious of mind. Horticulturalist, author, bookstore owner, and blogger for Garden Rant, Amy Stewart dives deep into the plants behind alcohol. (Note: while a lot of plants and herbs that go into booze, they don’t count toward your daily servings of veggies.) The book is part history, part biology, and part chemistry, but even if you don’t know much about those subjects, Stewart presents the information in an easy-to-digest manner.

    Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails: From the Alamagoozlum to the Zombie 100 Rediscovered Recipes and the Stories Behind Them, by Ted Haigh
    Looking to travel to the past through a cocktail glass? (Who isn’t?!) This lovely book by cocktail expert and historian Ted Haigh (AKA Dr. Cocktail), dips into drink history by resurfacing long lost beverages. Learn how to make a Knickerbocker à la Monsieur, The Mother-in-Law Cocktail, and many more delicious cocktails with (almost) equally delicious sounding names. Like the title of this book, the content is tons of fun, with engaging fonts, whimsical illustrations, and a charismatic voice that speaks directly to the reader like a friend enjoying a beer—er, cocktail.

    Moonshine: A Cultural History of America’s Infamous Liquor, by Jaime Joyce
    Moonshine is perhaps one of the more elusive liquors with possibly the best name, and a slew of great nicknames as well (white lightning, choop, mountain dew, etc.). The lore of Moonshine is braided into American history, and this book takes the reader through colonial times, the American Revolution, prohibition, and onto moonshine in the modern era. Writer Jaime Joyce tells an intoxicating tale that mixes anecdotes, folklore, history, and even a few cocktails, like the Moonshine-based take on the Margarita, aptly called the ‘Moon-a-Rita.

    Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide 1862 Reprint: How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas with an introduction by Ross Bolton 
    This book isn’t an alcohol history book, but an historical cocktail recipe book. This collection of recipes was originally published in 1862, and is purported to be the first of its kind. It is written by bartender/professor, Jerry Thomas, whom David Wondrich pays homage to in the title of his book, Imbibe! With vintage recipes like Nectar for the Czar and D’Orsay Punch, this book is a nice addition for the booze book collector.

     

    The post Drinking and Thinking: 5 Books About the History of Booze appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Madina Papadopoulos 8:00 pm on 2018/02/28 Permalink
    Tags: beth archer brombert, beyond turkey legs, , cooking and dining in medieval england, edward schneider, francoise sabban, greg jenkins, maggie black, massimo montanari, medieval cooking in today's kitchen, medieval kitchen: recipes from france and italy, medieval tastes: food cooking and the table, odile redon, peter brears, silvano serventi, the medieval cookbook: revised edition   

    Raise a Tankard to 5 Medieval-Inspired Cookbooks 

    The medieval feast generally conjures cinematic images of lords and ladies sitting at banquets, eating with their hands, sharing cups, and drinking mead. But to if you’d like to get a good deal more specific as to what is in those bread bowl trenchers, these five books delve deep into the what, why, where, and how of food preparation in the Middle Ages. Take a peek at these fascinating historical overviews, as the recipes look a good deal more appetizing (and complex) than Hollywood films have depicted.

    Cooking and Dining in Medieval England, by Peter Brears
    Leading British food historian Peter Brears has a cornucopia of knowledge when it comes to culinary history. (He also boasts the accomplishment of being the UK’s foremost jelly expert, thank you very much.) Hop aboard Brears’ time machine, as he travels back to the world of Medieval England, detailing the equipment used for cooking, the management of the household, and of course, recipes that would have made Medieval ladies and gentlemen swoon (hedgehog, anyone?). The book transports the reader further through lovely original illustrations by Brears that draw one fully into the culinary world of Medieval England. It’s no surprise that this delightful book received the illustrious André Simon award.

    Medieval Cooking in Today’s Kitchen, by Greg Jenkins
    Bringing turn-of-the-first-millennium gastronomy into the turn-of-the-second-millennium kitchen can be a little intimidating…(How did they get by without a Cuisinart mixer?) As the Black Forest fairies would have it, home cooks can sift the intimidation out of cooking by jumping into this distant world with Greg Jenkins’ cookbook, Medieval Cooking in Today’s Kitchen. The seventy-eight recipes include everything one needs for a full course dinner party. Astound guests with bizarre dishes like Caws Wedi Pobi Welsh Rarebit, Chawetty Tarts, and who can’t get enough of Pompys Medieval Meatballs?

    Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table, by Massimo Montanari and Beth Archer Brombert (Translator)
    For the history buff looking to find the nitty-gritty of 12th century food (but not interested in recipes), look no further than Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table. In this extensive tome, Italy’s preeminent food scholar and Medievalist, Massimo Montanari, brings his expertise together to present a captivating book on Medieval Cookery. The book follows the evolution of the culinary arts in the Middle Ages, taking an anthropological perspective on what came before it, and how the food influences contemporary eating habits. Every page is a portal to the past, every bite described is a slice of history.

    The Medieval Cookbook: Revised Edition, by Maggie Black
    Beloved British food writer, cookbook author, and culinary historian Maggie Black was a prolific writer, responsible for penning such delightful texts as The Jane Austen Cookbook. In The Medieval Cookbook, Black enchants readers not just with appetizing recipes and a hospitable voice that makes thick history digestible, but illustrations that recall the stunning illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages. The recipes are charmingly framed by stories, whether historical events or folkloric tales. Learn how to make sumptuous Almond Chicken, as well as the tempting Blancmange from The Canterbury tales.

    Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy, by Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban, Silvano Serventi, and Edward Schneider (Translator)
    If there is only space for one medieval cookbook on your shelf, then Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy is a must. Published in French in 1991 then later translated into English, the book is beloved by cooks and medievalists alike. The minds of three illustrious medieval scholars, Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban, Silvano Serventi, combine in this text to create a cookbook that tantalizes both mind and belly. The book first introduces the reader to history, then dives into a description of a traditional recipe, and finally slightly modifies it for the contemporary kitchen. Many recipes are familiar to today’s eater, like Fresh Fava Beans with Herbs, while others are a bit more remote, like the Eel Spinach Torta.

    Have you cooked any medieval feasts lately?

    The post Raise a Tankard to 5 Medieval-Inspired Cookbooks appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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