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  • Joel Cunningham 5:00 pm on 2017/12/14 Permalink
    Tags: , fire on the track, , roseanne montillo, the wilderness of ruin   

    Barnes & Noble Reads 2017-12-14 17:00:43 

    The booksellers who sit on the selection committee for our Discover Great New Writers program had a blast reading Roseanne Montillo’s Fire on the Track: Betty Robinson and the Triumph of the Early Olympic Women—and that includes booksellers who aren’t runners. Like Seabiscuit and The Boys in the Boat, Fire on the Track is an incredible—and timely—read, a perfect combination of well-researched history and inspirational storytelling.

    We asked Roseanne to take readers behind the scenes of Fire on the Track, and this is what she said…

    After watching figure skater Katarina Witt skating to Bolero during the 1988 Calgary games, I quickly signed up for figure skating classes. But I learned just as quickly that an icy surface, an ungainly figure, and a deep hatred for the cold would bring about the end of my short-lived Olympic dreams. Still, I continued to admire athletes: their discipline, their drive to succeed despite hurdles in their ways, and their devotion to hard work. Despite my lack of athletic ability, I identified with those qualities (in my case, those attributes would have to be channeled elsewhere).

    Eagerly, I tried to impart those same objectives to my students. Although most of the classes I taught were geared toward men and women, one in particular (called Love and Eroticism in Western Civilization) was primarily attended by female students. We mostly discussed works with female protagonists and as such, we talked about the issues that women encountered in literature and in life. Our discussions often spilled beyond the classroom; energized by the themes in our books, the students felt at ease speaking with me about gender and sexuality, misogyny in the workplace, poverty, racial bias, illness, abuse.

    Against the backdrop of these weighty conversations, I was also finishing another book, The Wilderness of Ruin. I was then not searching for a new subject, but looking thorough some archival material, some interesting articles caught my eye. One was from 1928, announcing that the Olympic trials would be held in Newark, New Jersey, during the Fourth of July weekend. It appeared that for the first time, the IOC, the International Olympic Committee, would allow female athletes to participate in Track and Field. The excuses for this lack of participation had been many, from the silly to the sinister. Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the modern founder of the games, argued that the Games should be, as they had been originally in Greece, a stage solely for the display of male athleticism. Others had feared that the women’s reproductive organs would drop out of their bodies mid-course, disrupting the race; some even suspected the women would morph into men before the audience’s eyes.

    As I read how these young women were being depicted, not so much for their athletic abilities, but because they were women, I was offended. But just as offensive was the fact that these names were completely unknown to me, that they had been forgotten from most Olympic history. There was Helen Filkey alongside Nellie Todd, both from the Chicago contingent; Anne Vrana, from California; Jean Shiley, from Pennsylvania; Elta Cartwright, also from California and already so well known, she had earned the nickname of “Cinder-Elta.” And Betty Robinson, hailing from a Chicago suburb, a young woman who had been running for only a few short months, but of such exceptional abilities that people expected she would win the title.

    The young athletes shared a great deal of optimism, even after overcoming what seemed like insurmountable odds: from parents who wished their daughters would give up on these so-called masculine sports, to male coaches and teammates who hadn’t wanted them on their teams. In a not-so-subtle way, their concerns, expressed nearly a century earlier, reminded me of the same ones my students expressed. I came to admire the athletes for thinking not only about their own individual skills and future prospects, but their understanding that they were part of a team, working together for other young female athletes everywhere.

    Why hadn’t I heard about these athletes before? They had obviously made great strides for women in sports; why hadn’t I, and my students, been exposed to their achievements or their lives as shining examples of what women could do? Digging deeper, I noticed that part of the issue was that male athletes had been given more exposure in general, whether in newspapers or in magazines, and even when female athletes had been featured, they had been judged not on their scores and achievements (and if they were, they were often compared to the men; reporters were quick to point out how women came up short), but on how they looked. Things only got worse once the athletes got to the Olympics.

    Female athletes were appraised on whether they looked feminine enough in shorts and spiked shoes; whether their faces, in the throes of reaching the finish line, made them look too sexually unappealing; whether one of the medals should have been awarded to the athlete who came in fourth, as her blonde hair and pleasing figure would have made her a better Olympic representative. It didn’t take long for me to realize that these debates were still raging today. They weren’t even confined to sports. A college campus, as I discovered, was just as ripe.

    Fire on the Track is the culmination of my research. The book brings to life the personal lives and achievements of the athletes who paved the way not only in sports, but in other areas, too, empowering women with their strength, resolute character, and fearless determination.

