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  • BN Editors 8:30 pm on 2019/03/06 Permalink
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    Paul Howarth and Kiese Laymon Win 2018’s Discover Great New Writers Awards 


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    The winners of Barnes & Noble’s 2018 Discover Awards have been announced! In the fiction category, Paul Howarth’s Only Killers and Thieves took the honor, and in nonfiction, Kiese Laymon went home with the prize for his memoir Heavy. Each writer was awarded a cash prize of $30,000 and a full year of marketing and merchandising support from Barnes & Noble.

    Only Killers and Thieves is set in 1885 colonial Australia, where the indigenous people were targeted by the Native Police Force. The country is as wild and untamed as it will ever be—and this debut novel fully immerses readers in that world. In an outback suffering from devastating drought, two young brothers are caught up in a manhunt for an aboriginal stockman whom they believe has murdered their parents and little sister. But the truth is elusive, and the killing spree against native tribesman that results from their misguided “vengeance” has far-reaching consequences that may haunt Billy and Tommy for the rest of their lives.

    Laymon’s Heavy is a book we can’t stop thinking about, a deeply personal work from a fearless writer. This revelatory memoir not only exposes what a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception can do to a person, it also delivers a powerful story of truth, love, and freedom. Kiese’s fans include Discover alums Lacy Johnson (The Other SideThe Reckonings) and Mychal Denzel Smith (Invisible Man Got the Whole World Watching).

    In second place for fiction was Tommy Orange‘s There There, about the lives of Urban Native Americans, and in nonfiction Shane Bauer‘s American Prison, a groundbreaking investigation into the private prison industry and the forces that drive it. Each writer was awarded a $15,000 cash prize.

    Third place for fiction was awarded to Fatima Farheen Mirza for A Place for Us, an unforgettable story of family and identity, and in nonfiction Tara Westover‘s Educated, an inspirational story of a young woman who saves her own life through her love of books and learning. Each writer received a $7,500 cash prize.

    The Discover Great New Writers Awards are presented annually in recognition of literary excellence. The six finalists for the Discover Great New Writers Awards were chosen by two panels of noted authors from 52 titles picked by our booksellers for the Discover Great New Writers program in 2018.

    Serving as this year’s fiction judges were novelist, poet, and memoirist Paulette Jiles, author of books including 2002 Discover Great New Writers selection Enemy Women and National Book Award finalist News of the WorldHelen Simonson , the New York Times bestselling author of 2010 Discover Great New Writers selection Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand and The Summer Before the War; and Jess Walter, author of books, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Beautiful Ruins and National Book Award finalist The Zero.

    This year’s nonfiction judges were Mira Jacob, author of the forthcoming graphic memoir Good Talk and acclaimed debut and 2014 Discover selection The Sleepwalker’s Guide to DancingAdrian Nicole LeBlanc, a journalist best known for her 2003 nonfiction book Random Family and a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship; and Beth Macy, author of books including Truevine and Factory Man.

    Since 1990, the Discover Great New Writers program has connected readers with incredible, unforgettable stories which they may have otherwise missed. In addition to helping customers find their next great read, the program has helped many emerging authors find their audience. The Discover program’s selection committee is comprised of Barnes & Noble booksellers from across the company and around the country. They are voracious readers who meet weekly throughout the year to look for compelling voices, extraordinary writing and indelible stories from literary talents at the start of their careers.

    The post Paul Howarth and Kiese Laymon Win 2018’s Discover Great New Writers Awards appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 9:00 pm on 2019/02/04 Permalink
    Tags: , all you can ever know, , , china rich girlfriend, , fresh off the boat: a memoir, gail tsukiyama, , how to write an autobiographical novel, , , , , little fires everywhere, marjorie liu, min jin lee, monstress vol 3, nicole chung, p.s. i still love you, pachinko, r.f. kuang, sana takeda, the leavers, the poppy war, the refugees, the samurai's garden, the tea girl of hummingbird lane, viet thanh nguyen, where the past begins: memory and imagination, year of the pig   

    Celebrate the Lunar New Year with 14 Books by Asian-American Writers 


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    February 5th marks the celebration of the Lunar New Year, an important holiday for many Asian communities across the country and around the globe. In honor of this holiday, we’ve assembled an astonishing collection of fiction and memoirs celebrating the most recent works of new, emerging, and renowned Asian-American authors.

