Updates from Heidi Fiedler Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Heidi Fiedler 7:00 pm on 2019/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: , how to unplug   

    How to Have a Screen-Free Week with Your Family—And Love Every Minute of It 

    If spring has you craving a refresh on your family time, Screen-Free Week comes at the perfect time. From April 29 through May 5, you can join families around the country as they commit to spending more time with the people they love and less time with screens that will never love them back. A week without screens may sound a little boring—or intimidating—but really it’s an invitation to daydream, reconnect, and explore. We’ve been brainstorming lots of ways to use the extra time, and share some of our favorites below. They’ll give new meaning to the word recharge.

    Exercise Your Curiosity

    Encourage kids’ natural curiosity with a new kit. Make some slime. Look at rocks under a microscope. Build a terrarium. Young scientists need time and space to observe the world, ask questions, and test their ideas. This is the week to let their curiosity go wild!

    Go Outside

    Go on a scavenger hunt, take a hike, or pack a picnic. Challenge your kids to find a favorite tree or collect specimens to research back at home (with a book, not an app!). A little green can feel so restful to our overtaxed eyes, and conversation flows more easily when everyone has a little nature in them. You might not want to go inside.

    Read to the Little Ones

    Daily reading might sound aspirational, but with a little extra time at the end of the day, it’s easy to pick up a book and share a story. Whether you’re reading a title you loved as a child or checking out a new series, you’ll be exploring the world of books together. (Bonus: Reading tends to inspire more cuddles than video games.)

    Start a Family Book Club

    You know how much fun it is to read the same book your friends are reading. So why not start a family book club? Choose a book everyone can read on their own. Then, at the end of the week, throw a mini party. Read your favorite parts aloud. Play games in character. Eat story-inspired snacks. The fun doesn’t have to stop after Screen-Free Week. Your “book club” can meet every month, and you can savor the knowledge that you’re raising a family of readers.

    Puzzle Over a Communal Puzzle

    If you’re looking for a communal activity that dials up the serene, pick out a new puzzle and invite everyone to help. Choose a scene that will get people talking, set up some snacks, and turn on a little music. Some kids may drift in and out, while others will pull up a chair and settle in for the evening. Celebrate the skills each family member brings to the puzzle process, encouraging people to swap chairs when they need a fresh start. Then enjoy the satisfaction that comes from working together.

    Play Board Games

    One night this week, get out all the board games. You might want to invite friends and families over so you can have a board game bonanza, or you might keep it chill with just you and the kids. Once you find a game everyone loves, you’ll forget about TV and tablets. Get your game face on, parents. Weeknights are about to get way sillier than they used to be.

    Get Crafty

    Grab some glitter, beads, markers, paint, and glue, and create a family crest, or something dramatic and abstract you can hang above the couch. Channel your inner artists together or on your own, creating a body of work, piece by piece. Whatever you decide to make, it’s not about the product, it’s about the process. This is the perfect week to get crafty, messy, and weird.

    Build Something

    Challenge your family to a LEGO competition or build something together. Get a nifty new set, or try something new like magnetic blocks. You’ll give your hands something to do other than push buttons or navigate a touchscreen, and you’ll have some impressive 3D proof that you spent the week screen-free. Build a TV out of LEGOS, and it might even be a good reminder to leave the screens dark next week, too.

    The post How to Have a Screen-Free Week with Your Family—And Love Every Minute of It appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 3:00 pm on 2019/04/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    3 New Books to Help You Find Meaning and Purpose 

    What makes your days meaningful? What drives you? What are the gifts you and only you have to share with the world? In short, why are you here? Finding your why can make it easier to be creative, parent mindfully, lead at work, and generally survive the ups and downs of being human.

    In seeking these answers, we don’t have to go it alone. New books from luminaries Oprah, Melinda Gates, and David Brooks are helping me on my own quest to understand how I can make my life not just feel meaningful but mean something to others, even in the midst of political angst, illness, and all the trials of the day to day.

    Because it’s true that every one of us is here for a reason. And whether or not we understand the role we’re meant to play, we can trust it’s not just about our own personal success. We may be here to help someone struggling through tragedy. Or we may be here to create a piece of art that saves someone’s life or simply helps them feel connected and seen.

    Believing every one of us has a specific purpose is a powerful motivator, inspiring us to see our lives as narrative arcs. In her new book, The Path Made Clear, Oprah makes a strong case for seeing your own journey through this lens. She truly believes we’re all made to perform unique miracles, an idea that clears away the mundane clutter of our daily lives and demands more of us.