    Fire on the Track is available now.

    The post appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 2:00 pm on 2017/12/13 Permalink
    Tags: a land more kind than home, , , not his last ballad, the dark road to mercy, ,   

    Unlocking Character: A Conversation with Wiley Cash 

    In 2012, Wiley’s Cash’s novel, A Land More Kind Than Home, wowed readers and critics and booksellers, including those who sit on the selection committee for our Discover Great New Writers program. A Land More Kind Than Home is a classic Southern Gothic that uses a trio of voices to tell the story of a young man’s coming of age in the wake of tragedy; it’s a novel that so assured, it’s hard to remember that it’s actually Wiley’s debut.

    This Dark Road to Mercy, Wiley’s second novel, takes a less gothic, more noir, turn with the story of a man whose well-intentioned, but ultimately poor, choices endanger his family—and himself. This isn’t a story of black hats vs. white hats; it’s a layered story of living in the grey area, of meaning well and behaving badly, consequences be damned.

    Wiley’s still on the road talking to readers about The Last Ballad, and was gracious enough to give us a few minutes to talk shop via email.

    Where did The Last Ballad start for you?
    I grew up in Gastonia, North Carolina, completely unaware of the history of the mill. Firestone purchased the mill not long after the 1929 strike, which was one of the only communist-led strikes in American history. It turned the city upside down, people died, and families were run out of town. But by the time I was born in 1977, Gastonia had completely buried the story of the Loray Mill strike.

    It wasn’t until I went to grad school in 2003 that one of my professors learned that I was from Gastonia and mentioned the Loray Mill strike. I researched the name Loray Mill and was shocked to learn that the place I’d always known as the Firestone Plant was the epicenter of one of the most important labor movements in American history. It had all occurred in my hometown, and I had grown up knowing nothing about it. My mother and father were born and raised in mill villages close to Loray in 1945 and 1943 respectively, and they never heard about the Loray Mill or Ella May Wiggins, the woman who would become the face of the strike. This is not surprising, especially because they came of age during the Red Scare, when any mention of communism or anyone with supposed communist ties were reason enough to keep quiet.

    I was raised in Gastonia during the Cold War, and many of those restrictions still applied. This is to say that the silence surrounding the history of the strike was a confluence of things: in 1929, society was turned upside down when the poor organized to make demands of the rich; the strikers were led by avowed communists; people were shot and killed. Gastonia wanted to forget that story. The city is just now beginning to come to terms with its own legacy. It made me realize that history is not a fixed thing, and it made me understand that politics and public sentiment can dictate what is retained and what is lost.

    Why did you decide to switch to Historical-Capital-H fiction? (The obvious answer being why not, you’re a writer…)
    Something about this story pulled me back. My previous novels were historical in a sense that they were grounded in their historical moments. A Land More Kind Than Home was set in the 1980s, which was the era that showcased the rise and fall of the southern televangelist, and This Dark Road to Mercy was set in the summer of 1998 against the backdrop of the McGwire/Sosa homerun race, which, I would argue, was the last time Americans were united by something positive.

    But The Last Ballad was set in the distant past in the summer of 1929, a very different era than the 80s or 90s. Because the novel is based on a real event that unfolded over the course of that summer, I was shackled to that period. But there was also great freedom and joy in writing this novel because of its reliance on history. It was fascinating and disheartening to find so many connections between now and then: gender inequality, especially in terms of pay; racial violence fueled by white supremacy; the growing divide between rich and poor that presaged the even greater divides to come during the Depression.

    The historical moment also gave me some real direction in creating characters and considering what their daily lives would have been like. Obviously, the greatest challenge was getting it right, whether it was mill technology, period dress, automobile culture, or language. I did an incredible amount of research, but it was a joy, and it took me away from the page, which is right where writers need to be sometimes.

    What do you mean when you say the research “took you away from the page?” Don’t you need to be grounded in the details before you get to the heavy lifting: characters, narrative structure…?
    It took me away from the page in that it gave me a break from grinding out words, and it was a break that did not feel like a distraction or an indulgence. As you mentioned, it also gave me a way to be grounded in the story and the events, but research is an intellectual exercise, whereas writing is a surprisingly physical and emotional exercise. Sometimes it’s nice to get a break from that, and it’s great when that break contributes to the larger work of your book.

    Did you start with the story idea or Ella Mae’s voice?
    Both, kind of, I started with Ella May and I questioned why I had never learned the true story of a woman who was a feminist and civil rights leader before those terms were staples of the progressive movement. She was the face and later the martyr of one of the most significant labor struggles in American history, which happened to take place in my hometown, but I didn’t hear her name until I was in graduate school in Louisiana when I was twenty-five years old. I was horrified. Once I decided to write about her I struggled with how to tell her story.