    Celebrate the new year: discover fresh new voices, and immerse yourself in these dazzling stories.

    The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, by Lisa See
    The bestselling, critically acclaimed author of Snow Flower and the Secret FanShanghai Girls, and China Dolls, See is beloved by readers for her depictions of female friendships and family relationships as seen through a Chinese-American lens. Her latest novel is about an Akha ethnic-minority girl, Li-yan, who lives in a small mountain village where tea is grown and harvested. She has a daughter out of wedlock whom she is pressured to abandon. The child is adopted by a Southern California family, but the bond between birth mother and daughter is never completely severed. Fans of historical fiction will appreciate the richly rendered characters, who must navigate different cultures and customs—not just east and west, but city life and rural life.

    Little Fires Everywhere, by Celeste Ng
    When free-spirited artist and single mother Mia gives up her wanderlust and puts down roots in the affluent, tight-knit Cleveland suburb of Shaker Heights, she quickly befriends her landlord Elena’s family. Mia’s dismissal of the town’s social norms causes friction, however, and when she opposes another family’s well-meaning but controversial custody battle for a Chinese American baby, Elena turns against her, determined to dig up Mia’s closely guarded secrets. Fans of Anne Tyler’s Digging to America and Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies will devour Ng’s compelling new drama.

    The Leavers, by Lisa Ko 
    Lisa Ko’s debut novel The Leavers already has earned an impressive seal of approval: Barbara Kingsolver’s Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction. One day, 11-year-old Deming Guo’s mother, an undocumented Chinese immigrant, heads to her job at a nail salon in the Bronx and never comes back. Two white college professors eventually adopt Deming, move him to upstate New York, and rename him Daniel Wilkinson. But Deming never forgets his heritage or his mother as he searches for answers about the mystery of her disappearance.

    The Poppy War, by R.F. Kuang 
    In a world inspired by the recent history and culture of China, the Nikan Empire defeated the Federation of Mugen in the Second Poppy War, and the two countries have since coexisted in a fragile state of peace. Orphaned peasant girl Rin lives a life of misery in Nikan, but when she sits for the Keju, the empire-wide examination designed to find talented youth, she scores in the highest percentile. She is shocked to be assigned to the prestigious Sinegard military school, home to the children of the Empire’s elite. Kuang is Chinese-American, and the book’s worldbuilding is informed by her study of twentieth century Chinese history, but this is no mere academic exercise—the characters are flawed and true, and the choices they face are impossibly compelling. The “year’s best debut” buzz around this one was warranted; it really is that good.

    All You Can Ever Know, by Nicole Chung
    What happens when you stop believing your own family mythology? This unforgettable memoir starts with one woman’s search for her birth parents and becomes a universal story of identity, family, and home. Like Discover alums Leah Carroll, author of Down Cityand Sarah Perry, author of After the Eclipse, Nicole Chung turns a painful past into powerful art. Bestselling author Celeste Ng (Little Fires Everywhere) is a fan, too.

    Pachinko, by Min Jin Lee
    The follow-up to Lee’s captivating debut, Free Food For Millionaires, depicts four generations of a Korean family from 1910 to 1989. When teenaged Sunja becomes pregnant by her married lover, she accepts a proposal from an older boarder at her parents’ boardinghouse who kindly offers her stability as his wife in Japan. Acclimating to a new country proves challenging, and the aftereffects of the move reverberate through the lives of Sunja’s children. A finalist for the National Book Award, this is a fantastic, sprawling epic you can really sink your teeth into.

    The Refugees, by Viet Thanh Nguyen
    This collection of short stories, centered on themes of immigration and displacement (specifically of Vietnamese people after “the American War”), is by the critically acclaimed, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Sympathizer. The nine short stories are heartbreaking, but also wide-ranging, humorous, and beautifully depicted. Ghosts from the Vietnam War show up, as do families living in San Francisco, San Jose, and Ho Chi Minh City, who are struggling not to merely survive but to live their best lives.