    If you’re like me, the idea of performing miracles is also little intimidating—but it doesn’t have to be. Oprah draws wisdom from the relationships she’s cultivated with thinkers, visionaries, and wise people from around the world. She asks questions that tease out the lessons others have learned and shares them with those of us who might be living more humble lives. In the pages of Path, Brené Brown, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Eckhart Tolle, and others offer wisdom gleaned from their own journeys. The book is organized into ten chapters that serve as guideposts for those who are struggling to evolve. And a valuable discussion of detours helps readers know they’re growing—even when life is messy or the way forward is unclear. That’s just the kind of every day miracle Oprah performs.

    Part of what makes finding meaning and purpose so difficult is there are so many ways we can seek to do it. We might do deep personal work. We might grow a family. We might lead a city through a crisis or head up a classroom. Everything from writing a book to praying in solitude can bring meaning to our lives and the wider world. Writer and commentator David Brooks has thought deeply about how to blend these commitments into a coherent whole that feels personal and full of purpose. In his new book, The Second Mountain, he encourages readers to understand their calling in life and engage with their world. His words will resonate with everyone from graduates to grandparents, but his real aim goes beyond individual readers. He hopes to infuse our entire society with more meaning and purpose.

    The book left me with a powerful image in Brooks’ description of two mountains. Those who are striving for fame, security, or validation are on a mountain they’ll never stop climbing—or if they do reach the top, they’ll realize the accomplishment feels hollow and unsatisfying. Life is really about climbing off that mountain and onto a different one, where, decision by decision, we build meaningful lives. Our days are driven less by outer markers of success and more by how we can serve others. On that second mountain, we begin a quest to focus on others through work, faith, family, and service to the community.

    There’s something so reassuring about focusing less on proving ourselves and more on what good we can do in the world. It takes the pressure off in the same way that it can be easier to socialize while hosting an event than to mingle as one of its guests. Being of service naturally gives our lives meaning.

    No one can say Melinda Gates hasn’t had an impact on the world; she’s devoted much of her life to serving in powerful ways. In The Moment of Lift, she argues that if we lift up women, we will lift the entire world, including the people most desperately in need. As she details the issues women around the world face, including everything from child marriage to harassment, it’s impossible not to feel inspired to take action. If you’re not sure where to get started, Gates offers issues that will call to those on the second mountain.  She encourages readers to join the movement in her new book, part manifesto, part memoir, and part call to action. We don’t need to be perfect to begin. We don’t need to become bodhisattvas to find purpose. We need simply to reflect, focus on what matters, and when the path curves, swerve toward meaning, service, and connection.

    Seeing this little stack of books on my bedside table reminds me to let go of the mundane and envision my goals for the next day in a deeper way. Some days I journal chapter by chapter. Other days, I dig more deeply into a specific author’s ideas. But wherever I am in the process, I feel reassured by their wise words. And I like knowing someone out there is thinking about making this world a more meaningful place, just like I am.

    The post 3 New Books to Help You Find Meaning and Purpose appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 3:00 pm on 2019/04/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    3 New Books to Help You Find Meaning and Purpose 

    What makes your days meaningful? What drives you? What are the gifts you and only you have to share with the world? In short, why are you here? Finding your why can make it easier to be creative, parent mindfully, lead at work, and generally survive the ups and downs of being human.

    In seeking these answers, we don’t have to go it alone. New books from luminaries Oprah, Melinda Gates, and David Brooks are helping me on my own quest to understand how I can make my life not just feel meaningful but mean something to others, even in the midst of political angst, illness, and all the trials of the day to day.

    Because it’s true that every one of us is here for a reason. And whether or not we understand the role we’re meant to play, we can trust it’s not just about our own personal success. We may be here to help someone struggling through tragedy. Or we may be here to create a piece of art that saves someone’s life or simply helps them feel connected and seen.

    Believing every one of us has a specific purpose is a powerful motivator, inspiring us to see our lives as narrative arcs. In her new book, The Path Made Clear, Oprah makes a strong case for seeing your own journey through this lens. She truly believes we’re all made to perform unique miracles, an idea that clears away the mundane clutter of our daily lives and demands more of us.

    If you’re like me, the idea of performing miracles is also little intimidating—but it doesn’t have to be. Oprah draws wisdom from the relationships she’s cultivated with thinkers, visionaries, and wise people from around the world. She asks questions that tease out the lessons others have learned and shares them with those of us who might be living more humble lives. In the pages of Path, Brené Brown, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Eckhart Tolle, and others offer wisdom gleaned from their own journeys. The book is organized into ten chapters that serve as guideposts for those who are struggling to evolve. And a valuable discussion of detours helps readers know they’re growing—even when life is messy or the way forward is unclear. That’s just the kind of every day miracle Oprah performs.

    Part of what makes finding meaning and purpose so difficult is there are so many ways we can seek to do it. We might do deep personal work. We might grow a family. We might lead a city through a crisis or head up a classroom. Everything from writing a book to praying in solitude can bring meaning to our lives and the wider world. Writer and commentator David Brooks has thought deeply about how to blend these commitments into a coherent whole that feels personal and full of purpose. In his new book, The Second Mountain, he encourages readers to understand their calling in life and engage with their world. His words will resonate with everyone from graduates to grandparents, but his real aim goes beyond individual readers. He hopes to infuse our entire society with more meaning and purpose.

