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  • Jen Harper 4:00 pm on 2019/12/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , fetch-22, karen's witch, , , , ,   

    December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers 

    The holiday season is upon us, which means decking those halls, wrapping presents, baking cookies, and making sure the kids have enough reading material to make it through all those days off school. We’ve rounded up the best new releases for young readers this month, including new installments to favorite Dav Pilkey series Captain Underpants and Dog Man, the first Baby-Sitters Club Little Sister book to get the graphic novel treatment, the kick-off in a new series for unicorn lovers, and more. Check out our top picks and let us know what books your kids will be curling up by the fire to read over the break.

    Captain Underpants and the Terrifying Return of Tippy Tinkletrousers (Captain Underpants Series #9—Color Edition), by Dav Pilkey
    In this brand-new color edition of the ninth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious Captain Underpants series, George and Harold are in jail even though they’re totally innocent—of the crime they’re being accused of, anyway. And now time-traveling tyrant Tippy Tinkletrousers is pulling them from behind bars and back into their carefree kindergarten days, where they’ll have to face sixth-grade bully Kipper Krupp, who just happens to be the nephew of Principal Krupp. But this time, George and Harold don’t have Captain Underpants to bail them out, so the boys will have to rely on their wits alone in this fun read.

    Fetch-22 (Dog Man Series #8), by Dav Pilkey
    He’s half-man, half-dog, and all-cop—and he’s back with the eighth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious graphic novel series. This time, Petey the Cat is out of the slammer and has a new leash, er, lease on life. But Li’l Petey has gone the other way entirely—he can’t seem to find the bright side of anything anymore. Can Dog Man and Petey put their differences aside to help Li’l Petey go fetch his bright spirit once again? Find out in this exciting and funny new installment. Bonus for super-fans: This Barnes & Noble exclusive edition includes an awesome colorable pull-out poster.

    Karen’s Witch (Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix Series #1), by Katy Farina and Ann M. Martin
    First Ann M. Martin’s The Baby-Sitters Club books got the graphic novel treatment, and now her Little Sister series is getting in on the fun. For younger readers or for BSC fans looking to soak up even more of Martin’s Stoneybrook magic, Karen’s Witch is an awesome read starring Kristy Thomas’s 6-year-old stepsister Karen Brewer, who has a wild imagination and believes that the woman who lives next door to her father is actually a witch. With full-color illustrations and a fast-paced story, the first book in the new Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix series definitely falls into the category of dibbly fresh.

    Eva’s Campfire Adventure (Owl Diaries Series #12), by Rebecca Elliott
    The 12th book in this popular early chapter book series finds young owl Eva Wingdale prepping for a fun camping trip with her friends at school. Young readers can join the wilderness-venturing crew as they pitch tents, enjoy treats around the campfire, and even go on an exciting treasure hunt in the forest. Will Eva and her pals locate the treasure before their camping trip is over? Find out in this fun new book filled with illustrations, easy-to-read text, and large type to keep early readers motivated and confident.

    The Bad Guys in the Baddest Day Ever (The Bad Guys Series #10), by Aaron Blabey
    Fans of Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants will love the 10th installment in Aaron Blabey’s hilarious and action-packed The Bad Guys series. In it, the Bad Guys and even Badder Girls are in a battle to the finish against Crown Prince Marmalade to see who is really the baddest of them all. Yes, the Bad Guys—our group of wannabe heroes out there doing good deeds whether you like it or not—are in for their baddest day ever in this new illustrated novel sure to entertain and enthrall fans of the series.

    Bo’s Magical New Friend (Unicorn Diaries Series #1), by Rebecca Elliott
    From the creator of the bestselling Owl Diaries early chapter books comes a brand-new series for helping young readers grow their reading confidence and stamina. In this first installment in the Unicorn Diaries books, young unicorn Bo Tinseltail attends Sparklegrove with all of the other magical unicorns—Bo’s magical power is the ability to grant wishes. And what Bo wishes for most of all is a best friend. And when a new unicorn named Sunny Huckleberry comes to school, it looks like Bo’s wish might just come true in this delightful story of friendship.