    How to Write an Autobiographical Novel, by Alexander Chee
    After his award-winning debut novel Edinburgh and the bestselling The Queen of the Night—a dazzling epic of opera and espionage in 19th-century France—readers of Alexander Chee knew him as an writer of fiction who crosses boundaries of subject and genre as easily as most of us cross a street.  Now, his collection of sublime reflections on everything from writing to rose gardening has garnered accolades just as admiring—and demonstrated that there’s no more compelling, witty, and surprising essayist writing today.

    China Rich Girlfriend, by Kevin Kwan
    Last year, the film Crazy Rich Asians broke box office records and broke barriers: with a cast made up almost entirely of Asian actors, it became one of the most successful romantic comedies of all time. Much of the credit for that, of course, goes to the deliriously entertaining novel the movie is based on. Kevin Kwan’s trilogy—which continues in Crazy Rich Asians and Rich People Problems—makes for addictive reading, telling a story of pure wish fulfillment (girl meets boy, finds out boy is very rich—like, very, very rich) set amid the upper echelon of Singapore’s wealthy elite.

    Where the Past Begins: Memory and Imagination, by Amy Tan
    In following the lives of Chinese-American immigrants stumbling over cultural and generational divides, Amy Tan’s acclaimed novel The Joy Luck Club spoke to family struggles both specific and universal, and became a boundary breaking runaway bestseller. In this memoir, Tan considers the way she has used storytelling and the plights of fictional characters as a way to help her make sense of her own life’s journey. It’s as much a reflection on her childhood and her experiences finding herself in her craft as it is an instruction manual for anyone interesting in writing their own fictional, emotionally true stories.

    P.S. I Still Love You, by Jenny Han
    In this second book in Han’s Love series, which inspired the breakout film on Netflix, Lara Jean is actually dating Pete, but she’s also dealing with some social media fallout after a (relatively tame) hot tub hookup is leaked to the web. And, of course, Pete’s ex-girlfriend (and Lara Jean’s former BFF) Genevieve is trying to steal him back. The letters-never-meant-to-be-sent pop up again here, as does another old crush. Perhaps the most fascinating thing about Han’s series is how it skews younger in voice—at times, Lara feels decidedly naïve—but tackles big issues like bullying, loss, and family.

    Monstress, Vol. 3 (B&N Exclusive Edition), by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda
    In the shadow of war, teenager Maika Halfwolf shares a psychic connection with a powerful monster. The latest chapter in this acclaimed epic fantasy series sees Maika forced to find allies as invasion looms (no easy feat for a woman so accustomed to standing on her own). Confronting trauma and racism with a cast of powerful and nuanced women, the series remains among the most visually stunning books on the stands, and continues to evolve its story and its world, inspired by East Asian history and aesthetics. The B&N edition of the latest volume of this Eisner Award-winning series features a variant cover and a two-sided poster filled with more of Takeda’s beautiful, detailed, character-rich work.

    The Samurai’s Garden, by Gail Tsukiyama
    Just before World War II, a young Chinese painter named Stephen leaves Hong Kong to recuperate from tuberculosis at his family’s summer home in a coastal Japanese village. During Stephen’s recovery, a quiet housekeeper and gardener named Matsu cares for him. As he grows stronger, Stephen comes to understand and respect Matsu’s gentle wisdom and devotion to finding beauty in the world, and an unlikely friendship blossoms. With lyrical prose and deep insight, Tsukiyama explores themes of loyalty, honor, and loss.

    Fresh Off the Boat: A Memoir, by Eddie Huang
    This funny, provocative memoir by foodie kingpin Eddie Huang, of Baohaus fame, tracks his coming of age as the hip-hop–obsessed, American-born son of Taiwanese parents. Raw, funny, and real, Huang’s memoir shares what it’s like to be an ABC (American-Born Chinese) trying to kick it in mainstream America. It even inspired a sitcom adaptation, starring an 11-year-old Eddie, which brought the book’s subversive stance to the small screen, in a comedy exploring culture shock, stereotypes, and peer pressure.