    When I was on book tour for A Land More Kind Than Home, my friend and fellow writer Ben Fountain (Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk) and I drove from Austin to Houston for some overlapping events. Ben’s a North Carolina native and, unlike me, he’d heard of the strike and knew some things about it. He suggested, and suggested strongly, that I tell Ella’s story against the backdrop of the strike.

    I didn’t tell him at the time, and I don’t think I’ve told him since, but I fought that advice. The challenge seemed too big. How would I set Ella’s journey from the Tennessee mountains to the mill towns of the North Carolina piedmont, along with the many tragedies she faced, against the story of the strike, which unfolded relatively quickly in only a few months? To be honest, I had a difficult time “finding” Ella in the story of the strike, although there is no doubt that she was its central character and leader. As a way to find Ella on the page I created other characters—an African American labor organizer from New York City, a progressive mill owner who is forced to act against convictions, Ella’s oldest daughter decades after her mother’s death—and I watched Ella as she passed through their lives.

    It was fascinating. I had never realized a character by fixing her in the perception of other characters. It unlocked Ella and showed me connections between her and other important people that I may have never discovered had I forced her to take center stage too early.

    It’s a terrific device, developing Ella through the POV of the other characters. Is that what made you switch to the third person POV for The Last Ballad?
    I made the switch because I wanted there to be some historical distance between the events of the strike and the narration of those events. First person offers such immediacy, such heat. Third person is a little cooler, and a little more distant, a little more sweeping in terms of perspective. That’s how I wanted the novel to feel. I wanted to be able to zero in on those deeply emotional moments between characters, but I wanted the reader to feel part of it instead of feeling the heat from someone else’s first person relation of events.

    Although they’re not stories, A Land More Kind Than Home and This Dark Road to Mercy were both in first person. I’ve written a few short stories, most of them unpublished, in first person. It felt like a very natural way to write those initial novels, but The Last Ballad felt more sprawling, less narrow. It was my first real attempt at sustained third person, especially with so many characters, but I feel like it worked. The only first person in the novel is in the voice of Ella’s daughter Lilly, decades a later when she’s a much older woman.

    I modeled Lilly’s voice after Gail Godwin’s narrator in her brilliant novel Flora. I love that book so much. Gail was one of the first people to offer me a blurb for A Land More Kind than Home, and she’s gone out of her way to be kind to me in the years since. She’s a wonderful person and a foundational writer for those of us who are writing about contemporary Appalachia without the rosy glasses.

    Lilly’s voice is fantastic.
    Lilly’s voice was a lot of fun, and writing is felt transcendental. When I sat down I was able to channel her and hear her so clearly, and I was able to see her in the young girl who is portrayed in the earlier chapters that are set in 1929. She’s the same smart, tough woman whether she’s thirteen or eighty-nine. The challenge was tracing her knowledge of events and evolution of self over those many decades.

    Characters in realistic fiction, at least the kind I’m trying to write, are not static. They are dynamic, and they have to be shown evolving as people while still hewing to some basic characterizations that will allow readers to take that journey with them, confident that the character, at various stages of her life, is still the same person. Lilly is also a person who learns a lot about herself and her family’s struggle over the course of the novel. Each time she was on the page she was burdened by a different set of facts, and I had to be keenly aware of what she knew and what may be on her mind each time I put her on the page.

    Who doesn’t love fierce Ladies-of-a-Certain-Age? Lilly’s such a product of the place and the time and her family’s circumstances. The poverty is brutal in The Last Ballad, and yet your characters are all matter-of-fact about it—they certainly don’t like it, but there’s very much a feeling of this is just how things are. What surprised you the most as you were writing The Last Ballad?
    That may have been what surprised me. We have to keep in mind that this was a time in which there were no safety nets for impoverished families. There were no workplace protections. Racial and gender discrimination was legislated. There were roadblocks to humanity, to realizing one’s agency, and potential. Self-actualization for women and African Americans was warned against, even violently punished. These threats gave rise to incredible power, the kind of power that comes from righteous indignation, anger, and desperation. This is what fueled Ella May. It’s what made her get on a stage and tell the story of her struggle before mill owners who wanted her dead. It’s what made her demand integration in a union that was violently opposed to it. She was brave, but it was more than that: she was angry and desperate and convicted. And she was right.

    She still is.