    Bad Kitty Joins the Team, by Nick Bruel
    The hilariously high maintenance Bad Kitty is back for another illustrated tale sure to keep fans of the series entertained. In the latest story, Kitty’s owner realizes it’s time for this cat to get in shape and start exercising—much to Kitty’s chagrin. Will Kitty be able to get in touch with her sporty side and get into the game? It may take some serious convincing, but surely Kitty’s competitive spirit will pop out in a flash. Kids will love Kitty’s hilarious antics and the accompanying illustrations in this new read.

    What are your young readers into this month?

    The post December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 4:00 pm on 2019/12/02 Permalink
    Tags: , bo's magical new friend, , , , fetch-22, karen's witch, , , , ,   

    December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers 

    The holiday season is upon us, which means decking those halls, wrapping presents, baking cookies, and making sure the kids have enough reading material to make it through all those days off school. We’ve rounded up the best new releases for young readers this month, including new installments to favorite Dav Pilkey series Captain Underpants and Dog Man, the first Baby-Sitters Club Little Sister book to get the graphic novel treatment, the kick-off in a new series for unicorn lovers, and more. Check out our top picks and let us know what books your kids will be curling up by the fire to read over the break.

    Captain Underpants and the Terrifying Return of Tippy Tinkletrousers (Captain Underpants Series #9—Color Edition), by Dav Pilkey
    In this brand-new color edition of the ninth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious Captain Underpants series, George and Harold are in jail even though they’re totally innocent—of the crime they’re being accused of, anyway. And now time-traveling tyrant Tippy Tinkletrousers is pulling them from behind bars and back into their carefree kindergarten days, where they’ll have to face sixth-grade bully Kipper Krupp, who just happens to be the nephew of Principal Krupp. But this time, George and Harold don’t have Captain Underpants to bail them out, so the boys will have to rely on their wits alone in this fun read.

    Fetch-22 (Dog Man Series #8), by Dav Pilkey
    He’s half-man, half-dog, and all-cop—and he’s back with the eighth book in Dav Pilkey’s hilarious graphic novel series. This time, Petey the Cat is out of the slammer and has a new leash, er, lease on life. But Li’l Petey has gone the other way entirely—he can’t seem to find the bright side of anything anymore. Can Dog Man and Petey put their differences aside to help Li’l Petey go fetch his bright spirit once again? Find out in this exciting and funny new installment. Bonus for super-fans: This Barnes & Noble exclusive edition includes an awesome colorable pull-out poster.

    Karen’s Witch (Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix Series #1), by Katy Farina and Ann M. Martin
    First Ann M. Martin’s The Baby-Sitters Club books got the graphic novel treatment, and now her Little Sister series is getting in on the fun. For younger readers or for BSC fans looking to soak up even more of Martin’s Stoneybrook magic, Karen’s Witch is an awesome read starring Kristy Thomas’s 6-year-old stepsister Karen Brewer, who has a wild imagination and believes that the woman who lives next door to her father is actually a witch. With full-color illustrations and a fast-paced story, the first book in the new Baby-Sitters Little Sister Graphix series definitely falls into the category of dibbly fresh.

    Eva’s Campfire Adventure (Owl Diaries Series #12), by Rebecca Elliott
    The 12th book in this popular early chapter book series finds young owl Eva Wingdale prepping for a fun camping trip with her friends at school. Young readers can join the wilderness-venturing crew as they pitch tents, enjoy treats around the campfire, and even go on an exciting treasure hunt in the forest. Will Eva and her pals locate the treasure before their camping trip is over? Find out in this fun new book filled with illustrations, easy-to-read text, and large type to keep early readers motivated and confident.

    The Bad Guys in the Baddest Day Ever (The Bad Guys Series #10), by Aaron Blabey
    Fans of Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants will love the 10th installment in Aaron Blabey’s hilarious and action-packed The Bad Guys series. In it, the Bad Guys and even Badder Girls are in a battle to the finish against Crown Prince Marmalade to see who is really the baddest of them all. Yes, the Bad Guys—our group of wannabe heroes out there doing good deeds whether you like it or not—are in for their baddest day ever in this new illustrated novel sure to entertain and enthrall fans of the series.

    Bo’s Magical New Friend (Unicorn Diaries Series #1), by Rebecca Elliott
    From the creator of the bestselling Owl Diaries early chapter books comes a brand-new series for helping young readers grow their reading confidence and stamina. In this first installment in the Unicorn Diaries books, young unicorn Bo Tinseltail attends Sparklegrove with all of the other magical unicorns—Bo’s magical power is the ability to grant wishes. And what Bo wishes for most of all is a best friend. And when a new unicorn named Sunny Huckleberry comes to school, it looks like Bo’s wish might just come true in this delightful story of friendship.

    Bad Kitty Joins the Team, by Nick Bruel
    The hilariously high maintenance Bad Kitty is back for another illustrated tale sure to keep fans of the series entertained. In the latest story, Kitty’s owner realizes it’s time for this cat to get in shape and start exercising—much to Kitty’s chagrin. Will Kitty be able to get in touch with her sporty side and get into the game? It may take some serious convincing, but surely Kitty’s competitive spirit will pop out in a flash. Kids will love Kitty’s hilarious antics and the accompanying illustrations in this new read.

    What are your young readers into this month?

    The post December’s Can’t-Miss New Releases in Young Readers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 1:30 pm on 2019/11/01 Permalink
    Tags: , becoming deluxe signed edition, , , , , ,   

    Celebrate the Deluxe Signed Edition of Becoming with 15 Inspiring Quotes from Michelle Obama’s Iconic Memoir 

    A year after the release of former First Lady Michelle Obama’s bestselling memoir Becoming, readers continue to revel in the warmth, wisdom, humility, and candor of her story. In it, she details the experiences that have helped her to become the woman she is today and the person she continues to evolve into.

    Becoming covers Mrs. Obama’s upbringing in Chicago, her education at Princeton and Harvard, her marriage to former President Barack Obama, her balancing being a mom to daughters Malia and Sasha with her work, her family’s time in the White House, and more. The memoir also encourages readers to tell their own stories, to help empower them become who they are also meant to be. Becoming is at once a deeply intimate and personal chronicle of an astonishing life, while also sharing important, moving, and near-universal lessons whose truths will resonate with many readers.

    As Mrs. Obama beautifully writes in her book, “It’s not about being perfect. It’s not about where you get yourself in the end. There’s power in allowing yourself to be known and heard, in owning your unique story, in using your authentic voice. And there’s grace in being willing to know and hear others. This, for me, is how we become.”

    And on Friday, November 1, a special deluxe signed edition of Becoming will be available for pre-order from Barnes & Noble. It will be available in stores for purchase on November 16. This beautiful edition comes in a gift box and features a clothbound book signed by the author and former First Lady of the United States. There is also additional book content—Michelle Obama’s “Note to Self”, along with two gorgeous, frame-worthy prints of her inspiring words, and a portrait of Michelle Obama by renowned photographer Miller Mobley.

    To celebrate the arrival of this stunning deluxe edition, we’ve collected some of our favorite quotes from Becoming. Which ones most inspire you?

    “For me, becoming isn’t about arriving somewhere or achieving a certain aim. I see it instead as forward motion, a means of evolving, a way to reach continuously toward a better self. The journey doesn’t end.”

    “Am I good enough? Yes I am.”

    “Inspiration on its own was shallow; you had to back it up with hard work.”

    “Do we settle for the world as it is, or do we work for the world as it should be?”

    “If you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.”

    “It was one thing to get yourself out of a stuck place, I realized. It was another thing entirely to try and get the place itself unstuck.”

    “There are truths we face and truths we ignore.”

    “Bullies were scared people hiding inside scary people.”

    “My job, I realized, was to be myself, to speak as myself. And so I did.”

    “Friendships between women, as any woman will tell you, are built of a thousand small kindnesses… swapped back and forth and over again.”

    “Failure is a feeling long before it becomes an actual result. It’s vulnerability that breeds with self-doubt and then is escalated, often deliberately, by fear.”

    “Now I think it’s one of the most useless questions an adult can ask a child—What do you want to be when you grow up? As if growing up is finite. As if at some point you become something and that’s the end.”

    “Happy seemed like a starting place for everything.”

    “Time, as far as my father was concerned, was a gift you gave to other people.”

    “At fifty-four, I am still in progress, and I hope that I always will be.”

    The Deluxe Signed Edition of Becoming is available for pre-order starting November 1. Quantities are limited, so this edition is available only while supplies last, and there is a limit of two copies per customer.

    The post Celebrate the Deluxe Signed Edition of <i>Becoming</i> with 15 Inspiring Quotes from Michelle Obama’s Iconic Memoir appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 5:00 pm on 2019/10/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , katherine arden, king of scars, , , mr. penumbra's 24-hour bookstore, , , robin sloan, , , the bear and the nightingale, , , , the ninth house, ,   

    9 Books to Read if You Loved The Ninth House, October’s B&N Book Club Selection 

    The Barnes & Noble Book Club selection for October, The Ninth House, found readers tearing into a richly dark fantasy novel—author Leigh Bardugo’s adult debut. In it, Alex Stern is a high school dropout who finds herself getting a free ride to Yale University thanks to some mysterious benefactors who have a particular mission for the 20-year-old: monitoring the school’s eight secret societies, whose activities are far more sinister than anyone could have ever imagined.

    But what is a reader to do after finishing this incredible book and discussing it at your local B&N Book Club meeting on November 5 at 7 p.m.? Well, Bardugo’s young adult fantasy books would be a fantastic place to start—King of Scars, Six of Crows, and Shadow and Bone, among them.

    Additionally, we’ve rounded up 9 more reads to keep you busy until next month. Check out our readalike picks for The Ninth House.

    The Bear and the Nightingale (Winternight Trilogy #1), by Katherine Arden
    Searching for another dark fantasy with a strong female protagonist? Look no further than Katherine Arden’s debut novel. In this deep-winter story set in medieval Russia, young Vasilisa Petrovna loves listening to her nurse’s fairy tales about Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon who spares the life of a maiden who does not fear him. Wild and fearless herself, Vasilisa cannot even be contained by her new stepmother whom her father brings home from Moscow. The God-fearing, harsh stepmother refuses to honor the helpful spirits in their home, though Vasilisa knows that this means the spirits will grow weak and become unable to defend the village from evil, which comes knocking soon enough in this stellar read.

    The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern
    Erin Morgenstern’s debut novel is infused with darkness and magic—perfect for fans of The Ninth House. The mysterious circus in black-and-white tents appears from out of the blue—called Le Cirque des Rêves, it is only open at night. It serves as the setting for Hector Bowen, better known as Le Cirque des Reves’ Prospero the Entertainer—to pit his daughter Celia, with her untrained telekinetic powers, against gifted magician Marco. Little do either Celia or Marco realize that only one of them will survive the epic battle they’ve both unwittingly been trained for since childhood. But Hector could have never imagined the two would fall in love along the way behind the canvas walls of the circus tent in this captivating page-turner.

    Practical Magic, by Alice Hoffman
    Alice Hoffman’s bewitching tale of love and magic would make for an excellent next read following The Ninth House. The Owens sisters—Gillian and Sally—have had the legacy of their family name following them since they were kids. Raised by their aunts, Gillian and Sally endure whispers, taunting, and gossip about being witches—a rumor their aunts almost encourage with their eccentric old house, mysterious concoctions, and crew of black cats. Sally left behind the witch rumor by marrying and having children, and Gillian, the wild child, escaped by running as far away as she could from their small town. But one day when Gillian shows up at Sally’s door needing her help, the pair realize they can’t escape who they are and the bond that ties them together.

    The Rules of Magic, by Alice Hoffman
    Alice Hoffman continues to enchant her readers and fans of magical realism with this prequel to her beloved novel Practical Magic, which covers the backstory of the eccentric aunts to Gillian and Sally. The Owens family comes from a long line of witches,  so Susanna Owens knows that her three children—Franny, Jet, and Vincent—possess powers that make them both uniquely powerful and dangerous. As a result, Susanna sets firm rules for her children to protect them from themselves, their family legacy, and the truth. But when the children visit their aunt in the small town in Massachusetts from which the Owens family hails, they soon uncover family secrets and the truth about their powers.

    The Magicians (Magicians Series #1), by Lev Grossman
    In Lev Grossman’s book for fans of both the Harry Potter series and The Ninth House, high school math genius Quentin Coldwater is fascinated by the Fillory and Further books, a series of children’s magical fantasy tales set in a mystical land. So when Quentin is admitted into Brakebills College for Magical Pedagogy, a secret school for magic, it seems that his dreams may well have become reality. But, as Quentin soon learns, there’s a dark and dangerous side to magic, his new school, and even the enchanting Fillory and Further children’s books. This prequel to Grossman’s bestselling The Magician King would make an excellent next book after finishing The Ninth House.

    A Discovery of Witches (All Souls Trilogy #1), by Deborah Harkness
    Witches and vampires and demons, oh my! This is the crew readers will encounter in the first book in Deborah Harkness’s All Souls trilogy. In the historical-fantasy novel, Diana Bishop is a university professor and a reluctant witch who rejects the magical part of her life—she hasn’t learned to master her witchcraft and avoids being around other witches. But she’s forced into the witchy world when she uncovers a lost enchanted manuscript deep in Oxford’s Bodleian Library. The manuscript’s reappearance summons a fantastical underworld and attracts the attention of others who have been searching for it, forcing Diana to come to terms with her connection to a magical community she has previously avoided.

    The Poppy War, by R.F. Kuang
    Inspired by the recent history and culture of China, R.F. Kuang’s debut historical military fantasy finds orphaned peasant girl Rin living a life of misery in Nikan, but when she sits for the Keju, the empire-wide examination designed to find talented youth, she scores in the highest percentile, which comes as a shock to the test officials, her guardians, and even Rin herself. She is even more shocked to be assigned to the prestigious Sinegard military school, home to the children of the Empire’s elite. Rin is a target at school for the color of her skin, her poverty, and gender, but she soon discovers that she has something incredibly powerful: an aptitude for shamanism, which could well save her people from a third major war in this compelling and mythical tale.

    Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan
    Print certainly isn’t dead in Robin Sloan’s whimsical part-mystery, part–fairy tale, part–epic quest at the center of which lies a mystical all-night bookstore. In it, Clay Jannon loses his web design job in San Francisco to the Great Recession, and he finds himself working the night shift in Mr. Penumbra’s peculiar bookstore, where the few customers never seem to buy anything but instead check out super-obscure books. Clay begins to track the customers’ bizarre behaviors and crack various codes using media new and old, but when he brings his findings to his employer, he discovers that the bookstore’s secrets extend far beyond its many shelves of books, making for a perfectly mysterious and fanciful next read for fans of The Ninth House.

    The Book of Speculation, by Erika Swyler
    Erika Swyler’s debut novel is a bewitching story that makes for an excellent next read for those who enjoyed the magic and mystery (and architecture!) in The Ninth House. In it, young librarian Simon Watson lives in a crumbling-down house of mournful memories. With both of his parents dead and his little sister having run away, Simon struggles with whether he can free himself of the obligation he feels to the home his family left behind. One day, the arrival of a mysterious book—a log from the owner of a traveling carnival in the 1700s—on Simon’s doorstep coincides with a visit from his volatile sister, leading him to believe that much more sinister forces could be at work. And with July 24—the date upon which all the women in his family have died—looming, he has to get to the bottom of the mystery to save his sister.

    What are you reading after The Ninth House?

    The post 9 Books to Read if You Loved <i>The Ninth House</i>, October’s B&N Book Club Selection appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Jen Harper 2:00 pm on 2019/10/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , naomi alderman, , , , , the power, , , yoko ogawa   

    8 Books to Read if You Loved The Testaments, September’s B&N Book Club Selection 

    The Barnes & Noble Book Club selection for September, Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments, picks up more than 15 years after the events in her original classic The Handmaid’s Tale. Though the theocratic regime remains in the Republic of Gilead, signs abound that it’s the beginning of the end for the patriarchal power. Poised for revenge, Aunt Lydia is now old and dying, but she has no intention to leave this world without taking down some people with her in this captivating tale that fans won’t be able to put down. But what is a reader to do after finishing this incredible book and discussing it at your local B&N Book Club meeting on Wednesday, October 9th at 7 p.m.? We’ve rounded up 8 more reads to keep you busy until next month. Check out our readalike picks for The Testaments.

    The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
    After reading the sequel, you may want to revisit Atwood’s instant classic that started it all. The dystopian future novel focuses on Offred, an enslaved Handmaid to the Commander and his wife in the Republic of Gilead—which was once known as the United States—an oppressive monotheocracy in which women have no rights and are only as valuable as their reproductive systems are viable. Offred only has her memories of a time when she had her freedom, a job, a husband, a child, a life of her own. And now she’s not even permitted to read and is only allowed to leave the house once a day to go to the food market. It’s a reality that seems all at once surreal and prescient to readers who won’t soon forget The Handmaid’s Tale or its powerful sequel.