    What authors are helping you ring in the Lunar New Year?

    The post Celebrate the Lunar New Year with 14 Books by Asian-American Writers appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 7:00 pm on 2019/01/29 Permalink
    Tags: a place for us, american prison, , , fatima farheen mirza, heavy, kiese laymon, only killers and thieves, , shane bauer, , there there, tommy orange   

    Introducing the Life-Changing Finalists for the 2018 Discover Awards 


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    For more than 25 years, the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program has worked to identify and amplify the voices of those new authors writing books with the potential to change readers’ lives. Each year, our selection committee, made up of smart, engaged, and incredibly well-read booksellers, pores over piles of new releases to find the books coming to us from writers we believe deserve to become household name.

    In 2018, we championed 52 of them. Now, we have winnowed down that pile to the shortlist of titles that stand head and shoulders above even their vaunted peers. Here are the finalists, in fiction and non-fiction, for the 2018 Discover Awards. The nominees will share among them a cash prize pool of $105,000 ($30,000 for first place, $15,000 for second, and $7,500 for third) and receive special promotion in our stores. The winners will be announced on March 6, 2019.

    Here is the shortlist for the 2018 Discover Awards:

    Fiction

    Only Killers and Thieves, by Paul Howarth
    In 1885, Colonial Australia (where the indigenous people were targeted by the Native Police Force) is as wild and untamed as it will ever be—and this debut novel fully immerses readers in that world. In an outback suffering from devastating drought, two young brothers become caught up in a manhunt for an aboriginal stockman whom they believe has murdered their parents and little sister. But the truth is elusive, and the killing spree against native tribesman that results from their misguided “vengeance” has far-reaching consequences, and may haunt Billy and Tommy the rest of their lives.

    A Place for Us, by Fatima Farheen Mirza
    An Indian American Muslim family of five living in California come together for the eldest daughter’s wedding, an event that forces them to reevaluate their lives together and apart over the past few decades. In particular, youngest son Amar, who has become estranged from his parents and siblings, is reluctant to make peace with his past. Tension between the traditional Muslim culture practiced by parents Rafiq and Layla and the contemporary attitudes of their adult children infuses this highly anticipated debut with plenty of emotion and heart.

    There There, by Tommy Orange
    A powerhouse debut that deservedly earned a spot on countless best of the year lists even before its selection as a B&N Discover New Writers finalist, There There chronicles the coming together of twelve modern-day, urban Native American people at the inaugural Oakland, California, Powwow. Disparate in their ages, goals, hopes, and dreams, some of the twelve hope to connect with their history and/or long-lost family members; some desire to perform traditional dance; and others plan to take advantage of the event for their own purposes. It is a transcendent work, rich in specific cultural detail but with a compelling, human message that is also universal.

    Non-Fiction

    American Prison, by Shane Bauer
    A groundbreaking inside investigation into the private prison industry and the forces that drive it, told by a journalist who was legitimately hired under his own name with no background check to be a guard for $9 an hour. From the history of the industry to the treatment of prisoners to the ugly changes he saw in himself during his employment, this is a gripping story that cannot be ignored.

    Educated, by Tara Westover
    Raised in the rural Idaho mountains by a family of fundamentalist Mormon survivalists, Tara Westover didn’t attend school until she turned 17, and lived out her days preparing for the worst, helping her father salvage scrap to sell and canning food with her mother to get them through the looming apocalypse. She never saw a doctor, despite suffering serious injuries, including violence inflicted upon her by a sibling. Yet one of her brothers did make it out, however, and came back to the mountain one day with tales of college, and opportunities for a better life. Determined to follow in his footsteps, Westover taught herself enough math and science to gain admittance to Brigham University. This is the fascinating story of the strange ties that bind a family together, and the strength it takes to sever them and strike out on your own.

    Heavy, by Kiese Laymon
    We can’t stop thinking about this deeply personal book from a fearless writer. This revelatory memoir not only exposes what a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception does to a man, it also delivers a powerful story of truth, love, and freedom. Kiese’s fans include Discover alums Lacy Johnson (The Other SideThe Reckonings) and Mychal Denzel Smith (Invisible Man Got the Whole World Watching).