    No one expected anything from Ella Mae, ever, did they? And even Ella Mae is surprised by the way events shake out, isn’t she?
    No, no one expected much from her. I think she even surprised herself as she slowly became aware of how dynamic and talented she was. Here is a woman earning $9 for a 72-hour workweek and living in utter poverty taking on corporate bosses in a state that is dominated by mill interests. She’s the ultimate underdog, and she’s the ultimate hero.

    That’s part of what’s so shocking about so much of what happens in TLB: the hardscrabble day-to-day, the callousness. Ella Mae really just wants to make things better for her family. She’s not thinking about making history, is she?
    No, that would’ve been far from her mind, especially because her concerns were so immediate and so dire. This phrase is thrown around a lot, but she was ahead of her time in every conceivable way.

    Watching how women move through The Last Ballad – not just Ella Mae, but also her friend and neighbor, Violet; or Miss Myra, or Claire and Katherine McAdam—their lives are so prescribed (in some cases, the women themselves are putting limits on what they can or will do), is sometimes shocking for a modern reader, though the emotional truths behind their stories is timeless. What did you learn from these women while you were writing?
    In terms of female characters, the three most important are Ella, her old friend Violet, and her new friend Katherine. As we’ve discussed, Ella is a poor white single mother who is swept in a violent mill strike and becomes the somewhat unwitting face of it. She quickly comes to terms with her new celebrity and the agency her bravery has earned her. Her friend Violet is a poor African American neighbor, but she’s also very self-possessed and bold. She may face the most discrimination due to her race and gender, but she’s also more outspoken about it and aware of it and engaged with it on a day to day basis because she has to be to survive.

    On the other hand, Katherine, the wife of a wealthy mill owner, sees Ella and Violet’s poverty as a type of freedom. They’re unmarried, they don’t face the trappings of wealth and social status. She feels more trapped inside her gilded cage than she believes they are trapped inside their poverty. She completely romanticizes their struggle, and their plight becomes her pet project. What I learned from them is the same thing that I’ve learned from the strong women in my life: there’s a connection that is forged between them because of the circumstances they often find themselves rallying against.

    Bessemer City and Stumptown (the part of town that Ella Mae and Violet live in) are almost characters in their own right in TLB. Like Ella Mae, Jess/Adelaide/Clem from A Land More Kind Than Home are all seriously connected to their community; Wade, Brady and Pruitt of This Dark Road to Mercy have no real sense of place behind them—is place the key to your characters’ development?
    Place is always central to my writing because it’s been central to my development as a writer and person. I had never thought of the dichotomy of my characters that are anchored to place as opposed to those who seem unmoored, but your reading of them makes perfect sense. I do feel that my characters who know the place they’re from and cling to it in some way are more interesting and more steady. There’s something about being of a place that makes a character feel real to me, and I only want to write about and spend time with characters who feel real.

    You’ve written three novels in less than a decade. Is there something you’ve learned while writing each one that you’ve applied to the next? (Presuming you’re already working on whatever comes after The Last Ballad…)
    While writing A Land More Kind Than Home I learned how to take three strong characters with distinct voices who all imparted separate sets of knowledge and forge them into what I hope feels like a cohesive narrative. I really struggled with the evolution of plot in that novel, but by the end of it I feel like I came out knowing how to carry tension from one scene to the next.

    That really influenced my writing of Dark Road, which is a more plot-centric novel. In that book I featured a first-person narrator who is deeply troubled and capable of incredible violence. I learned to let go of my fear and allow characters like him to take the lead.

    With Last Ballad I learned how to construct a “scene” around a character at rest. You may notice that nearly each time you meet a new character she or he is seated or otherwise not moving. I wanted their intellect, emotional range, sense of history, etc. to be the way that readers conceptualized them. Each character is introduced by the thoughts or memories she or he is having when they first appear in the novel. That’s where they’re all grounded.

    Gail Godwin isn’t the only writer who’s influenced you. Can we talk about Ernest Gaines for a minute? A Lesson Before Dying is a modern classic, the story of a young teacher and the bond he forms with an inmate on death row; set in the 1940s, published in 1983, Gaines’s masterpiece reads like it was written last year. (Much like the story Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin, first published in 1957, and collected in Going to Meet the Man. A Lesson Before Dying reads like it was written very recently.)
    Ernest Gaines and his work has meant everything to my development as a writer and literary citizen. I first read his fiction when I was an undergraduate at the University of North Carolina-Asheville. Although he was writing about the African American experience in southwest Louisiana in between the wars, I saw a similarity in the way his characters worked and revered land and the ways my grandparents talked about working and revering land. I felt a connection to his fiction and evocation of place that I didn’t feel to other writers. This is the reason I decided to attend graduate school at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette where he served as writer-in-residence for decades. I studied under him, and we became friends. I visited him and his wife over the summer. His work exemplifies the dignity of the human spirit in the midst of struggle: the struggle to survive, to maintain cultural traditions, to cling to land that runs the risk of being taken. Him putting words on the page is an act of reclamation.