    Station Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel
    Kirstin Raymonde is just 8 years old, acting in a production of King Lear in Toronto when the show’s star, Hollywood-famous Arthur Leander, dies on stage of a heart attack. On the very same night, a flu pandemic is spreading across the world, wiping out civilization in Emily St. John Mandel’s spellbinding National Book Award finalist that will appeal to fans of Atwood’s latest dystopian tale. Kirsten can’t find her parents, and she and her older brother must try to survive this bleak new reality. We pick back up with Kirsten 20 years later—she has joined up with a traveling Shakespeare troupe called the Traveling Symphony, determined to bring art to those that remain to remind the survivors that humanity can indeed still exist.

    1984, by George Orwell
    Much like Atwood’s The Testaments, George Orwell’s 1984, written 70 years ago, feels chillingly prophetic in today’s climate. A masterpiece of dystopian fiction, Orwell’s tale offers his profound take on the effects of government surveillance, oppression, and revisionist history. In the tale, Winston Smith is a government employee for the Ministry of Truth, altering historical records to reflect the storyline preferred by the Party, who punishes anyone for even thinking negatively about the government—after all, Big Brother is always watching. Thus Winston has been secretly writing his thoughts in a diary, and one day, when he sees a girl staring, he naturally assumes she’s onto him. But Julia is also a rebel, and soon the two attempt to have a relationship and form a bond that simply isn’t allowed in this society.

    Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
    Fans of alarmingly prophetic dystopias would also do well not to miss (or, if it’s been a few decades, to revisit) Aldous Huxley’s ruthless, timeless, terrifying vision of a world that seems, in the current climate, jarringly famillier. This classic is often contrasted with the more overtly dark dystopian novel 1984, but it also offers an interesting counterpoint to the world depicted in The Handmaid’s Tale (in it, reproduction is also managed by the government, but in this case, it has been completely divorced from humanity, and babies are genetically engineered and grown in jars.) Brave New World finds humanity completely controlled by the state—but this control is implemented not through fear and subjugation, but by keeping people so distracted by trivial entertainment, state-sanctioned tranquilizing drugs, and government-approved promiscuity that they barely notice or care about their lack of personal freedom.

    The Power, by Naomi Alderman
    Have you ever heard a woman say she always knows where men are on any given street she’s walking on…like she has eyes in the back of her head? This novel imagines that men might be the ones who have something to fear, when teenage girls can torture and kill if they want to. Follow four perspectives of people whose lives are irrevocably altered when this power emerges, and remember the metaphor that Handmaid’s Tale and its sequel also drive home: that the power for evil is certainly within us, and if provoked, we can unleash it.

    The Memory Police, by Yoko Ogawa
    Ogawa’s dystopian tale about government surveillance and control is a perfect next read for fans of Atwood’s The Testaments. Objects, people, and even concepts are disappearing from the island—and it’s happening at a more rapid pace by the day. Most people on the island don’t even notice, but some are able to remember the things lost to the Memory Police—and these people live in fear of the draconian enforcement group. When a young novelist finds out that her editor has been targeted by the Memory Police, she hides him away in a secret room in her house, where they cling to her writing as a way to preserve the past and their relationship as a means for preserving their humanity. This novel was longlisted for the National Book Award for Translated Literature.

    Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro
    In Ishiguro’s dystopian sci-fi novel, Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy all grew up attending an exclusive private school together in the English countryside, where the students were sheltered from reality. The children always knew that they were somehow special, but their uniqueness was shrouded in mystery. Now, as adults, the threesome has come back together as 31-year-old Kathy is serving as a “carer” for Ruth and Tommy prior to becoming a “donor” herself in this haunting novel in which an oppressed underclass exists solely to act as organ banks to keep other people alive longer—and the underclass doesn’t understand their unavoidable destiny until it’s too late.

    Vox, by Christina Dalcher
    Vox‘s entire premise is based on the silencing of women, literally: allotted only 100 words per day and violently punished if they exceed it, women in this version of America have been robbed of their voices, their careers, and their dignity. But when one former cognitive linguist (aka, a scientist of words) is recruited by the higher echelon of the government to work on a cure for a Very Important Person’s brain injury impacting their speech, she decides that this (and her added allotment of words per day) is her opportunity to seek justice. Not just for her, but for her young daughter, who has grown up being silent, and her teenage son, whom she watches becoming more indoctrinated into this toxic system each day. A gripping read with twists and turns you won’t see coming!

    What books would you recommend for fans of The Testaments?

    The post 8 Books to Read if You Loved <i>The Testaments</i>, September’s B&N Book Club Selection appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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