    Learn more about Barnes & Noble’s Discover Great New Writers program.

    The post Introducing the Life-Changing Finalists for the 2018 Discover Awards appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 3:00 pm on 2019/01/11 Permalink
    Tags: , b&n stores, going the extra miles   

    Barnes & Noble Bookseller Danielle Patten Goes Above & Beyond 


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    Assistant Store Manager Danielle Patten, from our store in Salem, New Hampshire (Store 2605), was selected as November’s Above & Beyond winner, and as our first quarterly winner! For this recognition, she received a letter from our Chairman Len Riggio and will be receiving a $1,000 prize.

    Check out the nomination that led to her selection below:

    “Each day, we are tasked with making sales, conversion, average transactionm and more. Our teams work together feverishly to make each and every customer interaction the best it can be, and every now and then as a Store Manager something happens beyond the day to day drive that shows us just how amazing our teams really are.

    I arrived on Wednesday to begin my day like any other, and as soon as I was settled my ASM Danielle Patten informed me of a tragedy that had occurred in the early hours of the morning. The local Chief of Police in a nearby town had a fire break out in his home. He, his wife, two children, and dog escaped the fire, but with only the clothes they were wearing. His wife is a teacher in our town, and they are frequent shoppers at our store. This tragedy was worsened because of the road conditions. Firefighters and water tankers were delayed due to the icy conditions, as the roads had been a sheet of ice from the storm we received that day. Their home was a total loss.

    Danielle and her connections within the community found out what the children’s favorite books were and made them a priority for book donations. Gail Upton, a long-time bookseller, added hats, gloves, socks, and blankets. By the end of their shifts, we had enough donations filling multiple bags—enough items to keep the family warm and the children’s favorite books back in their hands. We even had a donation of a NOOK to replace the one that the wife had lost. It brought tears to our eyes each time a donation was made. For this family’s children to have their favorite books back in their hands knowing it might bring some comfort to them on their Thanksgiving was heartwarming.

    There are no words to truly express what I witnessed on a day when most are hustling and bustling to get their Thanksgiving dinner plans in order.

    On Thanksgiving when I was asked what I was thankful for, all I could think of was the generosity and caring I witnessed from my team, and the impact it had on a local family. It really is what we are all about, and in the end what we do each day is about giving back—supporting our community when needed any way we can.”

    Congratulations, Danielle!

    The post Barnes & Noble Bookseller Danielle Patten Goes Above & Beyond appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
  • BN Editors 7:53 pm on 2018/11/12 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Vinyl’s Biggest Weekend is Back November 16th-18th 


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    For music lovers, connoisseurs, and casual listeners, experiencing the classic sound of vinyl records is second to none. That’s why we’re bringing back a true fan favorite in the second week of November—Vinyl Weekend.

    One of the most loved promotional events at Barnes & Noble, these three days will include access to exclusive albums; special pricing; and giveaways.

    Choose among dozens of new releases and exclusives from Josh Groban, Cher, Mumford & Sons, Broadway Cast Hits and more; collect all of our exclusive Harry Potter picture discs; put your name in our sweepstakes at select stores for signed copy and deluxe boxed set giveaways; save on all vinyl and Crosley turntables and accessories. And when you purchase vinyl or a turntable in store, have a coffee on the house!

    Plus, members receive an extra 10% off on top of the storewide offers below:

     

    • 10% off all vinyl (in-store only, with select vinyl available online)
    • 30% off all Crosley turntables and accessories (in-store only).
    • a free tote with the purchase of any two vinyl or any turntable (in-store only, while supplies last)
    • free coffee with any vinyl or turntable purchase (in-store only)

     

    Visit the Barnes & Noble Store Locator to find out what your store’s sweepstakes are to enter and enjoy the Vinyl Weekend event.

     

    We can’t wait to see you there!

    The post Vinyl’s Biggest Weekend is Back November 16th-18th appeared first on Barnes & Noble Reads.

     
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