    The book left me with a powerful image in Brooks’ description of two mountains. Those who are striving for fame, security, or validation are on a mountain they’ll never stop climbing—or if they do reach the top, they’ll realize the accomplishment feels hollow and unsatisfying. Life is really about climbing off that mountain and onto a different one, where, decision by decision, we build meaningful lives. Our days are driven less by outer markers of success and more by how we can serve others. On that second mountain, we begin a quest to focus on others through work, faith, family, and service to the community.

    There’s something so reassuring about focusing less on proving ourselves and more on what good we can do in the world. It takes the pressure off in the same way that it can be easier to socialize while hosting an event than to mingle as one of its guests. Being of service naturally gives our lives meaning.

    No one can say Melinda Gates hasn’t had an impact on the world; she’s devoted much of her life to serving in powerful ways. In The Moment of Lift, she argues that if we lift up women, we will lift the entire world, including the people most desperately in need. As she details the issues women around the world face, including everything from child marriage to harassment, it’s impossible not to feel inspired to take action. If you’re not sure where to get started, Gates offers issues that will call to those on the second mountain.  She encourages readers to join the movement in her new book, part manifesto, part memoir, and part call to action. We don’t need to be perfect to begin. We don’t need to become bodhisattvas to find purpose. We need simply to reflect, focus on what matters, and when the path curves, swerve toward meaning, service, and connection.

    Seeing this little stack of books on my bedside table reminds me to let go of the mundane and envision my goals for the next day in a deeper way. Some days I journal chapter by chapter. Other days, I dig more deeply into a specific author’s ideas. But wherever I am in the process, I feel reassured by their wise words. And I like knowing someone out there is thinking about making this world a more meaningful place, just like I am.

    The post 3 New Books to Help You Find Meaning and Purpose appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 3:00 pm on 2019/01/29 Permalink
    Tags: amanda chantal bacon, barry michels, carly de castro, chrissy tiegen, cindy diprima moriss, cravings, crystal bliss, devi brown, , GOOP, , habib sadeghi, high vibrational beauty, juice, kerrilynn pamer, phil stutz, , stephen r. gundry, the clarity cleanse, the clean plate, the moon juice cookbook, the plant paradox, the tools   

    How to Goopify Your Bookshelf 

    Queen of all things self-improvement, Gwyneth Paltrow offers advice via newsletter, podcast, blog post, and more. But it’s her book picks that really shine. Within the cozy covers of a recommended read, you can dive into the world of Goop, interpret the wisdom, and treasure whatever inspires you the most. Then you can leave behind whatever strange ideas don’t serve you. The titles on this list are all Goop favorites, and might make your bookshelf—and you!—shine a little brighter.

    The Clean Plate, by Gwyneth Paltrow
    Drawing on advice from experts and her own experience with detoxes, in her new book Paltrow offers more than 100 nourishing resources to help you start the year off eating clean and healing your body. Beautiful photographs and recipes like Butternut Squash Tacos will have you excited to find the right food for your body. Doctor-devised plans to treat everything from candida to adrenal fatigue will leave you feeling empowered.

    The Plant Paradox, by Stephen R. Gundry
    It’s frustrating to spend time eating well, only to find it’s not making your body feel or look any better. Gundry identifies the common foods we eat without understanding how they truly affect our bodies. Learn how to make simple changes to eliminate lectins, which may be connected to heart disease, gut health, diabetes, and more. You’ll be ready to eat plants in a new, more nutritious way.

    High Vibrational Beauty, by Kerrilynn Pamer and Cindy Diprima Moriss
    Taking an inside-and-out approach to beauty, this book includes mindfulness techniques, recipes, and rituals that will help you up level your daily routine. If you’re intrigued by the idea of clean beauty, but aren’t sure where to begin, this gorgeous guide will light the way. It’s time to make self-care an essential part of your daily habits.

    The Tools, by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels
    Aside from the channeled origin story, you’ll find this book is full of real-life stories and practical, concrete tools you can apply to your own life. Whether you’re struggling with anger, depression, purpose, or confidence, The Tools provide a clear process for moving forward and finding a new way to understand the universe and your place in it.

    Cravings, by Chrissy Tiegen
    We may not know how to pronounce her name or what exactly her job title is, but it’s clear that Tiegen knows how to look good while eating amazing food. Her latest cookbook is packed with recipes Tiegen uses daily in her own kitchen. There’s banana bread, Pad Thai Carbonara, and more goodies, alongside Tiegen’s classic diary-style chatter. The combination is sure to leave you hungry for more.