    I’m always reading one of his books. It’s hard to pick a favorite, but I can say that I learned a lot from his novel Of Love and Dust and the stories in Bloodline. From his fiction I learned how to use dialogue to impart information to both a character and the reader. Nothing is wasted in Gaines’s work. Characters do not only talk to one another, and scenes are never designed simply for the reader’s benefit. In his work there is an incredible sense of shared experience between the characters and the reader.

    You’re just finishing a massive tour; what have you learned from your readers?
    This book tour has been looooong. I’m in Atlanta right now, and I’ll be in Ohio in a few days. But it’s been a blast. We hosted 600 people at the release event in Asheville NC where musician Shannon Whitworth sang and played some of Ella’s music and Charles Frazier and I talked about historical fiction and strong female characters. After that, book tour took me all over the country for something like 35 events. I’ve got a few left in me. It’s been a blast. I published a very political novel at a very tumultuous political moment in American history, and conversations about where we are and where we were have dominated the Q&A at my events. My readers are politically and culturally engaged, and I’ve learned a lot from them.

    What’s next?
    Next? Next is a nap. And then another event tonight.

    The Last Ballad is available now.

    The post Unlocking Character: A Conversation with Wiley Cash appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 4:05 pm on 2017/12/12 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Barnes & Noble #AllIWant Official Sweepstakes Rules 

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  • Joel Cunningham 4:03 pm on 2017/12/12 Permalink
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    B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy Blog Best of 2017 Sweepstakes Rules 

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    ELIGIBILITY: Open only to legal residents of the fifty (50) United States and the District of Columbia who are at least 18 years old at the time of entry. Eligible Entrants who are under the legal age of majority in their state of primary residence (a “Minor”) must get their parent or legal guardian’s permission to participate in the Sweepstakes. A Minor Entrant will be required to provide parental consent in a form satisfactory to the Sponsor before he or she can be declared a winner and any prize can be awarded under the terms of these Official Rules. Employees of Sponsor, and its and their parent, affiliates, subsidiaries, and advertising and promotion agencies involved in this Sweepstakes, and their immediate family members (parent, child, spouse, sibling and their respective spouses, regardless of where they reside) and/or those living in the same household of each, whether or not related, are not eligible to participate in or win the Sweepstakes. Void where prohibited by law. All applicable federal, state and local laws apply.

    START/END DATES: Sweeps begins at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time (“EDT”) on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 and ends at 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday, December 15, 2017 (the “Entry Period”).

    HOW TO ENTER: Entry does not require a payment or a purchase of any kind. To enter the Sweepstakes, an Entrant must have a Twitter account. If you do not have a Twitter account, you may create one for free by visiting www.twitter.com. By submitting your information and creating an account, you agree to the terms of use and privacy policy of Twitter. If you do not agree to such terms of use and privacy policy, you cannot create an account or participate in this Sweepstakes. Sponsor may not receive Entries from Twitter users with “protected” updates (i.e., Entrant has set his or her account so that only people the Entrant has approved can view his or her updates.) If Entrant is using his or her mobile device to enter charges, including message and data rates, may apply. Entrants should consult their wireless service provider regarding its pricing plans.

    Follow Sponsor’s Twitter account at https://twitter.com/BNSciFi and quote tweet the @BNSciFi at the [following URL] WILL INSERT URL HERE with your choice for your favorite science fiction or fantasy book read in 2017. Limit one (1) entry per unique Twitter account and per person during the Entry Period. Entries generated by script, macro or other automated means are void, as are entries that are illegible, garbled, incomplete or that contain errors. Normal time, toll, connection and usage rates, if any, charged by your Internet service provider will apply. All entries become the property of the Sponsor. No other entry method will be accepted.

    WINNER SELECTION: One (1) winner will be selected by random drawing from amongst all eligible entries received on or about December 16, 2017.  Proof of transmission is not proof of receipt.  Sponsor’s computer is the official time-keeping device for the Sweepstakes and determines the order of receipt of entries.  All decisions of the Sponsor are final and binding with respect to all matters related to the Sweepstakes.).

    WINNER NOTIFICATION/ VALIDATION: The potential Winner will be announced on Sponsor’s Twitter feed (“@BNSciFi”) and notified by Direct Message on Twitter by December 16, 2017 and the potential Winner may be required to execute and return an Affidavit of Eligibility/Release of Liability/Publicity form (where legal) within seven (7) days of date of attempted notification. Noncompliance within this time period, or with these Official Rules, or the return of any prize/prize notification may result in disqualification and, at Sponsor’s discretion, time period permitted, an alternate potential Winner may be selected. The prize will be fulfilled approximately 2-3 weeks after winner validation. Any Winner later determined to be ineligible may be required to return his/her prize.

    PRIZE AND ODDS: One (1) Winner will receive their choice of five (5) books from the 25 books included on the Barnes & Noble Sci-Fi & Fantasy Blog’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Books of 2017 list found here: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/sci-fi-fantasy/the-best-science-fiction-fantasy-books-of-2017/. The prize has an Approximate Retail Value of $125. No transfer, substitution or cash redemption will be awarded in lieu of stated prize except by Sponsor who reserves the right to substitute a prize (or portion thereof) of comparable or greater value, in its sole discretion, if the advertised prize becomes unavailable. All prize details are at the sole discretion of the Sponsor.  Odds of winning depend on number and timing of entries in each Sweepstakes.  Sweepstakes is open to over 100,000,000 internet users in the United States.

    GENERAL RULES: Acceptance of prize constitutes permission for the Sponsor and its designees to use Winner’s name, city, state, likeness, voice, biographical information and statements for purposes of advertising, promotion and publicity in any and all media, now or hereafter known, throughout the world in perpetuity without additional compensation, notification or permission, unless prohibited by law. By participating, entrant (i) agrees to release and hold Sponsor, its parent, affiliates, subsidiaries, and advertising and promotion agencies, and each of their respective directors, officers, employees and assigns (collectively, the “Released Parties”), harmless against any and all claims and liability arising in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, out of participation in the Sweepstakes or misuse, nonuse or use of any prize; (ii) waives all rights to claim punitive, incidental and consequential damages, attorneys’ fees or any damages other than actual out-of-pocket costs incurred to enter; and (iii) agrees to be bound by these Official Rules. Released Parties are not responsible for incomplete, lost, late, damaged, inaccurate, illegible, misdirected, garbled, delayed or undelivered Entries; or for technical hardware or software malfunctions or failures of any kind, lost, unavailable network connections, or failed, incomplete, garbled or delayed computer transmission, which may limit an individual’s ability to participate. Sponsor reserves the right in its sole discretion, to cancel, suspend or modify the Sweeps or to disqualify any implicated entrant(s), (and their Entries) if any fraud, virus, actions by entrants, technical or other error or problem, or any other occurrence corrupts or affects the administration, integrity, security, or proper play of the Sweepstakes, as determined by Sponsor in its sole discretion. In the event of cancellation, Sponsor reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to award the prize in a random drawing from among all eligible, non-suspect Entries received up to the time of the event or action warranting such cancellation. In the event this Sweepstakes is cancelled prior to the stated end date, a notice will be posted at www.twitter.com/BNBuzz. CAUTION: Any attempt by an entrant to deliberately damage any web site or undermine the legitimate operation of the Sweepstakes is a violation of criminal and civil laws, and should such an attempt be made, Sponsor reserves the right to seek damages from any such entrant to the fullest extent permitted by law, including criminal prosecution. Released Parties are not responsible for any technical, mechanical, printing, typographical, human or other error relating to or in connection with the Sweepstakes, including, without limitation, errors which may occur in the administration of the Sweepstakes, the processing of Entries, the announcement of the prize or in any Sweepstakes-related materials; or for any liability for damage to any computer system resulting from participating in, or accessing or downloading information in connection with this Sweepstakes.

    WINNERS’ NAMES: Names of winners (first name/city) may be posted on Sponsor’s Twitter account when available.

    NO WARRANTIES: Sponsor makes no warranties regarding any prize furnished as part of this Sweepstakes. Any prize, and all materials furnished as part of or in connection with this Sweepstakes are provided “as is” without warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation the implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose.

    PRIVACY: Any information submitted to Sponsor, including all Entries will be governed by the terms of Barnes & Noble’s User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

    GOVERNING LAW: All issues and questions concerning the construction, validity, interpretation and enforceability of these Official Rules or the rights and obligations of any entrant, Sponsor, and/or any of the Released Parties shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of New York without giving effect to any choice of law or conflict of law rules or provisions which would cause the application of the laws of any jurisdiction other than the State of New York. All actions, proceedings, or litigation relating hereto will be instituted and prosecuted solely within the State of New York, County of New York. The parties consent to the jurisdiction of the state and federal courts of New York with respect to any action, dispute, or other matter pertaining to or arising out of this Contest.

    NO IMPLIED ENDORSEMENT: The names of individuals, groups, companies, products and services mentioned herein, and any corresponding likenesses, logos and images thereof reproduced herein, have been used for identification purposes only and may be the copyrighted properties and trademarks of their respective owners. The mention of any individual, group or company including Twitter, Inc, or the inclusion of a product or service as the prize, does not imply any association with or endorsement by such individual, group or company or the manufacturer or distributor of such product or service and, except as otherwise indicated, no association or endorsement is intended or should be inferred.

    The post B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy Blog Best of 2017 Sweepstakes Rules appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Joel Cunningham 10:19 pm on 2017/11/03 Permalink
    Tags:   

    #GiveNOOK Sweepstakes Official Rules 

    OFFICIAL RULES

    NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. MAKING A PURCHASE DOES NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING

    The NOOK #GiveNOOK Sweepstakes (the “Sweepstakes”) is sponsored by NOOK Digital, LLC (“Sponsor”), 1166 Avenue of the Americas, 18th Floor, New York, NY  10036.

    ELIGIBILITY: Open only to legal residents of the fifty (50) United States and the District of Columbia who are at least 18 years old at the time of entry. Eligible Entrants who are under the legal age of majority in their state of primary residence (a “Minor”) must get their parent or legal guardian’s permission to participate in the Sweepstakes. A Minor Entrant will be required to provide parental consent in a form satisfactory to the Sponsor before he or she can be declared a winner and any prize can be awarded under the terms of these Official Rules. Employees of Sponsor, and its and their parent, affiliates, subsidiaries, and advertising and promotion agencies involved in this Sweepstakes, and their immediate family members (parent, child, spouse, sibling and their respective spouses, regardless of where they reside) and/or those living in the same household of each, whether or not related, are not eligible to participate in or win the Sweepstakes. Void where prohibited by law. All applicable federal, state and local laws apply.

    START/END DATES: Sweeps begins at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time (“EDT”) on Wednesday, November 8, 2017 and ends at 3:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, November 8, 2017 (the “Entry Period”).

    HOW TO ENTER: Entry does not require a payment or a purchase of any kind. To enter the Sweepstakes, an Entrant must have a Twitter account. If you do not have a Twitter account, you may create one for free by visiting www.twitter.com. By submitting your information and creating an account, you agree to the terms of use and privacy policy of Twitter. If you do not agree to such terms of use and privacy policy, you cannot create an account or participate in this Sweepstakes. Sponsor may not receive Entries from Twitter users with “protected” updates (i.e., Entrant has set his or her account so that only people the Entrant has approved can view his or her updates.) If Entrant is using his or her mobile device to enter charges, including message and data rates, may apply. Entrants should consult their wireless service provider regarding its pricing plans.

    Follow Sponsor’s Twitter account at https://twitter.com/BNBuzz and tweet a question in the #GiveNOOK Twitter chat as directed by Sponsor. Limit one (1) entry per unique Twitter account and per person during the Entry Period. Entries generated by script, macro or other automated means are void, as are entries that are illegible, garbled, incomplete or that contain errors. Normal time, toll, connection and usage rates, if any, charged by your Internet service provider will apply. All entries become the property of the Sponsor. No other entry method will be accepted.

    WINNER SELECTION: Three (3) winners will be selected by random drawing from amongst all eligible entries received on or about November 8, 2017.  Proof of transmission is not proof of receipt.  Sponsor’s computer is the official time-keeping device for the Sweepstakes and determines the order of receipt of entries.  All decisions of the Sponsor are final and binding with respect to all matters related to the Sweepstakes.).

    WINNER NOTIFICATION/ VALIDATION: The potential Winners will be announced on Sponsor’s Twitter feed (“@BNBuzz”) and notified by Direct Message on Twitter by November 9, 2017 and the potential Winners may be required to execute and return an Affidavit of Eligibility/Release of Liability/Publicity form (where legal) within seven (7) days of date of attempted notification. Noncompliance within this time period, or with these Official Rules, or the return of any prize/prize notification may result in disqualification and, at Sponsor’s discretion, time period permitted, an alternate potential Winner may be selected. The prize will be fulfilled approximately 2-3 weeks after winner validation. Any Winner later determined to be ineligible may be required to return his/her prize.

    PRIZE AND ODDS: Three (3) Winners will each receive a new NOOK GlowLight® 3 (ARV: $119.99). No transfer, substitution or cash redemption will be awarded in lieu of stated prize except by Sponsor who reserves the right to substitute a prize (or portion thereof) of comparable or greater value, in its sole discretion, if the advertised prize becomes unavailable.  All prize details are at the sole discretion of the Sponsor.  Odds of winning depend on number and timing of entries in each Sweepstakes.  Sweepstakes is open to over 100,000,000 internet users in the United States.

    GENERAL RULES: Acceptance of prize constitutes permission for the Sponsor and its designees to use Winner’s name, city, state, likeness, voice, biographical information and statements for purposes of advertising, promotion and publicity in any and all media, now or hereafter known, throughout the world in perpetuity without additional compensation, notification or permission, unless prohibited by law. By participating, entrant (i) agrees to release and hold Sponsor, its parent, affiliates, subsidiaries, and advertising and promotion agencies, and each of their respective directors, officers, employees and assigns (collectively, the “Released Parties”), harmless against any and all claims and liability arising in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, out of participation in the Sweepstakes or misuse, nonuse or use of any prize; (ii) waives all rights to claim punitive, incidental and consequential damages, attorneys’ fees or any damages other than actual out-of-pocket costs incurred to enter; and (iii) agrees to be bound by these Official Rules. Released Parties are not responsible for incomplete, lost, late, damaged, inaccurate, illegible, misdirected, garbled, delayed or undelivered Entries; or for technical hardware or software malfunctions or failures of any kind, lost, unavailable network connections, or failed, incomplete, garbled or delayed computer transmission, which may limit an individual’s ability to participate. Sponsor reserves the right in its sole discretion, to cancel, suspend or modify the Sweeps or to disqualify any implicated entrant(s), (and their Entries) if any fraud, virus, actions by entrants, technical or other error or problem, or any other occurrence corrupts or affects the administration, integrity, security, or proper play of the Sweepstakes, as determined by Sponsor in its sole discretion. In the event of cancellation, Sponsor reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to award the prize in a random drawing from among all eligible, non-suspect Entries received up to the time of the event or action warranting such cancellation. In the event this Sweepstakes is cancelled prior to the stated end date, a notice will be posted at www.twitter.com/BNBuzz. CAUTION: Any attempt by an entrant to deliberately damage any web site or undermine the legitimate operation of the Sweepstakes is a violation of criminal and civil laws, and should such an attempt be made, Sponsor reserves the right to seek damages from any such entrant to the fullest extent permitted by law, including criminal prosecution. Released Parties are not responsible for any technical, mechanical, printing, typographical, human or other error relating to or in connection with the Sweepstakes, including, without limitation, errors which may occur in the administration of the Sweepstakes, the processing of Entries, the announcement of the prize or in any Sweepstakes-related materials; or for any liability for damage to any computer system resulting from participating in, or accessing or downloading information in connection with this Sweepstakes.

    WINNERS’ NAMES: Names of winners (first name/city) will be posted on Sponsor’s Twitter account when available.

    NO WARRANTIES: Sponsor makes no warranties regarding any prize furnished as part of this Sweepstakes. Any prize, and all materials furnished as part of or in connection with this Sweepstakes are provided “as is” without warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation the implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose.

    PRIVACY: Any information submitted to Sponsor, including all Entries will be governed by the terms of Barnes & Noble’s User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

    GOVERNING LAW: All issues and questions concerning the construction, validity, interpretation and enforceability of these Official Rules or the rights and obligations of any entrant, Sponsor, and/or any of the Released Parties shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of New York without giving effect to any choice of law or conflict of law rules or provisions which would cause the application of the laws of any jurisdiction other than the State of New York. All actions, proceedings, or litigation relating hereto will be instituted and prosecuted solely within the State of New York, County of New York. The parties consent to the jurisdiction of the state and federal courts of New York with respect to any action, dispute, or other matter pertaining to or arising out of this Contest.

    NO IMPLIED ENDORSEMENT: The names of individuals, groups, companies, products and services mentioned herein, and any corresponding likenesses, logos and images thereof reproduced herein, have been used for identification purposes only and may be the copyrighted properties and trademarks of their respective owners. The mention of any individual, group or company including Twitter, Inc, or the inclusion of a product or service as the prize, does not imply any association with or endorsement by such individual, group or company or the manufacturer or distributor of such product or service and, except as otherwise indicated, no association or endorsement is intended or should be inferred.

    The post #GiveNOOK Sweepstakes Official Rules appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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