    The Moon Juice Cookbook, by Amanda Chantal Bacon
    With so much overlap between their audiences and favorite ingredients, the success of Moon Juice and Goop is entwined. This cookbook makes it possible to recreate the beautiful and impressively nourishing drinks, snacks, and light meals that Moon Juice is known for. Recipes include Hot Sex Milk and Strawberry Rose Geranium Bars. Gather some superfoods and prepare to wonder if you should eat something so pretty. That’s the Goop way.

    Crystal Bliss, by Devi Brown
    If you’ve been collecting crystals because they make your desk sparkle, it might be time to learn more about the meaning and power behind these beloved rocks. You’ll learn everything you need to know to choose your next crystal, clean its energy, and vibrate just a little bit higher every time you sit down at your desk. Now that sounds like bliss.

    Juice, by Carly de Castro
    Juicing is an easy, satisfying way to add more nutrients to your diet. And it’s totally Goop approved. These quick recipes will help you add more chlorophyll, aloe, and other underrated nutrients to your diet. And you’ll enjoy flavors like Coconut Mint Chip and Chocolate Almond. Bottoms up!

    The Clarity Cleanse, by Habib Sadeghi
    It doesn’t matter how many algae-spiked smoothies you down, if you’re struggling with mental, emotional, and spiritual issues. Follow the 12 steps in this book to release negative emotions, heal your body from anger and resentment, and set new intentions. The process is energizing and uplifting on every level.

    What books have helped you goopify your bookshelf?

    The post How to Goopify Your Bookshelf appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • Heidi Fiedler 4:00 pm on 2019/01/21 Permalink
    Tags: bujo, bullet journal, bullet journaling, dot journaling: a practical guide, leuchtturm 1917 bullet journal, markers, ryder carroll, , stencils, the bullet journal method   

    Everything You Need to Bullet Journal the Heck Out of This Year 

    Once assumed to be a paper-based form of OCD, bullet journaling is finding fans everywhere. Writers, readers, students, execs, parents, really anyone who wants to organize their thoughts, is finding inspiration in the world of bullet journaling (or bujo to devotees). The system is flexible enough for any lifestyle and can hold all the many aspects of our lives that we usually try to keep in our heads. Work, relationships, health, creative projects, hobbies, and more can all be safely contained in a bujo. You can add creative touches, or leave that nonsense for someone who has more time. It’s really just about making it your own, so you can stay organized and see patterns in your life that might help you get where you want to go. Ready to try a little bujo magic? All you really need is a pencil and a journal. But if you want a little guidance or inspiration, the tools below will help!

    The Bullet Journal Method, by Ryder Carroll
    If you’re new to bujo, learn how its done from the creator himself. If you’re familiar with the process, but need some help getting started, this thoughtful guide will help you understand the deeper reasons for bullet journaling and advantages of the method. Carroll developed the bujo process to organize his own thoughts, but along the way, he found it’s about more than making lists or tracking habits. Bullet journaling is designed to help anyone set meaningful goals and live an intentional life.

    Leuchtturm 1917 Bullet Journal
    Any notebook can be made into a bullet journal, but honestly it’s a pain. So save yourself the trouble and find a notebook that already has page numbers and space for a table of contents. Pockets and page markers make this an easy-to-use, all-purpose, never-lead-your side notebook. The Leuchtturm journals are a favorite in the bujo community, and they come in lots of yummy colors!

    Dot Journaling: A Practical Guide, by Rachel Wilkerson
    If you want a little more structure and advice as you learn the art of bujoing, this journal-guide combo will hold your hand. There are templates; trackers; day, week, month, and year spreads; plus page darts and fun rolls of washi tape to add color. Whether you want to create a journal that’s Instagram worthy or just soothe your monkey mind, this kit is a perfect first step.

    Brush Markers
    If you’re ready to move beyond pencil or black ink and more ink, add some color and texture with these juicy brush markers. Each of the 12 markers has two tips, so you can vary the weight of your text. Add brush work to headers, and use the fine-point for detail work and lists.

    Hand Lettering Interactive Drawing Book, by Peter Pauper Press
    It’s easy to feel intimated by bujos online, but don’t feel pressured to make your journal Instagram worthy. If you do want to up your lettering game, this full-color, hands-on workbook includes tutorials and sections for tracing. You’ll also learn how to choose a lettering style and add embellishments to emphasize the most important information in your bujo.

    Dotted Journal Stencil Set
    If you’re feeling less confident about hand lettering and drawing icons or motifs, this stencil set takes the pressure off. Use it whenever you need to repeat an icon or banner. It will give your bujo a consistent look that’s super satisfying, and it’s easy to use!

    Are you excited to bullet journal in 2019?

    The post Everything You Need to Bullet Journal the Heck Out of This Year appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel